The Toolkit Thread

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by hilslamer, Sep 2, 2007.

  1. CavReconSGT

    CavReconSGT Just the right amount of evil.

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,169
    Location:
    CT/NH
    Found a new addition to my toolkit. Nice sharp knurling helps keep the grip even when hands are sweaty/greasy.
    This screwdriver:

    upload_2019-4-27_13-53-0.png

    It uses the standard type bits and also has flats to so it can be used with a 17mm wrench.

    From burredgemetalworks

    https://www.facebook.com/BurrEdgeMetalworks/
  2. rokytnji

    rokytnji Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2018
    Oddometer:
    356
    Location:
    Pecos Texas
    One of mine

    [​IMG]

    Carried on my belt.
  3. Fixnfly

    Fixnfly Not found on the book of faces

    Joined:
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    I have a stupid question...
    Can a spark plug fail immediately or would it give plenty of warning to be replaced before a breakdown?
  4. phreakingeek

    phreakingeek adventurer Super Supporter

    Joined:
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    It depends on the bike...but they can 'foul' with excess fuel or carbon and cause them to stop working. Typically though, you have some sort of warning that it's not running right before that happens.

    SmittyBlackstone likes this.
  5. Fixnfly

    Fixnfly Not found on the book of faces

    Joined:
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    So a good running bike that does not burn oil or run rich should not have a plug problem?

    The reason I ask is that I have always kept properly gaped plugs in my bikes and replaced them every few years, I was wondering if it were possible that a plug could just fail without any warning .
    SmittyBlackstone likes this.
  6. sprouty115

    sprouty115 Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    May 29, 2012
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    Providence, RI
    Yes, a plug can fail. A plug can crack from a shock (cold water), vibration, etc. It's not very common, but it can happen.
  7. dmmacfarlane

    dmmacfarlane Adventurer

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2011
    Oddometer:
    31
  8. dmmacfarlane

    dmmacfarlane Adventurer

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2011
    Oddometer:
    31
    I need some help with the master cylinder cap removal tool ... or a length of string? The string is a suitable substitute? Confused. Thanks.
  9. marchyman

    marchyman barely informed Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2005
    Oddometer:
    11,987
    Location:
    SF Bay Area
    I bent a wire coat hanger to make a tool.

    [​IMG]
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  10. Johnny4x4

    Johnny4x4 Hope 2 B Cool Sumday

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2010
    Oddometer:
    834
    Location:
    West Valley City, Utah
    I think this is one of the most important tools in my set.
    I have a jeep and I go rock crawling quite often. one day while crawling, I had a precarious rock smash against and crack a rear brake line. I ended up using my vice grips to crimp and roll the end of the tube a few times and then clamp it so I had "some" brakes to get back down the mountain. It would have been quite a challenge to work a brake and clutch pedal while steering and shifting gears along with the hand throttle.

    I have used them as an extra tie down point, a clamp, a hammer, a pot handle, a crimper, a wire cutter, a button setter, a grommet setter, and as weight to keep a tarp down on a breezy day.

    Just my $0.02, buy good ones in various sizes, stay away from the Harbor Freight ones, you can actually miss-align the jaws by twisting0 a skid plate back into place.
  11. sprouty115

    sprouty115 Long timer Supporter

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    At this point, based on what I've read here I don't believe there is anything they can't do...
  12. Renegade6

    Renegade6 Been here awhile

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    New Boston, TX
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  13. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

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    If you have strong fingers you can just squeeze the tabs. If not, a length of fishing line wrapped around it works.
    SmittyBlackstone likes this.
  14. ennui

    ennui audio and oil

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    Mar 13, 2019
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    ATX
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  15. RustySpokes

    RustySpokes Ordinary average guy Supporter

    Joined:
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    Pueblo, CO
    0141AB90-E6D8-49D1-A115-877A6737B2DD.jpeg 36643386-82E3-4730-9908-386D603111A0.jpeg Behold the holy grail of tool kit screwdrivers, unfortunately now discontinued.

    Six blades, three Phillips, three straight blade, all store in the handle so they won’t poke holes in a tool bag or a person. The blades are held captive so you can’t lose them and have normal size shafts so they fit in places those big fat multi tip jobs won’t.

    I gave these away as Christmas presents for a number of years and everybody loved them. I don’t understand why they aren’t available anymore.
  16. Renegade6

    Renegade6 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2004
    Oddometer:
    854
    Location:
    New Boston, TX
    I went with this one because of the weight.
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  17. dmmacfarlane

    dmmacfarlane Adventurer

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2011
    Oddometer:
    31
    Thanks, Jim. Now I see how that works.
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  18. Dread_lion

    Dread_lion Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2013
    Oddometer:
    394
    Location:
    Antwerp, Belgium
    for the people who bought the asahi lightweight spanner sets, can you tell me why you havent bought the thin ones instead?
    They are actually in some cases lighter than their lightweight counterparts, and the set is about half the price of the lightweight one too. Am i missing something here? Just really curious by the way, not trying to sound smart. that they are thinner, should be a good thing i would think, that way you might be able to squeeze them into parts where you sometimes cant.

    https://www.fine-tools.com/thin-spanners.html
    SmittyBlackstone likes this.
  19. ThorCT

    ThorCT Lets Ride

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2008
    Oddometer:
    103
    Location:
    Hotlanta
    For me it was because I want the box end part. Gripping from all sides is way more secure than just two.

    Also, of the 12 bikes I have I’ve never needed a thin wrench to do any maint. or more complex breakdown on any of them. A thicker tool gives more contact area so less likely to slip and damage the fastener.
  20. Dread_lion

    Dread_lion Been here awhile

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    Jun 8, 2013
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    Location:
    Antwerp, Belgium
    @fjefman, thanks. Did you get the stubby ones or the normal ones?