The Toolkit Thread

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by hilslamer, Sep 2, 2007.

  1. GordysGoodworks

    GordysGoodworks Adventurer

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    So far it does, used it in the shop a couple times and it's plenty stout
  2. Grreatdog

    Grreatdog Long timer Supporter

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    Ordered on the 14th and my wrenches arrived this afternoon - six days later. I dropped my Amazon Prime because those assholes can't even get things to me that quickly at least half the time.

    Anyway, these Lightools are really nice and seem to be sized perfectly. Now I need to not lose my tool kit (again). Between these wrenches and the Knipex Gear Pliers, I actually have a little money in it now.

    Many thanks to whoever first posted these things in here.

    Final (yea right :lol3) evolution of my KTM lightweight toolkit ..........

    IMG_20190921_181500632[1].jpg
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  3. WF_Jester

    WF_Jester n00b

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    Who makes that top tool and what is it called please?
  4. Grreatdog

    Grreatdog Long timer Supporter

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  5. bkoz

    bkoz Been here awhile

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    And you have used it on the trail?
  6. Grreatdog

    Grreatdog Long timer Supporter

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    Yes, that is my bit driver for screw and hex bits. It is also my shallow access "ratchet" and breaker bar for sockets. I don't like putting a lot of torque on the folding mini-tee handle.
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  7. miks

    miks Been here awhile

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    It's hard to imagine I could add anything to a 12-year-old thread that's discussed probably every ADVmoto-related tool ever made, but I've learned a lot from this thread in my relatively short ADV career (5 years) and so I thought I'd finally give back a little and share the kit I've ended up with. I just finished a 20-day, 3200-mile, 80% dirt adventure across much of the western US (CO, UT, NV, OR, CA - photos below taken on site at Great Basin N.P.) on my KTM 350 EXC-F and used my tool kit on numerous occasions. I'd like to thank all the previous posters over the years - many of the tools in my kit have come from this thread. A special shout out to inmate team ftb - his kit has informed mine more than most.
    Detailed info is below and I've posted a rather exhaustive video that walks through pretty much *everything* I pack, including the tools - that video is here. Gear is always a work in progress so I'm sure what I carry will change over time.


    My tool setup is made up of four bags. Total weight of all fours bags is approximately 7lb.
    - Black main toolkit bag: A simple cordura zippered pouch with a webbing loop I sewed on for easy extraction from my Mosko Moto Reckless 40 side pouch. Contains all primary tools.
    - Blue mini bag: Has a few small tubs of misc items and some other small gear.
    - Moose Racing front fender bag: Holds hand pump, an assortment of Ty-Raps, Voile straps, and 21" tube.
    - Orange rear fender bag: This is a custom bag I fabricated myself from ultra-durable truck-tarp-style vinyl. I cut the patterns and glued it up with rubber cement. I've used it most of the bike's 7K miles.

    The contents of each bag are shown below.

    Black main bag01.jpg
    Black Main Toolkit bag (3lb 7oz):
    1) Rema Tip Top patch kit: Added a second tube of cement, and extra patches. I've had issues with patches failing previously and have read this is regarded by many cyclists as the best. So far so good.
    2) Velcro Garden Plant Ties: Velcro loops that stick to themselves, useful for bundling up extra strap material on my soft bags.
    3) Dual tip black Sharpie
    4) Pencil style air pressure gauge
    5) Knipex 86 03 150 Mini Pliers Wrench: Has been widely discussed on this thread. Awesome pliers. This is the smallest version they make. With 10:1 Mechanical Advantage I could use these for my wheel axle nuts if necessary. The parallel engagement of the jaws is better than the angled action of typical tongue-and-groove pliers, and the adjustment allows them to serve as a crescent wrench of sorts. I've also seen them used as a press to press the pin back into a chain, something you couldn't do with a crescent.
    6) Blue Loctite stick: Less messy than fluid and can't leak
    7) Wera 8000A Zyklop 1/4" Ratchet: Again, already discussed on this thread. Great, great wrench. I love the ability to switch from quick "screwdriver" mode, to high-torque 90-degree mode. I wrote Wera and asked them the maximum torque rating for this (couldn't find it online). They said 100NM. The highest torque for regular maintenance items on my KTM 350 is 80NM (rear wheel axle bolt) so this should be able to tighten everything I foreseeably need while traveling.
    8) Expedition sewing kit: Detail pic down below. This is essentially the same kit as described in the link at left. This kit uses a small pin vise to hold sewing awl needles that are designed to punch through thick, tough materials. This kit weighs about 28g and I think is critical to have for repairing your luggage, clothing, suturing yourself like Rambo, etc. I used it on this trip to repair one of the straps that was coming loose from the front fender bag.
    9) Motion Pro 10/12mm tire irons: You only really need two irons to change a tire and these aluminum ones are light.
    10) Motion Pro 27mm tire iron: Double duty as tire iron and wheel axle bolt wrench = win.
    11) Enduro Engineering rear shock adjustment wrench: Not necessary on shorter rides. I packed this on my recent trip because there would be days (like in Moab) when I'd remove all my luggage and want to re-set the sag.
    12) Wera Zyklop extension
    13) Small pouch for sockets and driver bits: Detail pic below
    14) Small bundle of 1mm nylon cord
    15) Pre-oiled Filter Skins: These extend the amount of time between air filter cleanings.
    16) Silicone rescue tape: Awesome stuff. Bonds to itself (no adhesive). Waterproof and fuel proof. Can be wrapped to fix split or broken tubing. I've also used it as gasket material.
    17) Small tub of Bel Ray waterproof grease
    18) Tire valve stem fishing tool: I hate struggling to get the valve stem in the rim. This makes it easy.
    19) Small ZPacks pouch of shorty combination wrenches and Leatherman Crunch: detail pic below.

    Blue parts bag01.jpg
    Small Blue zip pouch (11oz):
    1) humangear medium GoTubb containing: representative nuts and bolts for my 350, in-line fuel filters, fuel tank removal fittings, etc.
    2) humangear medium GoTubb containing: a couple fuel injection style hose clamps, two chain master links, cotter pin, misc hardware
    3) 10000uF, 25V capacitor: Necessary to start my bike with a dead battery (even with the kickstarter)

    Front fender bag01.jpg
    Moose Racing front fender bag (~10oz excluding 21" tube):
    1) Lezyne hand pump: A nice, high-quality, small, lightweight hand pump
    2) Zip Ties: Way back in this thread I read about Thomas and Betts "Ty Raps." These have a metal tang in them, as opposed to plastic. I carry a small assortment of a few sizes of Ty Raps in the front fender bag
    3) Voile Straps: Also sold as "Pronghorn Straps" by Giant Loop (and now Mosko Moto sells a version). Excellent straps that securely cinch things down. Seemingly indestructible and way safer than bungee cords

    Orange fender bag01.jpg
    Orange rear fender bag (2lb 4oz):
    1) "Trail Stand": Not absolutely necessary, but makes fixing a tire much easier. Used it on this last trip.
    2) Spare spark plug in plug container
    3) KTM spark plug tool
    4) QuikSteel: For both metal and plastic repairs. Used it for both on my recent trip.
    5) Motion Pro chain tool with folding handle: *Heavy*. Haven't needed it yet and not sure it's worth the weight.
    6) Small hemostats: Useful for extracting the oil filter for en-route oil changes, third hand, etc.
    7) Small bottle of DOT 5.1 fluid
    8) Wide and narrow electrical tape, and wide and narrow Gorilla tape - wrapped around Trail Stand

    Red sockets and bits.jpg
    Small red pouch detail:
    1) 5.5, 6, 8, 10, 12, 13 Wera sockets
    2) Wera bit driver adapter
    3) Wera Wobble Extension: permits 15-degrees motion in all directions for hard-to-reach places
    4) Bits: flat, small and large Phillips, 2.5/3/4/5/6mm hex, Torx T25/27/30/40/45

    Sew kit.jpg
    Expedition Sewing Kit (link to detailed description of this kit earlier in post):
    1) Pin vise, cotter pin handle, assortment of sewing awl needles
    2) Threader, buttons, safety pin, emergency business card protects threader
    3) Assortment of threads

    Blue bag wrenches.jpg
    Small blue pouch:
    1) Shorty ratcheting combination wrenches: 8, 10, 12, 13mm: At only 4" overall length, these are very short and have accordingly lower mechanical advantage. However, it's usually enough for most things, and you can insert the open end of one wrench into the closed end of another to effectively double the lever arm to 8"
    2) Leatherman Crunch: converts to a pair of vise-grip-style locking pliers, as well as having some other accessories (knife, file, etc.).

    [Not shown: Small Spyderco knife in tank bag and my eating tool - a humangear GoBites Duo.]

    Images taken on location at Great Basin National Park, Nevada.
    2019-09-07 08.01.51.jpg
    2019-09-06 15.44.13.jpg
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  8. Emgo

    Emgo Started on a CT70 almost 50 years ago

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    Excellent, great information, thanks for taking your time to post this and the video about all the equipment you carried on your trip. If you post a more detailed Ride Report with all the places you traveled through, maybe even a GPS track let us know.
    Ken
  9. Grayjet

    Grayjet Ride on! Supporter

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    Miks, thank you for the thorough post and video. I enjoy seeing what other like-minded folks pack and how they put it all together. I gleaned some great info from you.

    Cheers,
    Lance
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  10. Mercury264

    Mercury264 Once you go Triple...

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    Fantastic post, thanks for taking the time to do that.
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  11. big-g-nm

    big-g-nm Adventurer

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    Great post, and video, with LOTS of very useful information. Who makes the short combination ratchet wrenches you carried in your small blue pouch, and where can they be purchased?
    Thanks.
  12. fanbelt

    fanbelt Been here awhile

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    IMG_0063.jpg Plus I carry stuff to plug a tire and a small elec. air pump.
  13. miks

    miks Been here awhile

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    Cool, glad it was useful.

    The 10mm is by Tekton, and the 8, 12, and 13 are all by DeWalt. Got ‘em all on Amazon.
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  14. big-g-nm

    big-g-nm Adventurer

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    Thanks!
  15. miks

    miks Been here awhile

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    Just search "stubby combination ratchet wrench" on Amazon and many will come up.
  16. Swinefahrt

    Swinefahrt RooteR

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    I haven’t read all the posts. With respect to a standard sized ratchet, is there enough leverage to generate the required 60 nm to remove the rear wheel lugs while not slipping out of the lug?
  17. sprouty115

    sprouty115 Long timer Supporter

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    What size is standard?
  18. Swinefahrt

    Swinefahrt RooteR

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    Fair enough. I have a Craftsman ratchet with a measured length from the ratchet center to the end of the tool of 6 inches which would fit into my tool bag. With a useable grip of about 4 inches from the ratchet’s center, I think it could be a challenge removing the lugs.
  19. sprouty115

    sprouty115 Long timer Supporter

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    Sorry for not being more specific - is it a 1/4" or 3/8" drive?
  20. Swinefahrt

    Swinefahrt RooteR

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    3/8 inch drive