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The Toolkit Thread

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by hilslamer, Sep 2, 2007.

  1. DirtyOldMan

    DirtyOldMan Motorsickle enthusiast

    Joined:
    May 2, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,630
    Location:
    Cass Co MO
    I don’t even know what exactly it is but now I want one.
  2. XRHondafan

    XRHondafan Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2016
    Oddometer:
    2,081

    Titanium multi tool prototype
    Eatmore Mudd likes this.
  3. team ftb

    team ftb Befuddled Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,325
    Location:
    Lost in the jungles of Thailand
    I've got your video lined up to watch as soon as I finish this post. I'm over the moon to see your trip under your belt. This site is wonderful due to all the contributions, feedback and background of everyone. It makes for an enjoyable place to dine and learn about what works for everyone. I started out with a 3/8 inch T handle, sockets etc before whittling my kit down much as you see it now. We have all been in the "just starting out stage" at some point. Like you mentioned, over time I'm sure our tool kits will get fine tuned even farther.

    I have found in the south East Asian environment my Voile straps only last for a couple years before the rubber component get brittle and the strap tears. Likewise my Gaerne SG mx boots only last 3 years before the plastic disintegrates. Just make sure to keep an eye on them and pull one Voile strap until it breaks after a couple years to test the strength. Hopefully your climate allows a longer lifespan.

    Been riding off road focused DS multi week trips for over 12 years, first on a KTM 525. I've never had a chain failure. Then again, I replace my chains well before they need replacement and they are always properly adjusted. I am hoping this has been the variable that has kept me from having any chain issues because it's certainly not gentle usage haha. It is a horrific problem to have and difficult to jury rig in the field, here's hoping you never need your Motion Pro chain tool but at least you have the correct tool and spares to deal with it.

    Please update us with a review of what worked well and what you would change on your next trip.

    Thanks heaps!!!
    SmittyBlackstone likes this.
  4. JensEskildsen

    JensEskildsen Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2009
    Oddometer:
    2,229
    Location:
    Denmark
    I've helped with 2 or 3 broken chains on the trail, and had one brake myself aswell.
    Its always been user error or neglect.
    The problem for me is, I still need to stop when someone on a trip has a breakdown, so I might aswell have the tools to help them.
    For me theres also some satisfaction in helping others, and fixing stuff that would have left others stranded. Right now, theres a bmw owner riding around with my spare cut down clutch lever that was originally made for a yamaha xt600.

    Anyway, this apico chainsplitter is pretty lightweight for what it is, and takes up little space.
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/APICO-MOTO...e=STRK:MEBIDX:IT&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649
    OBX-RIDER, miks, Lutz and 2 others like this.
  5. agapetos

    agapetos armlover8

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2009
    Oddometer:
    100
    Location:
    Toledo, Oh
    I have really enjoyed this thread as well. caused me to rethink what i carry with me and how I carry it. I went from the traditional tool pack / around the waist while riding to carrying them on the bike on the rear fender. This is on a KTM 530 exc. On longer trips the bag gets removed and replaced with giant loop bag and tools will go in there or backpack.

    I found that many of the tools i have carried for years and years I never used metal epoxy, adjustable wrench, and some other things. stripped it all down and made sure I have everything i need for my bike to do almost anything aside from major engine work and taking forks apart. I realized with the KTM exc series you can do around 90% of the work with the tusk T handle set (1/4 drive with 8,10,12,13, flat head and philips bit, plus spark plug tool.

    I define tool kit at something that can fix your issue long enough to get you to your next destination.

    here is what I came up with
    Enduristan fender bag (larger size)
    Enduristan Lydon (Poskitt) organizer (well thought out and practical)

    added some footman loops to the tail to strap the bag down tight to the bike. Lydon Organizer fits in with plenty of space for a couple other things.

    footman loops are amazing and $0.83 cents a piece
    https://www.strapworks.com/Metal_Footman_Loop_p/mfl-b.htm

    here is what is inside
    1/4 T handle with 8,10,12,13
    Phillips and flat head bits
    Torx 45, 30, two more i cant remember
    Allen sizes 8,6,5,4
    spark plug and wrench
    knife
    duct tape and electrical tape
    wire
    tire patch kit
    zip ties
    10,12,13 wrenches 12 is ratchet for tire changes
    plastic gloves and random nuts and bolts that fit my bike

    IMG_8784.jpeg
    IMG_2057 2.jpeg
    IMG_2259.jpeg
    IMG_5884.jpeg
    tonyubsdell, Manray, nzrian and 7 others like this.
  6. AllSeasonRider

    AllSeasonRider Wandering, maybe a little lost...

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,808
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    The nice thing about the MP T6 chain tool is the anvil uses an 8mm hex to attach the handle, and the handle has double ended 8mm sockets. It's really easy to combine with that other bits and sockets to make a t handle out of it, and you end up with a super minimalist multi tool and chain tool.
    Magus, Lutz and SmittyBlackstone like this.
  7. miks

    miks Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2014
    Oddometer:
    119
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    Thanks for this link - looks interesting. The Motion Pro one I have weighs probably half a pound just by itself so it would be nice to have something lighter, especially for a tool that is rarely used.
  8. miks

    miks Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2014
    Oddometer:
    119
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    team ftb - Right on. Good to re-connect, and I hope that "Duo" is still working well for you. Yes, this site and thread have been really great.

    Everything I used on my trip worked pretty well. The Trail Stand is heavy but it sure makes the inevitable tire fixing easier so I'm keeping it for now. I wish someone made a lightweight version of that product - when used there is mostly just axial loading and I think a stiff plastic would be strong enough and could probably cut the weight in half - I may try to mock something up at some point with off-the-shelf plastic or even carbon fiber tubing. I've also wondered if you could make little connector bolts that would allow you to gang up all the stubby combination ratchets to make one, long, "trail stand". Otherwise, I dinged my clutch cover on a get-off in Utah and there was a small crack that started to weep oil. The QuikSteel did great as a patch so that's a winner and will be kept in the kit. Motion Pro tire irons worked fine as both axle nut wrench and tire irons. The Wera 1/4" wrench and bits/sockets and Knipex pliers are awesome.
    I think this is a pretty good kit for this bike. For me at this point it's seeing if I can remove anything "safely". The chain breaker is questionable because I have yet to use it after several years of riding - like you, I try to take care of my bike and so far haven't had any chain failures. It seems like it's a question of finding a balance between preparedness and lightness/simplicity, which is likely to be different for everyone.
    2019-09-06 12.23.20.jpg 2019-09-06 12.23.24.jpg 2019-09-06 12.33.37.jpg
  9. JensEskildsen

    JensEskildsen Long timer

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    Mar 24, 2009
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    2,229
    Location:
    Denmark
  10. Chalk

    Chalk Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2016
    Oddometer:
    372
    Location:
    England
    Anyone got experience of the Eastbound tyre pro. Looks good but wonder how durable it is.
    SmittyBlackstone likes this.
  11. sprouty115

    sprouty115 Long timer Supporter

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    May 29, 2012
    Oddometer:
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    $90+shipping for tire spoons that require assembly and that don't have an integrated spanner to remove the wheel? These things always seem like a good idea until you have to use them and then they turn out to be more of a pain in the ass than the simpler, lighter, and less expensive option.
    SmittyBlackstone likes this.
  12. 7800

    7800 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2018
    Oddometer:
    30
    Location:
    UK and South Africa
    I use one of these and with a motion pro tyre lever/24mm spanner and a set of 3/8 sockets
    [​IMG]
  13. AllSeasonRider

    AllSeasonRider Wandering, maybe a little lost...

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,808
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    They look clever - spoons that work as axle wrenches and bead breakers - but I'm with @sprouty115 - a regular tire spoon seems far less finicky and far less expensive. The fact that they collapse down doesn't make them smaller, it makes them a different shape. So unless you absolutely can't find a spot for a 10" long tire spoon, it's a hard sell for me.
  14. Reklaw59

    Reklaw59 Faster than your Nan.

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,096
    Location:
    Perth. West Oz

    Ratchets break.
    Kinsman likes this.
  15. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

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    Feb 11, 2005
    Oddometer:
    90,045
    Location:
    Alexandria, VA
    So rarely that it is a non-issue. Even my cheap composite Harbor Freight ratchets have never failed, even with heavy use and abuse.
    tonyubsdell likes this.
  16. Kinsman

    Kinsman Ribs....for her pleasure

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    Feb 11, 2005
    Oddometer:
    5,920
    Location:
    Stevensville, Montana
    I've never had one fail either but I'm still not putting all my eggs in that basket.
    Snake Oiler and SmittyBlackstone like this.
  17. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2005
    Oddometer:
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    Alexandria, VA
    Think of it a little differently. A T-handle has, at best, a 1/4 turn in tight quarters. That mean you either will not be able to tighten, or loosen, a bolt/nut in some cases. I would rather risk a broken ratchet, than have a tool that is possibly useless when I need it most.
    tonyubsdell and SmittyBlackstone like this.
  18. sprouty115

    sprouty115 Long timer Supporter

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    I would agree - I carry a 1/4"-drive set, which has a max torque rating higher than anything I would use it for (all the larger fasteners, like axle nuts, are covered by the combination tire spoon/box-end spanner). But I still carry a 1/4" breaker bar, because that's I how I was taught to use the tools and because it makes sense to me.

    Which is a valid concern and why I believe you should work on your bike with your trail kit to know exactly what works and what doesn't before you need it in the middle of nowhere.
    Kinsman, Magus, Stu and 1 other person like this.
  19. Kinsman

    Kinsman Ribs....for her pleasure

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2005
    Oddometer:
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    Location:
    Stevensville, Montana
    I carry 1/4 drive sockets and insert bits hex and torx. All of these can be driven by ratchet, screwdriver handle or breaker bar. I carry a few combo wrenches too. My tar arns double as axle wrenches.
  20. Grreatdog

    Grreatdog Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2007
    Oddometer:
    34,804
    Location:
    Annapolis, MD
    My folding tee eliminates normal tee handle interference. At least it does on my KTM's. Plus the little kit comes with a swivel. But between the handle swivel and the handle being able to slide through to one side or the other, I never have any clearance issues and have never needed the 1/4" swivel. I don't even carry it.