The Toolkit Thread

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by hilslamer, Sep 2, 2007.

  1. Stu

    Stu Buffo Maximus Supporter

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    I'm a post millennial at 80. Good tools matter especially when you hit a tree or tangle up with barbed wire. Snap-On have been light weight and with zero failures since 1957 when I first started purchasing them (where were you then?). I carry a compliment of their tools in my fanny pack even though I have not purchased houses to flip. I just invested in land in the golden triangle in Illinois which I still have. Pretty flat for riding on though. Motion Pro makes great tools but my preference is for Snap-On. They have not let me down since my fledging days as a mechanic (that was a mistake) in 1955.

    Stu
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  2. AllSeasonRider

    AllSeasonRider Wandering, maybe a little lost...

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    WTF is that post supposed to even mean?
  3. sprouty115

    sprouty115 Long timer Supporter

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    He was, and while I don't think it was anything more than a poke, the point is valid - we (boomers and older) should be doing everything we can to be inclusive.
    He likes Snap On tools. Solid tools, certainly not light though.
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  4. AllSeasonRider

    AllSeasonRider Wandering, maybe a little lost...

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    Used many a snap on tool when I worked in a garage while in high school and college. Agree they're solid, but not light. Never owned any of my own, though, save for a screwdriver that I think belongs to an old buddy - I was too young and poor for anything but Craftsman in those days.

    I told one of the mechanics I wanted to be a mechanic myself. He asked if I liked working in cars. I said yes. He said then don't be a mechanic cause you'll hate working on cars. Learned a lot there, but happy it was only ever a part time job-turned-hobby.

    Back to on-the-bike toolkits...

    Anyone have a trick for helping to fish the valve stem on a tube through the hole? Are those screw on wire things the only game in town?
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  5. bkoz

    bkoz test

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    It was about the ridiculous tool rolls.

    I wonder if I would have got the same reaction if I said boomer instead of millennial?

    Anyways dirt-bike-gear makes a great tool roll for a more realistic price.

    http://www.dirt-bike-gear.com/tw.html
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  6. sprouty115

    sprouty115 Long timer Supporter

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    If you're changing the tire or taking it off completely, then I follow this process (valve stem installation around 4:30).



    If you're only taking one side off to get the tube out, like when fixing a flat on the trail, if possible don't remove the valve from the rim. Patch the tube with it partially installed in the tire.

    But if the tube has to come out to be replaced then I've used a pair of tire irons to give my hand a little space. Push in, rotate up, then down to move otherside of the tire away from the center - while making sure not to pinch anything.
  7. THRASHED

    THRASHED In your helmet, no-one can hear you sing, I hope.

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    Not sure about the only game, but the "screw on wire things" make it soo much easier, aren't too expensive, and take up almost no room. That and a Bead Buddy have been huge time savers for me.
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  8. bkoz

    bkoz test

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    This is the best way to change a tire.

    IMO he missed a step. I always fill the tube with just enough air for it to make it's shape. It reduces the chance of pinching the tube with a spoon to virtually 0.

    Go to the 3 min mark.

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  9. NorskieRider

    NorskieRider Long timer

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    My beef with the valve stem fishing tools is that they're generally cheap and the wire pulls out of the handle too easily. On the other hand, that means you now have a much smaller tool if you can fashion a loop out of that end and use it with a socket expension etc. instead of the included handle.

    Oh and if you get one ... make sure the screw in part swivels independently.
  10. NorskieRider

    NorskieRider Long timer

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  11. Stu

    Stu Buffo Maximus Supporter

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    I make certain the bead of the tire opposite from the stem is completely down in the well of the rim first and then the tube's stem is easier to get in the hole. That allows me to carry fewer tools. I do carry some Snap-On tools. Their 1/4" ratchet is tough, light and the smaller 1/4" sockets can be carried in an old film can. For axle nuts I use the Motion Pro tire irons with their box ends to fit the dimensions I need for front and rear axle nuts.

    It seems that I only need tools if I forget to take them with me or if someone else is riding and they need help. I do carry 12mm & 14mm wrenchs for non-KTM bikes since I find that I also need those from time to time.

    Stu
  12. sprouty115

    sprouty115 Long timer Supporter

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    I absolutely agree, but it is mentioned in the vid, around the 3:30 mark.
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  13. bkoz

    bkoz test

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    I use my tool roll in a tool tube.

    I am surprised that ziploc bags last. I am on my 2nd tool roll because of wear caused by the wrenches rubbing.
  14. Mike Ryder

    Mike Ryder Kriegerkuh Supporter

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    Try gluing a small strong magnet to a wire.
  15. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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    Screw on is of use only where the valve stem hole in the rim is big enough to pass through the screw on part. Screw in works on all of them including bicycles.
    If the screw on fits through your bikes valve stem holes and it's staying in the bike tool kit that's the one I'd go with because of bigger threads and more engagement.
  16. NorskieRider

    NorskieRider Long timer

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    They don't, I have to replace them periodically.
  17. Baroquenride

    Baroquenride Everyone dies, but not everyone truly lives.

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    In my MRE's I get a tall plastic bag that's slightly heavier duty than a zip-lock bag and use that for my tools. I don't mind replacing it occasionally when they wear through it because A) 95% of my tools fit snugly in the bag, B) it doesn't take up nearly the space, C) the bag would get thrown away anyway, D) it's lighter than a tool roll, but that's a non-issue with me.
  18. AllSeasonRider

    AllSeasonRider Wandering, maybe a little lost...

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    I have a bunch of thick zip top bags. You ca n buy them in sets with all different sizes. Not sure on the thickness, but I think they're probably 6 ro 8 mil... pretty heavy duty and last a while, especially if they're packing into something like soft luggage.
  19. clintnz

    clintnz Trans-Global Chook Chaser

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    I had one of those screw in things & I thought it sucked.

    The easiest way for me is to lever the mounted side of the tyre back off the rim next to the valve hole (wedge the lever under the disc or sprocket) Set the tyre on the ground (or another tyre if you're in the shed) With a foot on the wheel you can then pull up the unmounted side of the tyre with one hand & feed in the valve with the other.

    Cheers
    Clint
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  20. Albie

    Albie Kool Aid poisoner

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    Agree, used both tools dozens of times. They are part of my flat kit and also get used every time I change tube tires at home. These kinds of specialty tools work great if you use them correctly. Problem is a lot of people never figfure it out and disregard them. Another tool that a lot of people use incorrectly is a chain breaker.
    Eatmore Mudd likes this.