The Toolkit Thread

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by hilslamer, Sep 2, 2007.

  1. Mordster

    Mordster Wish I was riding, doesn't matter where to

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2019
    Oddometer:
    86
    Location:
    Valencia CA
    I have one of these (Lezyne) is awesome. 3 strokes per pound on my front stock '19 r1250gs tire. Fits in my $7 tool tube alongside toolkit.

    xsf18cdf likes this.
  2. NorskieRider

    NorskieRider Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,265
    Location:
    Minnesota
    Any suggestions for a compact and accurate tire pressure guage? Bonus if it has a pressure relief valve.
  3. slink

    slink Been here awhile

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    Feb 19, 2015
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    235
    Location:
    Estes Park, CO
  4. robsmoto

    robsmoto Motorcycleton

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2001
    Oddometer:
    375
    Location:
    usa
    For use on the road I carry the CyclePump EZ air gauge with the 90 degree chuck. This allows for air pressure to be checked and added using air typically found at gas stations. [I also carry a small battery powered compressor].
    https://bestrestproducts.com/shop/c...edition-tire-inflator/cyclepump-ez-air-gauge/

    For the garage, I have several devices. I favor the bourdon-tube type of gauge, but some digital units are also ok. To check pressure I like one with a flexible hose between the chuck and gauge -
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00HFX38U4/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    For checking and adding air, I have the digital unit in the link below attached to the compressor hose. A standard chuck is used to fit the wheel valve stem.
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01N9TD8MQ/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    https://www.amazon.com/Coilhose-Pne...ds=compressed+air+chuck&qid=1585662074&sr=8-9

    I have compared these gauges and they provide a pressure reading within one psi of one another around 40 psi. For my purposes, this is adequate.
    Each has the ability to bleed air to achieve a desired pressure.
  5. NorskieRider

    NorskieRider Long timer

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  6. Red liner

    Red liner Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 16, 2013
    Oddometer:
    319
    Heres my little tool kit.



    Haven't got the latest and greatest of anything, but they all work on the trail and i guess thats that counts.

    Some questions for the folks here:

    1. What else should I add?
    2. Is there lighter stuff I can replace something here with?
    3. Good multitool recommendation? I got recommended the Leatherman Wave with the bit driver extender. Looks really awesome.

    PS: I interchanged the lbs/kg nomenclature in the video. I think I got a bit nervous towards the end of it
  7. gammel

    gammel Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2013
    Oddometer:
    860
    Location:
    Bay Area
    Love the mini multi-meter. Just looked it up and cheap enough to give a test. Thanks nice tool kit idea..
    SmittyBlackstone and Red liner like this.
  8. solitary1

    solitary1 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2010
    Oddometer:
    590
    Location:
    northern england
    its not your responsibility to carry tools for other people or fix their bikes while they stand messing with their phones,I understand that everybody needs to pitch in when a rider is in a bind but this can wear on you mentally and physically AMHIK its a big no no to leave a stranded companion but people are quick to play on this and don"t carry tools or learn to use them.Maybe choose who you ride with more carefully or organise tech days to teach people what tools they need and how to use them,either approach will lighten YOUR tool kit.
  9. marchyman

    marchyman barely informed Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2005
    Oddometer:
    13,111
    Location:
    SF Bay Area
    :nod I no longer will carry tools that I'll never need on my bike. My tool kit is half of what it used to be as a result. If I happen to have a tool necessary to help a fellow rider, fine. I do carry more cable ties, safety wire, and electrical wire than I used to. With those supplies you can sometimes sew a bike back together enough to get home.
  10. keepshoveling

    keepshoveling DNF

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    4,795
    Location:
    NYC
    @rkdwp THIS IS ALL LIES. DONT PAY ANY ATTENTION TO IT
  11. Stu

    Stu Buffo Maximus Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2004
    Oddometer:
    1,453
    Location:
    Eastern YahooLand
    No matter how incompetent a wrench my buddies are or what they may not have (usually no tools at all) I never leave them in the lurch. I ask them to help me try to get their bike going again which can be seen as a learning experience. I carry a 12 & 14mm set of tools for Japanese bikes I would never need for my KTM. Fixes are usually quick and appreciated. If you are competent with tools and you value riding with friends who may be mechanically challenged just help them out. You might be asking them to get into a mud pit to help dig your bike out.

    I also carry the Motion Pro tire tools since they incorporate axle nut box ends. I carry long nose, needle nose pliers and have used them a lot. I also carry a tough nylon rope if I have to help tow someone out. Along with that I rigged up a 4' section of hose with a connector to my fuel system (FI) so I can pump fuel into someone else's tank if needed. And a couple of tire irons along with a 21" tube, the tube on longer rides only. I have never needed or carried a multimeter. Most of the electrical problems are broken / frayed / cooked wires. If your multimeter tells you your stator is bad and you are in the middle of nowhere you are still unable to fix it.

    Red Liner: Thanks for the run down on tools you suggest for the Adventure bikes. It is very good and I appreciate it. I just ride KTM 450 & 500s, mostly off road, so my needs are slightly different from yours.

    Stu
  12. rkdwp

    rkdwp Axel Anderson Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2014
    Oddometer:
    339
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    lucky for you we have basically the same bike :ricky
  13. twowings

    twowings Comfortably Numb... Supporter

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    Dec 29, 2015
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    Satellite of Love
    I have had the incredibly good fortune so far to have been priveleged to offer the tools and spares I carry to help others...to aid in getting a fellow rider going again is more than enough justification for the weight penalty...I know my luck will run out eventually, too...
  14. david61

    david61 Queue, a word with 4 silent letters....

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2013
    Oddometer:
    2,053
    Location:
    Western Australia
    I'm all for helping out fellow riders when they run into a spot of mechanical bother.

    But there's also a small selection of riders out there who roll up unprepared from the start, and then when it comes to even a simple issue, like a flat tyre, flail away trying to fix it, until someone loses their shit over the time being taken and steps in and finishes the job. Often me, because I hate standing on the side of the road somewhere wasting riding time while some no-hoper [deliberately sometimes] tries to "fix" something.

    I don't think it's unreasonable to have a reasonable selection of tools and goodies when you go for a ride, and at least a bit of practice doing basic stuff, it's only polite.....
  15. Zubb

    Zubb he went that-a-way... Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2002
    Oddometer:
    3,006
    Location:
    San Diego
    and it's great for the community when you 'show them the way' with your sweet tool kit, so they can go home and put their own together. I'm guessing it's the repeat offender irks you.

    When I was mountaineering, the rule was to carry your own medical kit. If you got hurt, your climbing partner would use your own kit on you. Because if he used his, he could end up needing it and not having the supplies to survive.
    Tools are different as they are not consumed when put to use. But the same principal should apply in my opinion.
  16. Red liner

    Red liner Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 16, 2013
    Oddometer:
    319
    Just a little something I did today [​IMG]


    I think we need more such lockdown's...else nothing gets done [​IMG] I think I spent more time on the video than on the tool clean up!

    I need a new ratchet. This one has a lot of play in the direction changer. Shortlisted one from Felo Tools: https://www.kctoolco.com/felo-61569-...tchet-1-4-hex/

    Anyone have this?
  17. Madman4049

    Madman4049 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2017
    Oddometer:
    254
    Location:
    NW Louisiana
    Just buy a Gearwrench or other high quality ratchet and be done with it, pulling the spring like that is a temp fix.

    Agreed, I'll stop and help anyone anytime but I'm not adding unnecessary stuff/weight to my bike on the off-chance someone else didn't prepare or just planned to mooch off others. "Failure to prepare on your part does not constitute an emergency on mine". We all ride bikes costing thousands. For the cost of a rear tire every rider can put together a solid kit capable of almost completely disassembling whatever they ride.
  18. BigWally

    BigWally Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2014
    Oddometer:
    496
    Location:
    Iowa
    I don't have a Felo but I like the angled handle. I use my little Titan micro-ratchets a lot ($10) but they have straight handles. I find I often need to use a short, and occasionally long, extension.
  19. Red liner

    Red liner Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 16, 2013
    Oddometer:
    319
    Yeah. The felo is more like an EDC for my motorcycle travel tool kit though. Should do well.
  20. brianbrannon

    brianbrannon They'll ride up with wear

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2009
    Oddometer:
    2,112
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    OIP.jpeg
    I use this all the time at work and on the moto. The solid end is great for saving the ratchet. VIM HBR3
    SmittyBlackstone and TinMan207 like this.