The Toolkit Thread

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by hilslamer, Sep 2, 2007.

  1. HellSickle

    HellSickle Scone Rider

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    I have some doubts. For their dirt bikes, all panels are polyethylene (PE) and polypropylene (PP) materials.
  2. Dirty bike

    Dirty bike EricV

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    I did forget KTMs dirt plastic. I was referring to most street bike body panels. All of my Yamahas have had ABS panels.
  3. ChapmanMFG

    ChapmanMFG Adventurer

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    Thanks for recommending our tools! We had a bunch of people visit our website from the link you posted, which is great because we're a small company and most of our new sales come from word of mouth! So happy you like our Motorcycle set. :1drink

    Joel
    VP
    Chapman MFG
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  4. Bob

    Bob Formerly H20Pumper

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    I just ordered a second Euro motokit!
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  5. currenv

    currenv Been here awhile Supporter

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    Not about a toolkit but about a specific tool...

    Has anyone used sockets designed to remove bolts with rounded heads? Something like this:
    https://www.amazon.com/IRWIN-HANSON-BOLT-GRIP-Extractor-394001/dp/B0000CCXVZ/ref=sr_1_10?crid=2Y11IMBK36J9T&dchild=1&keywords=stripped+bolt+removal+tool&qid=1590702195&sprefix=stripped+bolt+,aps,184&sr=8-10

    The P.O. of my 2014 Vstrom 1000 overtorqued just about every fastener on the front calipers and rounded off one of the 12mm head on one of the front caliper mounting bolt. It's bad enough that I can't get a grip on it with either a 6 point socket or box wrench. I'd like to avoid cutting the head off and dealing with that way it if I can.

    I've seen this type of tool in places like AutoZone -- I'm wondering if anyone has experience with them and can recommend any particular brand as working better than any other.

    Thanks,

    Vinnie
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  6. Trixie

    Trixie Adventurer in my own mind

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    I've had limited success with those. You're better off going small and tapping them on to get sufficient grip, or try a slightly small metric or imperial size wrench, tapping it on the bolt head. The bolt is junk, anyway, you just need to remove it.

    Can't reach with vise grips?
  7. TinMan207

    TinMan207 Most often a lurker... Supporter

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    Sorry Vinnie

    I can't give you much hope on any of the "bolt extractors" - at least the ones that I have tried.

    IMO it sounds like it's time to stop with being gentle and get a little "gorilla on" .

    As has already been said, the bolt is shot. Order a new one (or more than one if the PO wrecked others) Just get it out. I would use a good amount of heat to the bolt, and possibly penetrating oil, and if you have access to an impact wrench find an old socket and beat it on to the head of the bolt and try to hit it with the impact wrench.

    OR some big channel locks, or vice-grips, or if there is at least a couple of parallel flat sides one of those Kenipx pliers (the Big ones) that everyone has been talking about. Don't forget the heat.

    Be aware, that it could be that the PO didn't so much over torque the bolts, but PERHAPS he rode it in the winter and Salt got in there and froze the bolt in the caliper - that's why I suggested the penetrating oil. I live in Maine. Seen it more than once...
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  8. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

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    I have a similar set. This was my result. Admittedly a one time situation, and that bolt is still there.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
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  9. brianbrannon

    brianbrannon They'll ride up with wear

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    I use them, never tried cheap ones and they work most times. An impact wrench is usually needed
  10. RichBeBe

    RichBeBe All Hail Seitan!!! Supporter

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    I used one of them once when I went to remove the top shock bolt on a DR650 that a PO rounded. The bolt is shallow and would be a pain to drill and use an extractor. I bought one for $15 and put it on an impact and it came out instantly.
    Well worth the $15 for the lack of a hassle.
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  11. milzispete

    milzispete is it supposed to look like that?

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    Caliper bolts are normally torqued with loctite. The Irwin screw exractors work great in that application if used with a strike type impact driver (pic below). If you just try to wrench them off (against loctite) or use an impact wrench, there is a good chance the tool will just cut the bolt head completely round. (High torque, small head)

    Don't put heat anywhere near a caliper ( rubber seals)

    As a last resort, cut a slot in the head, half its depth and destroy a big screwdriver

    EDIT: don't use a strike type impact driver on non radial calipers. You will damage the caliper mounts.


    . 1137506.jpg
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  12. tag3

    tag3 Doofus

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    images (1).jpeg
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  13. currenv

    currenv Been here awhile Supporter

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    Thanks for the advice. Sounds like mixed experience on those socket things. This bike is from and usually lives in Mexico, so I don't think road salt is the issue. It's on a trailer right now being transported from San Diego to our home in Ann Arbor (long story related to Baja travel and the pandemic) and will go back to Mexico next time I do. Meanwhile, I get to use my garage here to take care of this and a few other issues.

    I put new tires on before the Baja trip and pulling the front tire requires removing the calipers. That's when I found all of caliper bolts and all of the disk pins were over-torqued. (I wound up just removing one caliper and I could sneak it out if the tire didn't have any air.) The caliper bolts (at least the three I could get out) had all been put in dry so the threads on the bolts are corroded and galled a bit which doesn't help with getting them out. I'm going to replace them all. The others were in so tight that I don't think any easy-out type extractor or left-handed drill bit approach would work -- and I'd be deathly afraid of breaking the easy out off and really being screwed. The caliper mounts to the fork so if mess up the threads by drilling in there I'll also be rebuilding that fork -- more reason for caution.

    Since I've got a better shop situation here than in Mexico, I'll start by soaking it day-after-day with Kroil. I might try one of these socket tools but if it doesn't break free after extended Kroil treatment, based on your suggestions, maybe I can trim up the head by judiciously using a dremel tool or angle grinder and trying an 11 mm six point socket.

    Fortunately, it's not an urgent situation since the brakes are working fine and have plenty of pad life left -- but I know I'm going to need to get that caliper off some day!

    Thanks again for the advice,

    Vinnie
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  14. Mercury264

    Mercury264 Once you go Triple...

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    Good luck Vinnie...please report back on how it goes. So many people ask for help and then never actually report back on what worked, and what didn't :thumb
  15. boulet_boulet

    boulet_boulet Long timer

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    The Japanese bike set lists Phillips bits. You might consider adding JIS instead as a lot of Japanese bikes call for these.

    Also, sorry about the dog. Looked like a keeper.
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  16. jwnsc

    jwnsc Hang in there. Supporter

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    I used an Irwin 24mm (15/16") bolt extractor and an air wrench to remove an oil drain bolt that a socket with
    18-inch handle, and a hammer and chisel couldn't budge.

    Took less than a second:

    Success.jpg
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  17. brianbrannon

    brianbrannon They'll ride up with wear

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    Modern quality screwdrivers work on both.
  18. ptgarcia

    ptgarcia Huh?

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    Not exactly. It depends to what specification that driver is manufactured. A true Phillips spec'd driver (can't remember the ISO number) will not work and will strip a JIS screw. You really need a JIS B 4633 driver or one manufacture to DIN 5260/ISO 8764 specifications.
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  19. THRASHED

    THRASHED In your helmet, no-one can hear you sing, I hope.

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    I have enough tools for m
    +1 on this. I messed up several JIS (Japanese Industrial Screw) heads before realizing they were actually different than a regular fastener. I make sure to keep one of each drivers in my kit.
    Luckycharms likes this.
  20. brianbrannon

    brianbrannon They'll ride up with wear

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    There's no longer a spec for JIS screws
    https://www.webbikeworld.com/hozan-jis-screwdrivers-review/