The Toolkit Thread

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by hilslamer, Sep 2, 2007.

  1. spokester

    spokester Long timer

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    This is a replica of the BSA/Triumph oil in frame toolkit. I have never seen an original. I bought this from Lowbrow Customs. The tubular "box wrench" was supposed to be 9/16" & 5/8", but instead is 13/16" and 7/8", making the spark plug wrench redundant. The slender ring 1/2" wrench fits the cylinder base nuts. Not sure what they had in mind with the tire valve stem tool, but it was part of the original toolkit. Perhaps to let the air out of your buddy's tires!

    1017211304_Film3.jpg

    [​IMG]
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  2. NoelJ

    NoelJ Long timer

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    https://www.amazon.com/Tubular-Span...I1QAU0,B08RBMRHQB,B07C96H1GF&srpt=WRENCH&th=1
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  3. draco_1967

    draco_1967 Spoon!

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  4. bwringer

    bwringer Gimpy, Yet Alacritous

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    Why was that in a separate thread?

    Anyhoo, I'd boil a pan of water, dip that ratchet handle in there for 30 seconds or so, and then pull that useless rubbery bit off. Easy, and saves a ton of space.

    As far as the rear axle on the Tracer; I have an FJ-09 (same bike/axles) and that recessed 27mm is a bear. I do have one of those axle wrenches; it is difficult, but not impossible to loosen and remove the rear axle nut. And you do scuff up the inside of the swingarm.

    I am considering buying a 90 degree deep offset wrench and slicing off the other end, or doing the same with a "dolphin wrench" if I can find a 27mm in the USA.

    That said, the actual need to remove the wheel on a streetbike is pretty rare. But I'd like to be prepared.

    I've also investigated using a 27mm oil filter socket (they're super-shallow, and have a 3/8" drive square) along with a 3/8" t-handle or L-handle. You could also grind flats on one of those oil filter sockets and turn it with an adjustable or open-end. Or maybe grind a slot and turn it with a tire iron? Not sure, but I'm exploring options in this as well.
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  5. draco_1967

    draco_1967 Spoon!

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    I just linked to an earlier post a few pages back in this thread.

    That's a good idea. I am planning to replace that with one of those shiny Nepros sliding T-handles.

    Those are some good ideas, thanks! Even if I don't ever remove the rear wheel, being able to adjust the chain if needed would be nice.
  6. solitary1

    solitary1 Long timer

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    Regarding removing the rear wheels,Rally Raid Products make a wheel wrench to remove the wheels from a T7 which also has the recessed nut on the rear axle,might be worth a look.
  7. smackyface

    smackyface Boldly going wherever Supporter

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    I personally base my tool kit around getting to the next hardware store. You can limp a loose chain to the next town to buy a wrench and adjust it, but I would never travel without the ability to repair a flat tire.

    For the socket, do you carry anything else you could use as a breaker bar? For example my bike has a torx T50 that I've had to remove on the trail. I can get it by using my trail stand as a breaker bar on a small sliding T-handle. Or, Motion Pro makes a ratchet that fits in their combo 24mm wrench / tire lever.

    I don't remember if it was this thread or another one, but somebody clever suggested cutting a short length off a larger allen wrench and turning it with a box wrench. So you could cut a couple inches off that 14mm hex key and turn it with a 14mm wrench if you carry one.
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  8. draco_1967

    draco_1967 Spoon!

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    That's a good idea to use a trail stand for a breaker bar. If I want the ability to remove/change a tire on the Dirt Ninja, I'll need a trail stand since it doesn't have a center stand. There aren't any other fasteners that I can think of where I'd need a breaker bar other than the axles.

    Good point about the chain too. Getting to a hardware store wouldn't bee too much of a challenge...

    Thanks!
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  9. PineyMountainRacing

    PineyMountainRacing Oops....

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    sometimes finding a store that’s open can be the challenge, depending on where and when you are traveling.
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  10. Mad Matt

    Mad Matt Adventurer

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    The duplication is so obvious now that you pointed it out.... :doh
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  11. oPAULo

    oPAULo jack of all terrain Supporter

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    Since the toolkit thread has mostly run its course, and every current tool has been discussed ad-naseum, should we discuss toolkit supplements like first aid kits? My first aid kit is a direct extension of my toolkit. Foolishly I'm sure, the toolkit takes precedence, but the first aid kit still gets packed somewhere in the bottom of the backpack. Like, ya, I got a bandaide. You need dental floss?? Hang on....I got that! Nail clippers? Yup. Nail polish? Wut?? Tums, Ibu, Tyl, all important and can save a weekend. What do you carry?
  12. RustySpokes

    RustySpokes Ordinary average guy

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    For fucks sake @oPAULo I haven’t whittled down my 20# tool roll yet and you want me to add Tums and nail polish to my pack?
    :becca
  13. Whiteeyelashes

    Whiteeyelashes Been here awhile

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    No nail polish, but I got crazy glue!
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  14. ZanderMan

    ZanderMan Needs monitoring

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    Don’t you think some items made for larger wounds (even puncture wounds) and breaks would be in order? Even a finger splint or two?
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  15. ZoomerP

    ZoomerP Long timer Supporter

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  16. robsmoto

    robsmoto Motorcycleton

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    The comment about nail polish was interesting. I carry a small first aid kit in my tank bag. This consists of eye drops, a bit of alcohol in a small dispenser, a few bandaids, some antibiotic ointment, and a small dispenser of liquid bandage. The liquid bandage is useful when a bandaid is not going to stay put. For example, the small cracks that develop about the thumbs and fingers in the winter, for a little blister on the finger or toe, and other small cuts. The liquid bandage stuff is applied with a small brush and then dries in a couple of minutes. It smells just like clear nail polish. I get mine at a chain drug emporium (e.g. Walgreens).
  17. Trixie

    Trixie Adventurer in my own mind

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    and it burns like a motherfucker on open wounds...
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  18. oPAULo

    oPAULo jack of all terrain Supporter

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    I have that in my toolkit but have gauze packs in the first aid kit. They could be used in conjunction for gaping wounds. A silky saw and a couple tree branches combined with duct tape would make the perfect splint or if there's no trees I could use the trail stand and poop trowl as a splint. But that's worst case scenario. I can't even remember all the stuff in the first aid kit. There's dental floss and tweezers and scissors and a bunch of stuff. I should revisit the first aid kit.
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  19. ZoomerP

    ZoomerP Long timer Supporter

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    [​IMG]

    Make sure you get the P variety. When applied to dry skin, it won't release for days; even feet. Very physically strong, too. I once made the mistake of wearing trailrunners while hiking through some fine Utah sand, and it chewed my feet up badly. Leukotape P saved that trip for me. I've never used anything that's even remotely as tenacious and protective.

    The adhesive must be sensitive to air or something, because it loses its adhesive properties when taken off the roll and wrapped around something else for storage, as is commonly done with duct tape. I've applied some of the waxy liner paper from stickers to it so I don't have to carry a whole roll, and that seems to keep it fresh.

    Here's an article on its use:
    https://andrewskurka.com/quick-tip-field-friendly-leukotape-strips-for-foot-care-first-aid/

    Also, an article on assembling a UL first aid kit:
    https://andrewskurka.com/gear-list-backpacking-hiking-foot-care-kit-blisters-maceration/
  20. ZoomerP

    ZoomerP Long timer Supporter

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    I think a number plate or some other bike plastic could be used as a splint.