The Toolkit Thread

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by hilslamer, Sep 2, 2007.

  1. PackMule

    PackMule love what you do

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    Interesting mix of reviews on that bag at the Aero site. I've never seen one in person...

    One thing I didn't notice was whether it had an integrated water bladder system (or accommodation for same). :dunno



    The more I think about it, the more I'm interested in a webgear style system. I came across a tactical pack in one of our catalogs at work that I may inquire about. Of course, it costs 3x what it should because it's for public safety. :rolleyes
    #81
  2. Speaker

    Speaker Been here awhile

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    If you want that kind of thing, look at Blackhawk Industries hydration systems. The "Matrix" look likes it fits similar to that Kriega things.
    [​IMG]

    A few of their packs have MOLLE webbing on the outside for attatching other pouches.
    #82
  3. PackMule

    PackMule love what you do

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    I was thinking more something along the lines of THIS.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Keep the weight low like a fanny pack, but with a spot for a water bladder. Big thing for me, too, is torso height adjustability. But damn, they're expensive. :bluduh


    Something good old like this could potentially work, too. Just need to integrate a camelbak to the back (and ditch the side canteen holders)

    [​IMG]
    #83
  4. Speaker

    Speaker Been here awhile

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    #84
  5. SAWBONES

    SAWBONES Chicken Rider

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    The trouble with the backpack-style of toolkit carry is that tools tend to be hard, and I don't want to fall onto anything hard that's attached to my front or back!
    #85
  6. nfranco

    nfranco over macho grande?

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    #86
  7. KingRat

    KingRat Retired and Grumpy.

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    #87
  8. Speaker

    Speaker Been here awhile

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    That beast is the small? I can't fathom what the large one looks like.
    #88
  9. KingRat

    KingRat Retired and Grumpy.

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    Ah, ambiguous post, sorry.

    The big satchelly thing with the handle is 12"x9"x5" and all the stuff goes in it.

    The tool roll itself folds to about 7"x5"x3" with all the tools shown in it.

    For scale, it's a 6" adjustable spanner.

    [​IMG]
    #89
  10. dseric

    dseric Living for Adventure

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    I found this Gear Wrench small compact kit that is great for shorter trips. It covers most of what you need and Torx bits too up to T50! The only mod I had to do was replace the SAE Hex bits with metric ones. I picked up a small set from Ace for $4(2.5-8mm). It's $20 @ Lowes and $25 @ Sears. Even has some SAE sockets if needed.

    Pic:
    [​IMG]

    Metric set from Ace:
    [​IMG]
    #90
  11. PackMule

    PackMule love what you do

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    Found a reasonably good deal on one of these on ebay (still over $100), so I'll report in once I get it and get it set up.

    :lurk
    #91
  12. AntWare

    AntWare Lost In Translation

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    PM, have you tried one of the Ogio Flight Vests?

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Goggle Pockets
    Multi-functional Pockets
    Magazine Pocket
    Internal Zippered Pocket
    Tool Organizer Panel
    Cell Phone Pocket
    Back Storage Areas
    Hydration System pocket in the back
    Weight 3.44 lbs or 1.56 kg
    #92
  13. PackMule

    PackMule love what you do

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    Interesting. Haven't seen one of those in the flesh. Anyone here using it?


    Maybe I'll check it out if my webgear never shows up. I haven't heard from the seller since I sent payment. :uhoh I'm giving him the benefit of the doubt right now since his address was outside of LA that he's somehow displaced by the fires. Hopefully neither my money nor my vest have gone up in flames.



    Thanks, Ant.


    Nate
    #93
  14. neduro

    neduro Addict

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    Lots of folks. But they are backordered right now. :bluduh
    #94
  15. PackMule

    PackMule love what you do

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    Backordered is better than "missing and possibly incinerated (along with your $120)". :bluduh
    #95
  16. the brother in law

    the brother in law adventurer

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    Great advice from hilslamer!:clap

    Anyone who is even considering any sort of genuine adventure ride or extended off road ride should carry some sort of variation of everything that is listed. Really. Sure, some things may seem overkill, but you may be surprised to how messed up stuff can get off road, and thats when all this stuff really starts to make sense.
    Like he said, kits will differ between riders based on personal and mechanical differences (such as carry an epinephrine auto injector if allergic to bees, carry a 24mm wrench if thats what fits your rear axle) but what he has laid out is a well thought out kit, fine tuned after much riding experience. In the backcountry, away from AAA towing or medical help, improvisation and emergency repair will many times be the name of the game. I have raced enduros, desert, and hair scrambles. I have seen a broken arm splinted with a portable bicycle pump, have patched a hole in my crankcase with JBWeld, kept a muddy rim from spinning uselessly inside a flat rear tire with wire and zip ties, and used a 6mm allen wrench and 2 zip ties to replace a lost shock bolt while racing the Baja 1000. All these things would have been crippling without a good tool kit.
    Butt tool packs are an excellent option, although not the only one. Weight should not be a reason to not carry tools, for there are many good lightweight tools available, such as what is shown. That 6mm allen wrench mentioned above was part of a bicycle multi tool from a bicycle shop. His kit also includes medical and survival equipment, such as the emergency blanket. Sometimes help is a long way off, so be prepared. Go to WalMart and put together your own survival/first aid kit. My local military surplus store has all kinds of little bags, pouches, organizers for this kind of stuff for fairly cheap.

    Something I have found handy is an old mountian bike spoke. They have a little "hook" on one end, perfect for reaching into small areas to grab wires, zip ties, ect.:deal

    Also, a signal mirror is small and light, and can be seen for many many miles away. And, water purification tablets can save the day if stranded somewhere.

    Great post, thanks for all the time spent and for all the detail.
    #96
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  17. neduro

    neduro Addict

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    Welcome- nice first post!
    #97
  18. KCDakar

    KCDakar What are we waiting for?

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    Originally Posted by the brother in law
    Great post, thanks for all the time spent and for all the detail.

    +1:thumb

    I look forward to your next post!:deal
    #98
  19. PG007

    PG007 AKA backdoorphil

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    :lol3 I have a full toolkit INSIDE the bike (not in tank bags or panniers).

    "Everything" stays on the bike "All" the time, don't have to think of what extra is needed for a 200 km ride.

    I think the 100mm diam., alum., GT-Moto tool tube is excellent. Mounted low down on the engine sump guard (in front of the engine) , it enables all the heavy tools to be carried safely, low down, making the best use of the C of E. Even has a hex set screw in the screw cap as a lock.
    Home-made plastic drain tube will work.

    In the tool tube goes :

    small vice grips (great lever backup)
    wiha screwdriver, hex & torx bits to fit all bolts (LOTS)
    3/8" socket handle & socket fit the wiha bits
    large adj wrench (more than 1" capacity)
    small adj wrench
    spark plug socket
    LOADS of wire ties

    Under the seat goes:

    jump leads (no kick start on the Dakar)
    full set 3/8" metric sockets with small 2" ext
    iridium spark plug

    In the rear comptmt. goes:

    spare clutch lever with spare screw-on ends
    spare bulbs
    spare fuses
    spare bolts, nuts & washers
    tube repair
    small piece 200g & 600g sandpaper
    liquid steel epoxy (jb weld equiv)
    100cm 1/4" spectra line (800lb swl)-can pull/lift bike out of a ditch.
    self amalg tape.

    On the frame, tie wrapped goes:

    motion pro tyre lever/ 24mm wrench combo- duct tape elec tape rolled on the shaft.

    In the jacket pocket goes:

    the SOG muli tool

    Under the rear rack goes:

    21" tube stuffed under the rack...will work in the 17" rear in a bind.

    I can pretty much jury rig everything with this kit, its all about carrying the most sensible minimal gear.

    not much diff from other tool kits.

    for long rides ill put a scavenged 12v tire inflater in the tank bag & a medical kit (& a voltmeter)

    anything important missed?










    #99
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  20. RedHawk47

    RedHawk47 Adventurer Supporter

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    I read the entire thread and saw only one mention of an important and often overlooked tool.

    The first time I had a flat I discovered that I did not have a valve core removal tool - and none of the three people with me had one. Sure, you can change a tube without one, but it does make the job easier. We were able to remove the core using the tweezers from a Swiss army knife.

    Now I make sure that my bikes have at least one valve cap with core removing capability, plus a tool in my kit.
    SmittyBlackstone likes this.