The TT600 Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Zahnarzt, Mar 29, 2011.

  1. PropTP

    PropTP Been here awhile

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    I just looked at my own bike. The subframe/oil-tank mounting is slightly different from yours, so you'll probably have to loosen those too.
  2. tscham

    tscham Adventurer

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    Thank you for your reply and for the photos!

    In my case, I must unscrew some of the bolts on the oil tank, as they attach it to both the main and sub frames. Hopefully, I just have tu unscrew those (+ check the margin for some cables) and the whole rear subframe will pivot with the airbox attached.

    Will try to take pictures of the process and maybe open a small thread here with a quick tutorial.


    Thank you for replying!

    Yes, happy the rear subframe is removable. Hopefully it's easy to take the whole thing out.

    Yeah, I'll have to unscrew the rear subframe mount of the tank.
  3. tscham

    tscham Adventurer

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    All went well getting the rear subframe a bit out of the way (will leave a quick tutorial with photos). When I checked the carb, I immediately realised my luck:

    IMG_20200606_195852.jpg

    @stteve, you were 100% spot on. There was the needle...

    IMG_20200606_200059.jpg

    Like, what's the probability??

    Given this unfortunate event, can you guys please tell me if the main carb's needle on the TT600RE is exactly the same as on the XT 600 E? Or else, if any of these kits' needles would fit my bike?: kit 1 kit 2

    Thank you very much!!
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  4. dzl

    dzl adventurer wannabe

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  5. tuscan

    tuscan Been here awhile

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    Hi - you don't need to touch the two upper bolts on the oil tank circled in your picture - just the bottom one where it touches the frame.
  6. tscham

    tscham Adventurer

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    Thank you for your insight!!

    Aww, bugger... The cheapest ones I see are 50€ + shipping... Do you guys know of any online store in Europe with cheaper prices for this king of parts?

    Thank you! Had already done, as previously posted, but thank you anyway.
  7. OzCRU

    OzCRU Long timer

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    @tscham thanks for the links to those carb kits. Handy for my XT :-)
  8. tscham

    tscham Adventurer

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    Profiting from other people's digrace :lol3:lol3:lol3 No, very glad I could help. You guys have helped me A LOT already!!
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  9. tscham

    tscham Adventurer

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    So, as promised, a very short tutorial on how to more easily remove the carburettor on a TT 600 RE:

    1. Remove the throttle cable ends from the carburettor and loosen the carb boot screws on both sides of the bike:
    IMG_20200606_1804492.jpg

    2. Get the main wire harness loose from the claw:
    IMG_20200606_180502.jpg

    3. On the right side, remove the screw that holds the rear brake oil reservoir, tape the reservoir to the frame so that it stays upright, and remove the screw that hold the airbox to the main frame:
    IMG_20200606_182418.jpg

    4. Remove the breather from the airfilter box (loosen the clamp first):
    IMG_20200606_182727.jpg

    5. On the left side, remove the screw holding the oil tank to the rear subframe:
    IMG_20200606_183452.jpg

    6. Disconnect the (rear) break light sensor:
    IMG_20200606_185035.jpg

    7. (1) Loosen (do not remove) the bottom 2 bolts that connect the subframe to the main frame, on both sides; have something ready to hold the subframe or keep it from falling, as it can only pivot a few centimetres in order not to pull any wires from the harness or the battery!!; (2) while holding the rear subframe, carefully loosen and remove the two top bolts:
    IMG_20200606_180443.jpg

    8. Carefully lower the rear subframe, pivoting on the bottom two bolts, check if no wires are being pulled. After lowering the subframe to a distance that gets the airbox side carb boots out of the way, secure the subframe in order to keep it from falling more:
    IMG-20200606-WA0016.jpg

    Attached Files:

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  10. tscham

    tscham Adventurer

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    9. Remove the top-middle and left side breeder pipes from the carb:
    IMG_20200606_185646.jpg

    10. Finally, remove the carb. It will come out on the right side of the bike. You need to pull it as far back as possible, getting the carb mouths out of the intake boots. Then, you gently rotate the carb block to the right and towards the floor, until you remove it entirely:
    IMG_20200606_190432.jpg

    Good job!


    Re-fitting the carb is the exact inverse process.
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  11. OzCRU

    OzCRU Long timer

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    Nicely done :-)
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  12. RSV

    RSV n00b

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    Hi TT people,
    after 20 years of riding street bikes, i have decided to try to get off the pavement...
    Ive never ridden any off road bikes of any kind (once a friends Yamaha DT some 20 years ago, when i had a TZR), so im a tabula rasa.
    I like the TT600, seems like a good choice for a first off roader, cheap to get and run, but i need someone with a lot more experience and knowledge to confirm my choice.
    I will use the bike around town a bit, and occasionally i would like mi missus to ride pillion. Very occasionally though. But i would like to go to the woods and hills around town on weekends. A friend has a small motocross track built and he is using CRF 450, 250 and some KTM i didnt recognise. I know the TT isnt in the same class as those bikes, but as i said, im looking for a compromise that can be used around town and in the mud and gravel etc...
    I was thinking about an XT at first, but i didnt need much reading up to see the XT is basically a town bike. Can the TT cope with same occasional trashing on the track (a couple of jumps) and some not so hard off roading?
  13. tuscan

    tuscan Been here awhile

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    If your off-road definition is un-sealed gravel roads, then anything will be fine up to say a 600/650 to start with - just take it easy over loose surfaces. TT600, XT600, DRZ400, DR650, TTR250 etc.

    If however you want to venture onto single trail tracks with challenging undulations, surface irregularities, loose rocks, ruts, sand, mud, water etc of varying difficulty, then get a small cheap bike that you can fall off a lot without hurting you or it. A big heavy TT600 is not one of those - you will hurt yourself.
    (The TT600 is a great bike and is close to my ideal all rounder and will do it all - it's just too heavy to learn full off-road on IMHO).
    I suggest something like an XR200, XR250, DR200, DR250, TTR250, CRF230, TTR230 etc.etc. These are all cheap, have good parts supply, are generally bullet proof, docile and easy to pick up when you throw yourself and it down a hill and will probably not suffer too badly from the experience of a ham fisted first forray into the dirt. You will fall off ..... a lot. But it's fun doing it.

    Go find some area where you can experiment (preferably with soft ground and not many rocks) and go with some like minded mates and have some fun. Learn to stand up and ride slowly over everything, through everything, up things and down things. Learn how to accelerate, brake, change gears and balance while standing up. Learn how to fall off away from your bike and not under it. Keep the speed slow until your confidence builds - as a wise man once told me "Fast is for experts and idiots only"....

    Most of all learn to have fun while learning and enjoy the world of the not so flat earth...

    If you want one bike to do it all to start with.... road, gravel, single trail, then you wouldn't go far wrong with a TTR250. There is an excellent thread on here with some good advice..

    https://advrider.com/f/threads/the-australian-yamaha-ttr-250-thread.907085/

    Edit: Another good alternative for an all rounder is the WR250R..

    https://advrider.com/f/threads/yamaha-wr250r-mega-thread.329337/

    And by the way get some good MX boots, a decent helmet and some gloves and wear them all the time.

    Good luck.
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  14. Ian_TT

    Ian_TT Adventurer

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    IRC did every variations, swing up/down or remove the subframe completely, with or without the airbox. that's the beauty of the TT-R/RE. Very few parts, easy to work on.
  15. RSV

    RSV n00b

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    I was afraid the answer will be something like what you wrote Tuscan. Its too heavy.
    The problem with the CRF 250 (and that is the only model from your list that is commonly available in Croatia) is that its too slow for regular road use. I cant see myself doing 150-200 km (a trip to the mountain part of the country from my city is something like that) on a 250.
    I have a chance to try a CRF, and ill definitely do that and see what it feels like. Only thing im worried is that the TT that has appeared in our local classifieds will be sold soon, its the only one available at the moment.
    Thanks for the answer.
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  16. jjxtrider

    jjxtrider questionable

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    DRZ 400 ? Bit lighter , more power than a 250 , can handle offroad and pavement equally . Not a powerhouse but pretty good , not an mx bike but good enough.
  17. Tritwin

    Tritwin Been here awhile

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    6958CDE9-B672-49A3-BF20-0CF1D06B97CA.jpeg Grimsdalen, Norway with new waterproof bags from Nelson rigg
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  18. crazybond700

    crazybond700 Adventurer

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    Hi guys.
    I have a 1997 tt600e belgarda, and during a hasty job trying to get the bike started i ruined my starter switch. I have a universal replacement for now but it sucks. Are those buttons available?
  19. crazybond700

    crazybond700 Adventurer

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    Who knows the name of the designer of the carb setup in the tt600e? Can we collectively send him or her a trickload of horsecrap? Every couple of years when you want to take the carbs of those intakes are rubbish
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  20. crazybond700

    crazybond700 Adventurer

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    You can do all kinds of stuff with a tt. I rode and endurance race with it, 5k in finland offroad tour with lugage. Its not perfect for all. Too heavy for heavy stuff but nice for easier stuff and allround. Endurance race had 2 mx tracks in it, and 2 tracks build on farm land the corn came off with obstacles etc. Definitly not the perfecf bike for it too front heavy. Buy a tt and a wr450 or ktm 350 or so, hotmail or a 2stroker 250 like me

    Attached Files: