The Western Tattenback 2020

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by JMo (& piglet), Jun 24, 2020.

  1. boardforever

    boardforever Been here awhile Supporter

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    Will be following the ride report, and if the ducks fall in a row will meet up with you guys somewhere after Bend!
    #21
  2. philratton

    philratton Been here awhile

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    In!
    #22
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  3. James59

    James59 Adventurer

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    Hi Jenny

    Yes, I notice that you have cut back on gear. I am very much of the same mindset. I saw some overlanders and thought that’s too much stuff. Sure enough one of the bikes dropped and it took four of us to lift it. The tools evolution is exactly right, I use a similar set up. A mixture of Motion Pro stuff and some other stuff specific to my bike.

    I believe your ethos is right, just enough as necessary to be comfortable riding and very importantly sleeping, if I don’t sleep right I feel it very much the next day.

    I have seen the slide show, I had to slow it down and take notes as English is not my first language, but is very similar to Dave Lomax overweight is underprepared.

    Piglet is allowed of course.

    Heat-I don’t like the thick do all motorcycle clothes, although they are great the heat kills me and I like to be cool, so mesh is good idea. I use Adventure Spec , its lighter and easier to move around in.

    Tech-you need to carry it as its part of your job, I just carry a phone.

    I haven’t used mousses-maybe try, I am very careful about tyre pressure and check every day and keep a note to see if there is any changes-a forerunner of trouble..

    Giant Loop, I have a GL Tankbag and a Polish Horseshoe shaped bag, I have 3 drybags 1. Clothes, 2 Camping and sleeping 3 Cooking and spares inside the bag, it weight 18kg, though I could probably reduce the weight.

    Juan makes very good videos, I hope he is well. I was surprised how I came to broadly similar ideas on the other side of the world, well, what works works no matter where you are. Have a great trip and I look forward to reading about it.

    Cheers

    James
    #23
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  4. visualizerent

    visualizerent Raconteur

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    Kinda something like this...sorta. After day 4 it gets a little fuzzy lol. Juan

    Tatnback2.png
    #24
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  5. cobaltt

    cobaltt Adventurer

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    IN!
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  6. docwyte

    docwyte Long timer

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    In for more
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  7. James59

    James59 Adventurer

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    Amazing scenery. I have been to the Sierra Nevada mountains and it looks beautiful. I look forward to reading about it. Safe travels.
    #27
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  8. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    Hi James - yes, funny you mention Dave Lomax... for those unaware, Dave, together with Chris Colling (both of whom have extensive 'RTW' moto travel experience) started the UK Company 'Adventure Spec' around ten years ago now, as a portal to share their knowledge together with the import and distribution of higher-end tools, accessories and clothing into the UK and EU. Their ethos has always been to focus on the brands they themselves used and trust like Motion-Pro, Klim, Giant Loop etc. and more recently they've expanded by offering their own range of adventure riding specific apparel and luggage. A number of you will already be familiar with the Adventure Spec name here on ADVrider of course, as they also started the whole Race to Places YouTube series supporting Lyndon Poskitt, who in turn also provided them with some extensive real [round the] world testing of their clothing and luggage. Yes, it's a pretty small world amongst UK adventure riders and rally racers.

    Dave himself used to regularly present a packing light seminar at overland events: 'Overweight is under prepared' and I've done my best to continue his good work - while stopping short of cutting a toothbrush in half and drilling the handle to save weight (I'm not sure Dave ever actually did this, I sincerely hope it was just a joke he made at the time) - and I often acknowledge and quote him in any presentations I do, as two things he highlighted particularly stuck with me...

    The first is to prep your bike properly before you go... Certainly on a longer all-terrain trip such as crossing the United States on the Trans-America Trail for example, if you service your bike (eg. fresh oil & filter, clean air filter, and check coolant and plugs for example as required) - and you start out with a new chain and sprockets (steel teeth to extend wear, we're not MX racing here), fresh brake pads, and check your wheel bearings/seals (and consider replacing them anyway as a precaution before you go if you've already got some higher miles on your bike), then you ought to have little if any trouble for a good 12,000 miles at least - which is equivalent to half way around the world of course!

    This means you can avoid carrying a lot of those 'just in case' spares with you in the first place... and the same goes for cables and levers - a cable repair kit (a throttle and clutch inner, plus a selection of screw on nipples in a small tin) is far easier to stow than complete cables and housings, especially as you're unlikely to need them anyway... while strong back-bone style hand-guards essentially negate the need for a spare clutch and brake lever too - although since they are small and light, spares levers can be easily stashed in your luggage of course (or even zip-tied to the frame or forks somewhere in a rally stylee). It's worth noting that while you can always ride a bike without a front brake for a distance, some way to actuate the clutch really is necessary - particularly if you find yourself stuck in technical terrain.

    It ought to go without saying you should also start out with fresh [and good quality] tyres and tubes to give you the best chance of avoiding a puncture, and to maximise the time between them needing to be changed. Of course it's inevitable tyres are going to wear out at some point, so just schedule a change as and when - even to the extent of having them shipped to an address a distance ahead... As Dave likes to remind you, UPS and the like can deliver to every corner of the world these days, and certainly for a soft shandy like me 'adventuring' in the United States, any emergency spare part is a day or two away at most. With very few exceptions, RTW [style] overland travel is not a cheap undertaking anyway, so in the grand scheme of things, if something [that will do] is not available locally, and you want/need something specific, shipping it to you makes a lot more sense than hauling it along with you indefinitely*...

    *same goes for winter clothing in the height of summer, and any redundant maps - just send 'em home, along with a souvenir ;o)

    That way, all you only really need to carry are those things that will get you moving again if you have a mechanical issue or damage something in a crash... There is a reason people always suggest zip-ties and duct-tape, as they have a multitude of uses (both for your bike and your luggage/clothing - hell, duct tape and a tyre iron can even work as a splint if you've really made a mess of yourself!), and I'd add a tube of Quick-steel to that list, plus some wire and crimp connectors in the event you have an electrical issue.

    Combine those 'bodge-it' spares with some basic tools specific to the fasteners on your bike, plus some method of puncture repair, and you ought to be able to keep moving - if only to somewhere where you can effect a more major/permanent repair... This is also very much the mind set with rally-raid racing too of course - you only need to get to the end of the 'stage', then you can fix any more major issues in the relative comfort of the 'bivouac' so to speak.

    [​IMG]
    photo. fortunately my CB500X has plenty of space under the seat to stow all my tools and bodge-it spares and repairs - including a 12v compressor (in the larger Kriega pouch). The only other thing I carry is a spare 18" inner tube in a fender bag bungeed inside the front fairing side panel (this tube can be used as a keep-you-going spare in either the 19" front or 17" rear wheel), and means everything is always on my bike whether or not I have my main luggage bag fitted.


    Similarly, the other thing which I always quote Dave on is related to that same mind-set... If you consider that travelling any distance by motorcycle means you're almost certainly going to need to fill up with fuel at least once day, then there really is no need to haul a week's worth of food and water with you either... Even in remote Africa or Mongolia, if someone is prepared to sell you some fuel, they will also sell you something to eat (and drink) - after all, they have to eat too, and if they have fuel to sell, they will almost certainly have something you can eat too. Of course I rather pithily then counter this with "Personally I do not want to eat boiled testicles in a Mongolian yurt" - but the principle is that such interactions with the local people actually makes any trip far more rewarding; and ultimately if all else fails as Dave suggests: "If you're not prepared to dine on coffee and a crunch bar once in a while, maybe adventure travel is not for you...?"

    Now admittedly the route Juan and I have planned this summer is very much designed to dip in and out of civilisation on a regular basis, not least as we both like a hearty diner breakfast and a motel shower once in a while... In that regard there are people who suggest you can't have a [proper] adventure in the USA - but I respectfully disagree, and am reminded of something a friend said to me when I first started exploring the desert south west back in 2007: "You can ride an hour out of Las Vegas, and if you crash and you're on your own, no one might find you for days... if at all."

    Of course this trip we'll both immediately benefit in having a riding companion, plus we'll both be on the same bike (a Honda CB500X with the Rally-Raid wheel and suspension upgrades) making any trouble shooting far easier to diagnose, along with common spares and tools. We'll also have a bunch of tech between us (including a SPOT tracker, and cell service from multiple providers); and not least I'm delighted that we've already had a number of ADV inmates contact us to say they would like to meet up at points along the route, and even ride part of the way with us - which is fantastic, as I've always felt the CB owners and ADVrider community as a whole is designed to bring people together and enjoy what we do!

    So I'm going to sign off for now, as I'm still in the process of packing my camping gear and finalising my 'summer wardrobe' for this particular jaunt... Once I meet up with Juan on Wednesday, we'll aim to kick off the video series with an introduction to our route and a rough itinerary (which in turn ought to interest any of you wanting to join us somewhere along the way), and during the subsequent episodes we hope to impart a lot more information, if not actual wisdom ;o) - about what it is we like to do and how we choose to go about it.

    More soon! - see you here!

    Jenny x
    #28
  9. visualizerent

    visualizerent Raconteur

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    20200628_204632.jpg My packing takes several days. I'm going deluxe on this trip with Giant Loop Siskiyou soft panniers and a GL Tillamook dry bag.
    Fresh TKC80s, new chain, and a full service.
    We'll compare notes on the trail
    Juan.
    #29
  10. BornAgain

    BornAgain Been here awhile

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    Summer Wardrobe? Didn't know your RR would include a fashion show :lol3

    [​IMG]
    #30
  11. James59

    James59 Adventurer

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    Hi Jenny
    I have never met any of the people you mention, but I like to read. As I said I saw some overlanders on big BMW’s and I thought, no, that’s too much stuff. And great bike but too big for me, not my style. I am average height 175cm nice bikes, but still too big. I am also old, in my 60’s and I feel it but I have always had mini adventures from the 1970’s on my old Honda C50. I now have a 2017 V-Strom 650, as I don’t go off road often. I thought about a Rally Raid CB500X but too much trouble and money to import to China.


    I read Dave Lomax on HUBB and his overweight is underprepared and thought-this man knows what he is talking about, he has travelled and experienced life on the road. I like his style. He analysis a problem and comes up with a credible solution. Better to have one good pair of shoes than two cheap bad pair of shoes. Same with travel, better to have good stuff than cheap bad stuff. Also, I think there is psychology at play, people think I better buy it as it will make life easy-not necessary-consumerism and lack of confidence. And so, some people take too much stuff on their bike. The more you travel, the less you take! I think so.

    I have never been to a bike seminar, just read what other people do and I am old and so have enough confidence on myself. I am lucky in that I thought things through and haven’t made many mistakes (don’t want to tempt fate). I hope Dave was joking about toothbrush, you never know! I have a load of foldable Colgate travel toothbrushes-does that count?


    Lyndon also, he is an engineer and he has done the trips and also the races!. I have seen the detail he puts into his bikes and was astonished how good the workmanship was, also the thought and planning he puts into his bike is a great lesson.


    Maintenance-vital. It is a must. Before any trip no detail is too small. Never mind breakdown I am concerned about safety of me and other people and bike has to be safe and able to go the distance. Better a pint of sweat than a gallon of blood. Everything must be ok on the bike before a trip. Also, if something goes wrong I don’t want to sit and think..if only I had done this…If it’s been done then that eliminates that thought process. Get good mechanic to do it for you if you cannot do yourself. I am in favour of preventative maintenance, if something is going to go wrong and you know it is going to go, fix it before it happens. I am very bad and use a spreadsheet and Red Amber and Green system, I want to make sure everything is green before I go.

    Realistically as you said just enough to get you to a garage or help, you wouldn’t be able to build an engine in the desert, at least I wouldn’t.



    I didn’t know UPS can ship tyres to a destination, that is very useful to know. I start with new tyres but depending on distance travelled may replace.


    Clothing-yes, I went to Russia in 1978 and 1979 and had too much cold weather clothes, I posted them back home and learned to get my luggage down to 7/8kg. Russia in summer was boiling hot.


    Food-yes, people need to eat all over the world, and a bar of chocolate or packet of biscuits may be all that is available, but you’ll survive…I must have tea though!


    Never thought of a tyre iron as a splint-hopefully never need it! Good first aid training is useful, I did it in work for years and had to use it many times, it never leaves you and I carry a good first aid kit in my car and on bike, and when I travel. Mostly the travel is stomach related problems though I have been lucky and never really needed it, even in India. The hydration salts are very good, tastes terrible but well worth it. I take a big load of them but don’t put in Camelback or I have Kriega pack, use separate container like drinking glass or tea cup. I was thinking of a trip to Tibet. Difficult. One of my friends climbs mountains and he has been on Everest and goes to Nepal regularly suggested an oximeter to monitor oxygen in the blood. I have lung condition (never smoked!) so don’t know how I would cope with altitude.


    I have duct tape, cable ties and quick steel, also Loctite blue and green, but be careful of it. Wrap it well. Small container of grease is useful, copper grease also.

    I think you can have a great adventure in the US. I lived in San Francisco nearly 30 years ago and I had a Kawasaki and regularly went adventures before it was called adventures. I liked the Sierra Nevada/Donner Pass. You just need to fly over the country and see the landscape to know that you can have an adventure. Yes, you are right. If you crash you are on your own. Remember that pilot friend of Richard Branson, who died in an air crash they didn’t find the poor man for a long time. It can be dangerous.


    But, you can have a nice hotel and clean shower in the US very easy. Best of both worlds! Better than a bucket of cold water in the morning.


    I haven’t used a Spot tracker, haven’t seen one. I am sure there are plenty of local alternatives. It’s a good idea.


    Well, have a great trip and I look forward to the photos.
    #31
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  12. CaptCapsize

    CaptCapsize Long timer

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    For SatCom and SOS emergencies, I would suggest an InReach instead of a Spot. I have both, but gave up on the Spot in favor of being able to text via satellite with the InReach.
    #32
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  13. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    Hi Capt' - I should apologise for using 'SPOT' in the generic sense - yes, Juan actually has a Gamin InReach these days... although I notice that SPOT now offer their SPOT X model which has two-way texting as well.

    Jx
    #33
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  14. boardforever

    boardforever Been here awhile Supporter

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    Unfortunately previous plans, that I thought I could work around, are not going to cooperate, I'm going to have to enjoy this one from the computer. Have a great trip!
    #34
  15. visualizerent

    visualizerent Raconteur

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    20200629_215623.jpg
    Ops check good! (Got the charger too;-)
    #35
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  16. James59

    James59 Adventurer

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    I would need to check if they work in China, it may be made here, but working here is another matter.
    #36
  17. CaptCapsize

    CaptCapsize Long timer

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    I look forward to the the report on the scenic route you are taking.
    #37
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  18. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    Stand by for a video introduction - hopefully around lunchtime (west coast time) tomorrow, or certainly by tomorrow evening once we've got on the road... (and trail ;o)

    Jx
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  19. visualizerent

    visualizerent Raconteur

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    Testing out the load, and the microvlogging...Juan.
    #39
  20. veriest1

    veriest1 Minimalist Gear Hoarder

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    Subscribing! Love the video style too!
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