The woods are lovely, dark, and deep, But I have promises to keep

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by RiDR, Jul 13, 2019.

  1. RiDR

    RiDR Been here awhile

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    Hey gents, I recently moved from a big city to a town with access to some pretty remote wilderness area's. So I traded in my Wee for a WR250R and am finding my riding is taking me deeper and deeper into the bush.

    I see a lot of bear poop, big bear paw tracks, deer and moose, and also cougars have been spotted in town... which leads me into my first question.

    I'm riding a lot of rocky terrain and know how to fix a flat, but would rather not stop and get EATEN by ANIMALS :lol3, also the bike is a dual sport so that rules out Bib Mousses and the like, so other than carrying Zip Ties, anyone ever use Slime in their tubes? or should I just man up and stop being a pussy?

    Second Question, there aren't any dual sport riders here at all! No cell service in these remote area's, and there's a 40 Km trail I've carved out through remote forest on google maps. :lobby

    I know I shouldn't be out there alone but I can't stop damit! I know that anything can happen, bike could break down or even worse I could get knocked out ...

    Anyone else ride offroad alone? Any wisdom appreciated. :thumb
    #1
  2. el Pete

    el Pete toda su base

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    Stop being a pussy
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  3. Grestil

    Grestil 2+2=unicorn

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    I prefer the situation you describe. Wish I had your problem. I would take the same precautions recommended for hiking in remote areas. Bear spray or some other type of wildlife deterrent.:2guns
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  4. CaptCapsize

    CaptCapsize Long timer

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    A little 45cal bear spray and in InReach makes me feel a little more secure when riding remote and alone.
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  5. Rossland Rider

    Rossland Rider Been here awhile

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    Man up! If you are truly paranoid you can carry bear spray but unless it is grizzly country you don’t need too. In reach or spot however are IMHO essential if no cell service. Carry it on you,not on the bike if you are going further afield than you are willing to walk on a fractured femur.
    #5
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  6. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad Former World's Foremost Authority Supporter

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    You are far, far away from bears that will attack you as a source of food. The black bears in your region will attack out of defense if you surprise them, or get between a sow and her cubs. Most bear problem are related to hikers/backpackers not to motor vehicles. The bears will hear you a long time before you get close.

    Heavy duty (extra thick) tubes and plenty of air pressure prevents pinch flats on rocks. I carry a spare tube and a patch kit. First flat change the tube, after that start patching. Slime makes it difficult to patch. Bib Mousse or the like work well in the front on dual sport, it's the rear that heats and goes away with sustained pavement.

    In-Reach, Spot Tracker or similar device would be a good idea. Tree cover can limit signal strength with these gizmoes, but that also goes with Sat phones
    #6
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  7. Ua the Destroyer

    Ua the Destroyer Been here awhile

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    Also practice how to change those tubes at home so you are faster at it in the trail. Also slime in a tube has worked once before for me and riding buddies. Plenty of other times it hasn’t with tubes.
    #7
  8. PistonPants

    PistonPants Crankcase Scavenger

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    I never carry bear spray. I take an in-reach, tools, plugs, water and a snack. Tires run Tu-bliss with slime. I log a lot of solo miles in mountainous AK backcountry on both bikes and snowmobile. I am keenly aware of the consequences of fucking up. The best rescue is self-rescue.
    Peace
    Piston
    #8
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  9. Grinnin

    Grinnin Forever N00b Supporter

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    Black bears do not want to meet you. Or meat you either.

    Even the whole "between mother and cub" thing is not about black bears. https://bear.org/what-if-i-get-between-a-black-bear-mother-and-her-cubs/

    Prepare and eat food away from your tent. Make some noise while moving around the woods.

    My current avatar is a young black bear enjoying some hazelnuts in my yard about 3 yards from where I stood. Bear gave me a doleful look and galumphed off into the woods. We may have fewer where I live than where you live, but they're still here.

    Black bears are very easy to chase away.
    #9
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  10. CaptCapsize

    CaptCapsize Long timer

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    I have only seen one bear while out on the bike. He was a big cinnamon colored black bear. It did not run away, but watched intently as I rode by. I recited the Elwood Blues prayer, " Our lady of blessed acceleration please don't fail me now", and gassed it. There are no Grizzlies down here.

    The caliber of my bear spray is more for mules, not the 4 legged kind. Out here in the remote wild southwest, I have come across some unsavory characters. I suspect they were in illicit import business, based on their backpacks wrapped in black plastic and about the size of a bale of hay.
    Along the southern US border the government posts warning signs, concerning these type individuals.
    #10
  11. Bultaco206

    Bultaco206 Back-to-back motos suck Supporter

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    I’d say 99.99% of my riding is alone, with no cell service, (I can go days without it) and many miles to the next human. Because of that I carry everything I need to fix a flat, (long-time Slime user and believer) fix myself or someone else if I run across them, and hopefully my bike well enough to get me to help if I were to need it. That includes a folding hand saw.

    The bears in the northwoods of WI and Upper MI are more scared of me than I of them so carrying spray is ridiculous. My chances of hitting a deer on my bike (which I’ve done) are exponentially higher than having an issue with a bear. Hell, the black flies, mosquitoes, and ticks, are a far more worrisome foe than a bear is.

    Best things you can do are to stay ahead your bike maintenance, get comfortable with repairing whatever tire system you use...be it trendy or traditional, carry the basics with you, and never ride at a speed or over an obstacle that you would have you laying there for days, weeks, or months, should things go awry. In other words, don’t be a hero. Because no one cares. Save that to show off to your buddies when they’re along.
    #11
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  12. jay547

    jay547 Long timer

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    Regarding Slime: I don't put it in unless I have a flat. I carry a bottle and a small compressor. So far, it has gotten me home or back to the truck every time. Much quicker and easier than changing/patching tubes.
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  13. OrangeYZ

    OrangeYZ Long timer

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    When you work the tire spoons around the wheel, keep the wheel still and move yourself around it.
    That way your back won't be to one direction for too long and it will be harder for something to sneak up on you.
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  14. RiDR

    RiDR Been here awhile

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    Well after reading THIS I think I'll forego changing or patching tubes and carry Slime, or just zip tie the tire onto the rim until I'm "outta the woods"... literally.
    #14
  15. flei

    flei cycletherapist

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  16. cal08

    cal08 Been here awhile

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    My 2 cents: I ride in bear country as well. The last few years I have seen way more than in previous years. I think it's a real treat to see one. My approach is two fold: 1) give them time to move on to different areas by 2) not getting too deep all at once. So, each season I start off by whittling away at my area and slowly increasing my footprint. In the beginning of the season I work on skills such as obstacles and balance. The list is endless and I am never as good as I could be. so I try to take my skill development seriously. Later in the season, I balance my favorite thing to do: explore. This method keeps me busy and interested throughout the season. All the best.

    If your worried about flats, practice the change until it's a nailed skill set. I've seen guys who can do it in minutes. Knock on wood here, but in my lifetime of experience, bears are like seeing a 10: we sure wish they would pay attention to us, but they always just move on as they have way better things to do. With time, you will see that bears will just move on.

    Regarding the imagined catastrophic failure of your bike, leaving you stranded and a light lunch for Cujo the Bear: this is a very common worry and will remain so until you come to trust your machine. You have one of the most bullet proof and reliable machines ever manufactured. This worry will slowly give way, but you need to spend more time on the bike. Learn your machine and develop the knowledge and skills for its maintenance in the dead times when you might watch TV, netflicks, or God forbid, ADVRider.

    Resized_20190513_182507.jpeg Resized_20190513_182439.jpeg Resized_20180929_190825_8295.jpeg
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  17. RiDR

    RiDR Been here awhile

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    What a great post! Thank you. :beer
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  18. BywayMan

    BywayMan Been here awhile

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    A moose close up is more dangerous than a bear.
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  19. cal08

    cal08 Been here awhile

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    A scorned woman, more dangerous than a bear and a moose, up close. But that's another thread.
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  20. Blue Mule

    Blue Mule Persistent Slacker Supporter

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    :nod

    Actually, i'd be most worried about the Cougars he mentioned.
    Black bears? meh.
    Grizzly? ok...I see you.
    Moose? I see you too, move along.
    Cats? they do actually hunt. even if the numbers are low, they are the most likely to ruin your day of the critters listed.

    the biggest risk though, in his OP, riding alone and getting hurt.
    luckily, its the thing he has the most control over as well.
    Ride smart and carry a spot tracker if you're really in the boonies.
    #20
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