The XL600 thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Gregster, Jul 6, 2007.

  1. davek181

    davek181 Long timer

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    Mine will pick up the front wheel on a throttle roll on in 1st or 2nd gear. Second is best, I usually take off in 2nd anyway, it doesn't loft the wheel high in the air just carries it gracefully for 20 or thirty feet and touches down lightly. I find my self doing that a lot.
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  2. sh0rtlife

    sh0rtlife Long timer

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    ditto!!!!..and then ill do all the mods required to make it E start, ive oopsed a few intersections and had the front come up shifting into second and 3rd..it just doesnt take much effort on the street with good tires to bring the wheel up, never mind the lil cross ruts pushing it sky ward

    your interaction tho reminded me of my first big scare on my zr7s..this was maybe a week into riding street bikes aftter neerly 40 years in the dirt..got cut off and had to jam the brakes, i made that zr7 skid slide stop like a BMX ......it was only then that i realised front brakes do actualy get used hard on the street and not the rears

    i tell ya, going from always being on a dirt bike and having not but a couple weeks of paved riding on a dirt bike and then getting on a street bike was a huge eye opener on how things work in entirely different ways...it also changed my confidence on my dirt bikes including street use of them, carving tighter harder leaning deep into corners, it made everything new n shiney ...soo chrome
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  3. dixda

    dixda Been here awhile Supporter

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    I ride mine street too! Did a jaunt with a couple young fellas (one onna Bandit, the other a crotch rocket) and while on a section of 4lane hwy fell into a crosshatch for new pavement on the inside of our 2lanes at about 60-70mph. The guy on the Harley on the good asphalt outside let us by and turned off the road. We were only doing 100-120km
    and scared crapless doing crosshatch at speed and took the return to the good stuff head on and then enclenched our fears. The old 87 XL did better than I expected with a worn K60 Hieidie on the front a a new Shinky 270 kenda pattern on the back. Riding the tops of those grooves it ten times better than the wobble at recommended speeds LOL
  4. bork

    bork Been here awhile

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    Do these needles have any physical markings on them, so not to get in wrong side?
  5. davek181

    davek181 Long timer

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    the secondary needle has a lot less taper
  6. bork

    bork Been here awhile

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    I would think that equates to leaner advancement? I would have thought the opposite, having more taper/faster enrichment thinking the velocity of air is decreased when both slides are open and therefore needs less restriction on the fuel circuit, since the vacuum is decreased.(at lower rpm) :hmmmmm
    So no markings, I just need a good eye or 2.
  7. davek181

    davek181 Long timer

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    The secondary carb really has no idle or transition circuits, only the main circuit. The slide cutaway is different too, it is richer to help compensate for the missing circuits and enhances the transition a bit. The secondary carb doesn't need or want much needle flow till the carbs are more open. Think of it more as the second 2 barrels on a 4 barrel carburator, although I like to open them sooner and use them more than that. I had thought of drilling and tapping the secondary for the missing circuits and a slide change, but it seemed too much trouble and the staggered linkage was another obstacle to ovecome.
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  8. dixda

    dixda Been here awhile Supporter

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    I would think you did yourself a service by not changing what the engineers at Honda deemed acceptable for most applications.
    I had mine on the dyno for my elevation and haven't looked back.
    Trying to overclock some things opens up another whole can of worms.
  9. bearcat1

    bearcat1 Been here awhile

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    Got a quick ride in for some Autumn colors therapy, before the next rain cell blew in. Big Red 6 in it's natural environment. This old beast is fun chugging around the back roads at 45 mph soaking in the scenery.
    20211021_141621.jpg
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  10. bork

    bork Been here awhile

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    Beracat that's calendar stuff there! :nod
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  11. bork

    bork Been here awhile

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    Has anyone tried the silicone self stick tape for harnesses? If yes, did it hold up over a long period?
  12. sh0rtlife

    sh0rtlife Long timer

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    that is a beauty of a shot!
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  13. sh0rtlife

    sh0rtlife Long timer

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    ive been making and repairing harnesses since the 90s, originally i thought you needed "clean" wires and over the years ive actualy found that if they are a bit oily its actually easier, with that said, i dont do much for cleaning aside from removing anything caked on and a general wipes down and more often than not i build "new" harnesses from 90s honda civic and accord wireing harnesses, as its a plethora of colors and the lengths are longer than you will ever need in anything short of a 4dr 70s caddilac

    if your working with an existing harness, i highly recommend un-wrapping the whole thing HOWEVER you should wrap both sides of every split/junction point, after that gut it, wrap in with a few wraps any clips etc

    i wont use any other electricaly tape besides 3M brand, standard black electrical tape, anything else doesnt hold up, isnt "rubbery" enough etc..basicly you get what you pay for and the 3m stuff will last forever and will even hold up exceptionaly well in high heat as well as sharp edges

    the technique is simple, and most easily understood by slowly unwrapping any OE harness, basicly you need to pre-wrap 2 turns every 12 inches, wrap all 3 sides of a Y in a "weave" where you wrap the begining then across the back to the front, then over the leg, the wrap will want to do it on its own, use as little as you can to get the shape right, then starting with all of the short legs of the harness wrap them start a few inches from the end, wrap 3-4 times then continue on at a 45deg angle with about a 5mm overlap, keep the end your working on in a vice or a clamp or something as you want it held semi ridged, when you get to the end of the leg stop the same way you started.....when you do the "main body" of the harness do the same thing again, youve wrapped a foot or 2 i tend to sit on the couch with the finished end under my foot and just kick back wrapping away, this time when you get to a y you want to weave only on the main path of travel and get it tight into the corner, and continue on, end to end should be 1 continuous strip of tape

    if you want some pic's i can dig some up, ive got a finished harness for my lloyd sitting in a box, the harness i made for my xl6 looks as good now as it did when i made it 10? years ago
  14. bork

    bork Been here awhile

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    sh0rtlife, that's a big help! No pics necessary, your explanation, well done. Sounds like you should open a business for harnesses!
  15. sh0rtlife

    sh0rtlife Long timer

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    i actualy had someone drop me a 80s chevy 4x once that a shop never finished the engine swap on due to "missing parts"....he also wanted a painless harness put in, TBH i was astounded about what was missing(he drove the truck to them with the crate engine in the back), but the amount of work that went into that painless harness to get it to fit right etc i could have made a harness that fit better, for less, and looked OE, to put it bluntly painless is for the lazy idiots who dont know better, even the wire itself was cheep junk
  16. davek181

    davek181 Long timer

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    I have been doing engine swaps lately, putting common rail diesel engines in cars that I think deserve them. I have to build a harness that goes from the ECU to adapt to the car. I try to get as much wiring as possible from the donor car and add what I need for fuse blocks and etc. I use the same tape that VW and BMW uses on their harnesses from the factory. It is a semi cloth type tape that is ideal for harnesses. It is made by a company called Tesa and I buy it online for a reasonable price.

    3M super 33 is the best 3m tape and it is good and what I used to use, but now I prefer Tesa.
  17. sh0rtlife

    sh0rtlife Long timer

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    i know EXACTLY what cloth stuff your talking about, while i wouldnt want to use it anywhere chemicals and such are as youll NEVER keep it clean, it would be IDEAL inside the body, i know why you like it..its really nice stuff, i wasnt aware there was a source for it....thanks...now im going to have to get some for my lloyds as thats what they were OE wrapped with..and for something "vintage" its going to look more at home

    common rail as in 6bt? im assuming into 50-70s stuff?, last i checked 6bts were bringing too much money to even glance at but its been a while
  18. davek181

    davek181 Long timer

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    Common rail as in Volkswagen Diesels, 09 and on. Not too expensive to buy used and often get a whole wrecked car pretty cheap to get all the needed pieces. 2.0 4 cylinder with a ECU tune will produce in excess of 180 horsepower and 375 ft lb of torque. Got one in a Vanagon westfalia camper and a 68 Beetle that we dragrace as well as drive on the street. Takes a bit of headscratching to get one to run without the car, but they work well when you do.

    Most of the harness is inside, true, but the exposed parts are holding up really well too. I would argue that the Tesa tape glue is more chemical resistant than the 3M. You may be thinking of the old friction tape type stuff they used to use.
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  19. sh0rtlife

    sh0rtlife Long timer

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    ahh the vw side..id love to see the fit of getting one in a bug, your probably right on the chemical resistant side i was thinking more on the keeping clean side, but ive safely cleaned my harneses with brake clean and a rag with no issues, and it doesnt get worse than that in an engine bay, i have zero doubts about the cloth stuff holding up its GOOD stuff
  20. dixda

    dixda Been here awhile Supporter

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    I agree it's hard to find the old tape that stood this long for a harness designed for the elements, when you're just adding or cleaning things up and have used hockey tape in my youth.