The XR400 Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Hayduke, Jan 16, 2008.

  1. NSFW

    NSFW who else would love noobs? Super Supporter

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    afraid you will say that. thanks.

    i always keep spare cables for peace of mind and having them when needed without waiting for several days or getting stranded.

    well then to the flea market unless someone here offers me $. half the retail plus shipping cost.
  2. cmbthumper

    cmbthumper Long timer Supporter

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  3. saltyD

    saltyD Been here awhile

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    speaking of throttle cables.. rather than carrying a spare, I'm assuming if I break a throttle cable on my mikuni, then I can re-jig the remaining single good cable as the pull and remove the push to get me home.

    Is this correct? Are the cables interchangeable?
  4. cmbthumper

    cmbthumper Long timer Supporter

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    They are interchangeable on the sticker and pumper. Technically you only need one so unless your in BFE keep the spares at home.
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  5. NSFW

    NSFW who else would love noobs? Super Supporter

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    not sure what you meant by "interchangeable"

    the push and pull cables throttle ends on either stock or pumper are different.
    [​IMG]

    the pull cable has a bigger diameter threaded end, i guess in a pinch, i can use the push cable with a smaller end to fit inside the larger threaded hole of the pull throttle and jerry-rig it somehow.

    for simplicity and cost, really wishing hard that they are identical!

    on another subject, the difference between the stock and pumper is the cable "housing or sleeve" length. the cables themselves are almost similar in length.

    no issue here
    [​IMG]


    OEM on the left.
    [​IMG]
  6. cmbthumper

    cmbthumper Long timer Supporter

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    Holy caca I have to turn off my autocorrect. Sorry about that. It was supposed to read NOT interchangeable and stocker vs sticker. Glad I provided a links so I didn't have to buy you cables.

    Yes, totally sucks they are not cheap and I looked and looked but could not find what bike they would have came off to save a few bucks.
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  7. saltyD

    saltyD Been here awhile

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    ah - well that sucks, but it looks like you could jerry-rig the smaller end into the larger, as you say.

    Failure of the push cable is not really an immediate problem.
  8. cmbthumper

    cmbthumper Long timer Supporter

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    Going by memory but the arm plate that hold the cables at the carb should have enough material to make both holes the same size. Then use a steel or alum sleeve to take up the space for the smaller cable.
  9. Run Away

    Run Away n00b

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    Howdy gentlemen!

    I've got a '00 XR400 and I'm looking to make it street legal. I've been doing some research and most threads are much older, and the better kits (Baja Design) are no longer offered.
    Safety inspections here are pretty strict, so I'm looking to use all DOT approved lighting. The Tusk kits are not, so I'm not sure it's really cost effective to use them if I'm tossing half the components.
    I'm looking at a Polisport headlamp, K&S turn signals, and some sort of DOT approved taillamp. I may try to retrofit used OEM bits off a XR250, XR650, or DRZ400.
    K&S also make a light switch assembly that I hope might feel decent, I don't quite trust the cheap Chinese ones. OEM would also be nice if I could find it at a reasonable price.
    I'll probably get the stator rewound, Baja Designs still offers the service with a dedicated DC output. I'll have to make up a wiring harness and get some switches for the brake light.
    For gauges I'd probably get a Trail tech, maybe an XR250/XR650 speedometer for OEM cleanliness and reliability.
    I don't have a good solution for security/ignition/steering lock.
    Mirrors, horn, and tires are pretty easy. I'm budgeting about $1500 Canadian total?

    Anyone have some insight on how you'd do it in 2021?
    Or would I be better off selling and putting the money towards a CRF300L and upgrading the suspension later on.
  10. saltyD

    saltyD Been here awhile

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    Can I suggest if you're going to rewire, you just bite the bullet and go full DC ?

    I rewired mine using an off-brand 3-phase reg/rec for a KTM. Stuck it on top of the airbox and fed in the two phases from my 200W ricky stator. Ditched the mess of AC and DC split systems (my bike is AUDM which had all the street stuff on it) and put a capacitor on the DC line to smooth it out.

    I have a simple key'd ignition, switch has NO and NC circuits: NO turns on my main 12V relay to the battery, NC kills the engine (wired in parallel with the normal kill switch). Not very secure, but anyone who knows the wiring of dirt bikes could easily bypass anything you put in there anyway. Security if I need it is a disc lock and big F-Off chain in the rear wheel.

    The battery is optional - I don't currently have it installed - there's a main fuse from battery, then relay to the reg/rec and cap and forward using a single 12V line to a fuse box under my home made dash which then feeds out. I've used the coil ground point under the tank for a main star ground point, with another ground distribution for the front electrics at a bolt in the upper triple under the fuse box.

    My dash also has a USB charger socket which provides a digital readout of DC voltage and a trailtech for odo/speed/tacho. Mechanical speedo is goneski.

    I did make the mistake of putting a LED headlight on the AC circuit before I went full DC with fuses. My regulator (or the plugs?) failed open, it went over-voltage, then rather than a safe failure mechanism you'd get on a halogen bulb (blow), the LED went short and proceeded to burn out parts of the loom. Hence the rewire :)

    The OEM wiring harness is pretty simple, so I pulled it all out of the bike and rewired it completely.

    I did have a wiring diagram drawn up, but it got lost in a recent hard drive death.

    relay_reg.jpg fusebox.jpg dash.jpg loom.jpg
  11. Run Away

    Run Away n00b

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    Excellent, thank you for the insight! That's exactly the type of thing I didn't consider, and that totally makes sense.

    Just bought a used DRZ400 taillamp/mudflap assembly with a few turn signals thrown in, so I've officially committed to the project.
  12. Throttle&Clutch

    Throttle&Clutch Adventurer

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    Have a new to me xr400. So far love the bike, but not sure if I am pushing the suspension too hard or if it's just not set up right for me. Is there a setup guide for it?
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  13. Run Away

    Run Away n00b

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    Anyone here rebuilt their front brake master cylinder?

    Looking to buy a front master cylinder off a street legal model to gain the integrated mirror mount and brake switch. The XR400R oem service manual I found online states the bike has an 11mm bore, while I found this post saying they have a 12.7mm bore.
    Based on other service manuals I've downloaded, only XR250R also have a 11mm bore. I can't find a XR250L specific manual, but I'm guessing it matches the R model. CRF230F, XR650L, and CRF250L all have a 12.7mm bore according to the service manuals I could find.


    EDIT: Took a closer look at my bike. The XR400 has "11" cast into the master cylinder housing, and my CRF250L has a "13" cast in it, so I'm pretty confident it's 11mm without taking it apart.

    EDIT #2: hmm, all the used XR250L master cylinders I'm finding on ebay have "1/2" on them, which is 12.7mm. I suppose that makes sense, street bikes will need more brakes than dirt bikes...
  14. NSFW

    NSFW who else would love noobs? Super Supporter

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    your best source for the XR400 suspension is Thumpertalk.

    first, check the static and rider sags. that's a good indicator if you have too much or not enough preload, and proper spring rate.

    plenty of info on youtube.

    then, once you have the proper sag, do the clickers, rebound and compression. the XR400 forks are ok, i like mine even though it's not ideal.

    plenty of resources at Thumpertalk.


    my 2003 has the 11 casted.

    [​IMG]
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  15. NSFW

    NSFW who else would love noobs? Super Supporter

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    i found out have more stock oem spares in the garage, so i have 2 of each. just posted in the Flea Market

    https://advrider.com/f/threads/honda-xr400-oem-throttle-cables.1503753/
  16. molnar.b

    molnar.b Been here awhile

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    This made me think about my suspension. The rear shock on my bike was always too soft for my liking, can setting the preload and sag change that? I was afraid that my shock needs to be rebuilt, but hopefully that's not the case.
  17. saltyD

    saltyD Been here awhile

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  18. NSFW

    NSFW who else would love noobs? Super Supporter

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    i weigh 180 lbs and the stock shock spring is good enough since i like it plush. last weekend, i bottomed out the rear and bent the license plate...haha. yes, setting the sag will be my first approach, then plus or minus on the preload. if you maxed out the preload, it's time to get a heavier spring.

    i rebuilt my rear shock a few months ago, and i found out there is ZERO pressure in the reservoir (bladder). i never hear of anyone checking their reservoir pressure regularly...?

    get a high-pressure gauge tire gauge, the recommended pressure should be around 160 psi. i ended up putting together a Nitrogen Filling kit since i could use it on friends' and my other bikes.
  19. molnar.b

    molnar.b Been here awhile

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    I just checked the shock, the two threaded retaining plates are only ~7mm from the top end of the thread. No idea why hadn't I noticed it earlier, I had taken the rear end apart a few times before. If I had to guess this is why it feels so soft. I'll do some digging on the internet and then I'll adjust it properly after I've finished my exams. Also I'm just below 75 kg with riding gear on, so the stock spring should be fine with the proper preload.
    Thanks for the info!
  20. shinyribs

    shinyribs Thumpers for life

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    The trouble with checking the pressure in the shock bladder is there's so much pressure in such a small area that you lose a bunch of the charge just checking it. If you get unlucky and fumble the gauge house for a second or two you will have completely emptied whatever was in there.
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