The XT600 Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by CR_TurboGuy, Jan 21, 2007.

  1. tweemeter

    tweemeter Adventurer

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    Question about the xt600 different front forks throughout the years; i want to order a set of progressive springs for my 86' 43F, but i suspect the forks have been replaced by either 34L (this is what the brake says) or a 1VJ fork. This is because of the product number on the forks; y112, the only google answer i found for this was a xt600 1VJ fork on eBay. I also took out the old springs, which consisted of 2 different springs with a total length of 596mm, where the bottom spring is 460mm and the top spring is 133mm, total length includes a washer inbetween the two springs. My workshop manual says the length's are supposed to be different for the 43F, but it does have 2 springs with a washer, which i'm not sure the 34L of 1VJ does. I was looking at Hagon progressive springs, they sell a couple of different ones here in the Netherlands, a set for the 43F (84-86), a set for the xt600z (83-84) and a set for the xt600z 85-88. I have no idea which ones i have to order, does anybody here know the sizes of the springs in the specific forks? Or are all of them actually the same (which i thought at first, all xt forks are the same)?
  2. OzCRU

    OzCRU Been here awhile

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    I’m pretty sure I have 1VJ parts on my 90 model.
    Yamaha kept using many parts right through.
    So that’s going to throw you. Sounds to me that you have the 43F. How about a couple pictures?
  3. OzCRU

    OzCRU Been here awhile

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    Did a bit more researching for you @tweemeter - (Happy to be corrected by anyone else with better actual knowledge - I'm just googling.)
    34 L was the '83/'84 Tenere' model from a couple years earlier
    1 VJ was the Tenere' model of the same period as yours
    - so it makes sense that Yamaha shared parts between all these - for something like brakes I'd say they used the same calipers on all of these models at the time. Indeed one of the parts checkers lists the same front brake caliper for anything from 1986 - 1989 models.
    Is this your front brake?: https://www.ebay.com/itm/84-89-Yamaha-XT600-XT-600-Front-Brake-Caliper-WORKS-I1B3/372671986272

    Here's a link comparing the front fork tubes across different models (same ones that the brakes fit too)
    https://www.cmsnl.com/xt600-1986-43...l37992/tubeouter-1_43f231261038/#.XWThXOgzZXw

    & when I look at this pic: https://www.ebay.it/itm/182481023390
    of an 84 model 43F bottom yoke/triple, It looks virtually identical to mine on my 90 model 6 years later - I wuldn't be surprised to find out that it is the same :lol3

    So to me it looks like you do have '86 model 43F forks, that haven't been swapped over (with the two part springs as per the manual) that have just compressed a bit over the years & are now no longer the correct length spec

    Why don't you just ring Hagon & get them to help you sort it out? (check what their returns/swap policy is while you're at it)
    I'd be doing that & then ordering the springs for the 43F that it sounds like you have.

    Best wishes & post some pics when you get them & install so we can all see how you go.
  4. OzCRU

    OzCRU Been here awhile

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    On a different issue...

    Those who have Vapor Dash with Temp guages, what temp does your bike normally run at & what location is your temp sensor for comparison? I know that @jjxtrider has a fair bit of experience in this area. I'm sure there are a few others too & would love to hear a few results please.

    Since I'm rebuilding my bike from it's cooked pulse coil which would cause it to cut out randomly, I'd like to have an idea of safe/more safe operating temps & what might be considered 'getting a little too warm' to compare to when I get back up & running.

    I suspect that I may have been running too lean (but I'm not certain of this) which caused the excess heat which broke down the copper winding of the pulse coil causing higher resistance when hot to the point of losing spark when too hot, only to return to normal when it had cooled down sufficiently. Obviously I'm pretty keen to have a reliable bike & not repeat this experience in the future.

    Thanks in advance for the help! :-)
  5. jjxtrider

    jjxtrider questionable

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    I posted this pic in the past of where I found the best spot for the probe(6mm x 1.00) not the ring terminal behind the tach drive, Normal temps during summer heat(80-85+°F ambient air temps) gets to 265-275°F going steady 60-65mph and climbing to 300-310°F even, sitting in traffic or having to putt-putt for longish periods. Colder air temps drop numbers by 10-15°F. The probe location shows pretty much the hottest spot so temps do show higher than what is normally seen which is why I like the spot , lets a person know in real time at it's hottest point and is much faster responding than any other location.

    Attached Files:

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  6. OzCRU

    OzCRU Been here awhile

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    Thanks for reposting that photo, but also for including the temp info. Perfect.
  7. zap2504

    zap2504 Dave E.

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    Latest (and hopefully last) update on installing the TT600 chain protector on a '94 XT600E. Took a straightedge and fine Sharpie and marked a series of lines on the protector where I wanted to cut (based on verified measurements). Using a fine-tooth hacksaw, sharp utility knife and long bastard file I cut 2 2.5mm ledges in the top/bottom of the chain contact area to clear the weld bead on the top/bottom of the steel swingarm. Also needed to slightly enlarge the mounting holes to accommodate the mounting bolt spacers. The largest impediment to fitment turned out to be cutting the inside of the protector's front edge to 60mm wide as the XT600E swingarm does not taper to the swingarm pivot like the aluminum TT600 does. Once this area was enlarged the guide slipped on fairly easily. Still need to torque the bolts (need to look in the service manual; some fairly small value IIRC) but otherwise looks like I'm done.
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  8. Thomasrh

    Thomasrh Been here awhile

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    Hey XT600 owners I have some questions. I’ve been doing a fair amount of research on my next moto purchase and I keep coming back to the XT600. I’m already a Yamaha enthusiast having owned a XT225 and a SR400 but it’s time for something with a little more umph.
    So what are the main things to look at/be aware of when purchasing one of these 600’s? Things to do immediately after purchase? How’s this dual carb setup work and how is it for maintenance? Part availability in USA and foreign countries? Anything a new owner should know? Weakest points?
    I’m mainly looking at these bikes because they are air cooled and low seat heights. Also I’m tired of being limited to a 60/65 MPH range. I’d ideally like to have this bike for a Baja trip and then a TAT trip and then whatever else after that.
  9. Squily

    Squily Squily Supporter

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    my experience - things to check that costs lots to fix:

    • camshaft / head wear - there are no bearings, so you'll need to either replace the head or do a line-bore fir the shaft which is only a temp solution, but ok if you're not planning o do major mileage
    • rear shock - pretty shitty to start out with, so any bike with a rebuilt unit properly setup is a huge bonus.
    • alternator is pretty low-output, so check if all the electrics are functioning well - if not, you might have to get the stator rewound or replaced.
    • cosmetics - original plastics (and tanks) are getting dearer and hard to find, so if you want an original look, make sure its all serviceable.
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  10. OzCRU

    OzCRU Been here awhile

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    • Ditto above
    • Balance shaft & key are ‘tight’ - balance weight is an interference with the crank, so if you aren’t sure - get that key checked immediately. If it fails your bottom end will self destruct.
    • +1 on the Poor rear shock as above
    • Older bike now so parts availability is getting a little harder
    • (I’ve just replaced my Stator & Pulse Coil with a Chinese cheapy cause the original was over $400 to get rewound - OEM far more again - will let you know how that goes)
    • But it’s a simple & well known bike/motor with heaps of parts interchangeable with other year models - easily worked on (except removing airbox & carbs) & has a strong world wide following. An XT has probably been just about everywhere :lol3
  11. tweemeter

    tweemeter Adventurer

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    I'm taking my forks apart, anybody knows what this part is and how to get it off? My manual doesn't state it, but its for 43f and i think the fork is 1vj or 34L. Seems like it is metal, no ring under it to lock the seal so cannot take seals out.

    Attached Files:

  12. OzCRU

    OzCRU Been here awhile

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    From memory once I’d taken the dust seals off & the internal spring clip out of the groove - I then carefully clamped the lower leg in the vice & used the upper Stanchion tube like a slide hammer to firmly tap out the seal.
    I was a first timer doing it & it felt weird, but I got more confident as I saw it moving.
    I also remember making my own tool with a long piece of pipe & welding a large bolt with the right size head on it so I could use it to undo something inside the fork - but I’ve forgotten this bit. Yamaha have a special long tool for it but I had to improvise.
    I found this all out with google so maybe a search on here will turn it up.
    I’ll see if I can find more details again. Others will no doubt chime in & confirm or correct me - you should check me too
  13. OzCRU

    OzCRU Been here awhile

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    @tweemeter
    Try this - Googles “how to change Yamaha xt600 43f fork seals” & got a few YouTube links. Skimmed this one & at one point he’s talking about the very tool I just described with the fork leg still assembled so hope it helps:
  14. zap2504

    zap2504 Dave E.

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    ^ I believe you are referring to the Allen-head machine screw and copper washer in the bottom of the fork leg. This needs to come out before you pull on the fork tube. The "tool" is supposed to keep the internal rod from turning with the Allen wrench but you can usually get the machine screw out by using just an impact wrench and Allen bit - remove the top cap to drain the fork oil, but reinstall the cap to keep the spring inside until you remove the Allen-head machine screw as the spring helps keep the rod from turning.
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  15. OzCRU

    OzCRU Been here awhile

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    @zap2504 Yes - That's it. I didn't have an impact wrench & I was geting it spinning on the inside (but I hadn't put the spring or cap back on to see if that would have done the trick) - anyway, as I said I did have a welder & a bolt so I guess whatever works :-) - Thanks for jogging my memory.
  16. jjxtrider

    jjxtrider questionable

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    I've always used a broom handle pressed against the wall and an impact on the allen bolt at the bottom , hasn't failed yet even with usd forks . The impact spins it tight on assembly without needing the broom handle.


    .
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  17. tweemeter

    tweemeter Adventurer

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    I know about the bottom bolt, took care of it with a drill because even the dealer couldn't get it loose and gave up so the damper rod is out of the fork, but this ring is on top of the dust seal / part of it, and i can not slide hammer it out because i haven't been able to get to the snap ring on the seal.
  18. jjxtrider

    jjxtrider questionable

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    You sure that isn't the wiper itself ? You can take a flat screwdriver and sort of chisel it out . wrecking it wouldn't be a concern since a seal kit comes with a seal and the outer wiper .


    .
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  19. webbpinner

    webbpinner Adventurer

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  20. hobes

    hobes Adventurer

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    @tweemeter

    it's a dust seal (Number 8) you can seperate it carefully with a chisel or something like it
    The pic is from a partslist for the 34L

    Gabel 34l.jpg

    just saw that the question was 3 weeks ago, so the answer might be a little bit too late......