The XTZ750 Super Tenere

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by ralogan, Jan 24, 2002.

  1. yamalama

    yamalama wet coaster

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    don't buy a "rotter". you will regret it.
    if you are riding 2 up, tarmac only, i might look elsewhere, not that the bike isn't capable.
  2. Bowler

    Bowler Been here awhile

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    I'd say a TDM850 is more what you are looking for. They are a bit less expensive as well (at least in NL).
    60k km is no problem for a XTZ750 (or a TDM850). They are good bikes/engines, but do require maintenance and the checking of a few possible issues.
    3TD00900 likes this.
  3. CorriganJ

    CorriganJ n00b

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    No aiming to get a nicer one. Was just remarking on the prices to see if anyone reacted "wow thats cheap / expensive". Why would you look elsewhere? Perhaps I'm making a mistake choosing a bike on looks, but its just such a cool bike.

    Yeah I just don't like the looks of the TDM850, unfortunately... Well. I don't know. I want a bit of an all rounder... Something for city streets and mountain twisties. For having fun and for taking the Mrs out into nature for a hike (we don't have a car).

    've been touring on a 125cc (including short trips 2 up) so... I think anything will be better than that. That said, 17" wheels and a lower center or gravity might be good for me? But then, the larger front wheel will be great for hopping up kerbs in the city. Its a tough one!
  4. GuidoHL

    GuidoHL Adventurer

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    Was going to agree with the earlier comments - that you could choose a better (newer) bike until I saw your comment "but its just such a cool bike."
    That's a whole different story, if that's what appeals then go for it. I had one in the UK in the early 90's and took it to France and Spain with a couple of mates on CBR600 (hurricane models). Easily kept with them on the road (mental in the Pyrenees) and when we took the back road up the mountain to the cable car (Monte De or Fuente De?) got to spend some relaxing 'my time' while I waited for them to arrive!
    The exact model (1990 black) came up here in NZ a year or so ago and grabbed it for NZ$3.8k (about Eu$2k?) It's a UK import so potentially the same bike with 27K miles on it.
    Definitely slower than modern 750's but smooth tractable engine is great. Centre of gravity is low and always found this bike great in slow London traffic. I've fiddled with mine - changed pipe and fitted CRF450R front end with oversize disc as the original forks are spindly and brakes are poo. Easy to work on if you're able. Just done valve clearances on mine. They like firm gear changes otherwise they can jump out of gear under acceleration - particularly 1st to 2nd. So if you ride one and notice this it's a characteristic rather than a fault. I'm going to fit needle bearings in the linkage of mine to see if it improves.
    So back to my original point - if old school cool is what you are after then go for it. Will be great two up, I'd leave front wheel as this gives you more options should you encounter gravel roads and is fine on road unless you are after sport bike handling. Spend what you can up front but they are reliable - have been a couple more come up for sale here with 100K on the clock.
  5. GuidoHL

    GuidoHL Adventurer

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    Oh, and agree - the TDM is a very plain machine.
  6. OldDutch73

    OldDutch73 n00b

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    Few weeks ago made the decision to keep the current wrap that was on it when I bought it. But still wanted to cool livery of the Sonauto so combined the two. She is now at the dealer getting a big inspection / maintenance; brake discs, chain, valves alignment, distribution chains, crashbars, fluids, etc. So when the weather improves (pouring rain in the Netherlands most of the days now) But ready for the season, my first spring on a motorcycle.

    999C34CA-9C38-45B2-A509-E9C57EEE119B.JPG
  7. CorriganJ

    CorriganJ n00b

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    Thankyou. So you reckon I will still have fun on it on the road? I don't want to be dragging knees, I just want to keep up with traffic in the mountain roads... I've been riding 2 up on a 125cc Hyosung GT so anything will be better than that...

    Are they vibey at motorway speeds? Might do one or two longer trips and don't love numb hands.

    I've seen a lot of people reccomend front end swaps and refering to a forum that no longer exists? Does anyone know which front end swaps are best for on road touring?
  8. GuidoHL

    GuidoHL Adventurer

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    Well, mine is a little vibey at 4500-5000 rpm. Not in handlebars but you can feel the transition from super smooth to fine vibration as revs rise. Those revs equate to about 100-120kph so motorway speeds. Mine has 30K miles (UK import) on the speedo but may have done more of course. The vibration isn't unpleasant just noticeable. Test ride one or two to see for yourself if you can.
    As mentioned I've put a 2004 CRF450R front end on mine to get upside down forks. Standard springs. If you time your off throttle and braking badly it still pitches like the original forks but I think always will with long travel. But I only changed the front for fun and because I could do it myself - had to machine another stem but used CRF triples still. Then fitted DR650 master cylinder as the S10 one is set up for two discs and doesn't move the right amount of oil for a single (CRF again) caliper. I used to look at the original forks down through the fairing as I rode and see it shaking. Standard brakes are also average.
    "Dan UK" mentions vibration in his and was going to swap some clutch bits - not sure where he ended up. He shows his S10 on pg79 so clutch comments somewhere after that?
    The only way these will hold up traffic is if you don't turn the throttle - they aren't fast by modern standards but still get along fine with good road manners.
    Try to get a ride on one - that's the only way you'll know if it's you.
  9. CorriganJ

    CorriganJ n00b

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    Thankyou. In that case, if anyone in Madrid region is happy to show me their bike I would be eternally grateful...
    EXTEEZED likes this.
  10. EXTEEZED

    EXTEEZED Adventurer

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    If you are looking at an XTZ750 then no other bike will have the same impact for you, they are so much fun to ride and own. A big beautiful slab of metal. As above, you must try one out though.
    The three jobs you have to do on any older XTZ you buy, especially if you want to ride two up, are the front forks, the rear shock and the seat. Front forks, unless you are lucky will always need servicing, standard rear shock if original won’t be great for two up and must be changed and the seat is awful for two up as it is angled, narrow and slippery. A grippy seat cover makes it better and there are aftermarket seats.
  11. 3TD00900

    3TD00900 Been here awhile

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    Hi folks, I’m looking for a 525 SuperSprox sproket 46t in gold/black. Fiks on the xtz750 super tenere.
  12. Maxi

    Maxi I'm famous

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    Hello fellow riders got 2 questions maybe some of you got same problem an fixed .
    1.My exhaust pipe is almost welded to my cylinder head over the years so now I can't get it out , I want to service the water pump so now I'm stuck. I only have the bike fron 2020 March so I just did some cleaning and oil change ...I don't think the exhaust was remove at least for 8,9 years . IMG_20210207_163650.jpg IMG_20210207_163658.jpg IMG_20210207_164035.jpg
    And 2. Anybody have moved the voltage regulator or put a fan on it ? Mine it's starting to overheat and I ali have a plate for coling any tips ?! .
    Thx guys
  13. Bowler

    Bowler Been here awhile

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    The later XTZ's (like mine) have a different voltage regulator (more surface area) and it's relocated to below the saddle. You could try to buy a bracket for a later bike and change it.
  14. orestis

    orestis Time flies when riding

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    This regulator is very weak. I''ve changed a bunch of them back in the day. Change it for the better one from YAMAHA or any aftermarket that fits - must still be plenty of choices.
  15. 3TD00900

    3TD00900 Been here awhile

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  16. Bowler

    Bowler Been here awhile

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  17. 3TD00900

    3TD00900 Been here awhile

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    On the picture you can see txz 750.
    cockpit