The Yamaha TW200 Thread...

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by neepuk, Jan 10, 2009.

  1. ChopperCharles

    ChopperCharles Long timer

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    I had the same problem with my 87. No amount of jetting would fix it. If I held throttle wfo on the highway, it would almost hit a wall. Almost like an ignition cutout for half a sec, then it’d go back to attempting to accelerate, until it did it again. If I backed off a little I could nurse it a little faster, but it never really worked like it should. This is with the older non CV carb. I know the dub doesn’t have an ignition cutoff and I also know what valve float feels like and it wasn’t that either. Seemed to only happen in top gear with the load of having to cut through the wind. In lower gears not a problem.

    It’s good to know if I get another tee dub there is a fix for it. :)

    Charles.
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  2. ChopperCharles

    ChopperCharles Long timer

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    If the previous owner was a big guy, he may have installed heavy duty clutch springs. Heavy duty springs have a shorter engagement zone. That said, my T dub Had a terrible clutch feel until I replaced the cable. Brand new cable and proper cable routing makes a huge difference.

    Charles.
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  3. RCEMT-P

    RCEMT-P Been here awhile

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    I struggled with mine for awhile till I got used to it. I've honestly found I probably look like a noob when I try and RIP it away from a stop sign cause it shifts so weird. It likes a nice smooth and easy shift I've found. This bikes far from performance.
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  4. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Ok, so far, today, I changed the oil using Mobil 1 10W40, installed a new clutch lever (original was slightly tweaked and bent), double checked the return spring (it was fine), and tightened the adjustment as per WYO George's advise...

    I just took a little spin through town (14 miles) and I'm happy to report that for whatever reason, the clutch felt better. :thumb I can't say that it's awesome, but it's better, and I suppose I'd call it livable.

    I'm not sure which change made it better, but whatever the case, I can live with it now.

    New front tire, 47 tooth rear sprocket, and X-ring chain to install tomorrow...

    Will report back on impressions of new gearing, but so far, tonight told me that this little things is FUN, and will be a keeper! :ricky

    On a side note, the new lever I installed was by Tusk. IMO, it is superior to the original as the pivot has a bronze bushing. Not sure how much real world difference it makes, but I can say that it had less "slop". And, it was only $7.54 shipped. :thumbup
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  5. wildknits

    wildknits Adventurer Supporter

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    I have been to Aerostich many times, used to live just one mile from their shop, and have a customized Darien jacket (I am fairly small-statured) and Darien Light pants (bought on sale at their suggestion when I was ready to purchase a full price pair). They are great folks and give a discount if you walk in. I agree, the gear is worth the price.
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  6. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    It may get even better the next oil change.
    Two other things you might put on the list are a seat concepts seat kit and the pro cycle fork upgrade kit.
    I found both to be very good.

    I am not slow on the TW. Its no KTM but it can keep up with normal dual sports...

    I have over 2500 miles on it and have not fallen yet, came close once or twice but saved it due to the low center of gravity.
    Everyone I have ridden with has dropped their bikes.....
    No fear of the worst trails on the TW!


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  7. Nobade

    Nobade Keep on keepin' on...

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    Brett,
    Did you go with the springs and gold valves or just the springs? I have been thinking about adding the springs to my next order from them but wondering how much of an improvement they give by themselves or if doing the gold valve kit in addition would be worth it?
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  8. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    I did both, the slightly stiffer springs and the emulators.
    Now I feel the back suspension harshness, the forks work well.
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  9. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Thanks for the replies. The clutch seems a little better but still not what I'm used to... The clutch just engages much later than what I'd consider "normal" for most bikes. I'm just riding it as is, and trying to get used to it. Worse case, the clutch is shot... If that's the case, eventually it'll start slipping. I'll replace when and if necessary.

    In the meantime, had a chance to get a few things done on the bike...

    [​IMG]



    I installed a 47 tooth rear sprocket and X-ring chain today...


    [​IMG]


    Also a Shinko 241 with Michelin ULTRA heavy duty tube. And when they say ultra, they mean it! This thing is almost as thick as the tire! Hopefully it'll prove puncture and pinch resistant.


    [​IMG]


    I'm guessing that it's the heavy tube, or maybe the tire... or probably a combination of the two, but a shortish test ride revealed a little wheel hop. Not horrible, but slightly perceptible. I normally balance my bike tires, but with the low speeds of this bike I didn't bother. Looks like I'll be pulling it off again once I get some decent clip on spoke type wheel weights. Don't want to waste my good lead stick-ons that I use on bikes with cast wheels.

    Also got the worst of the gouges sanded out of the hand guards, and installed them a couple nights ago... Not pretty, but serviceable.


    [​IMG]


    Also have a DG exhaust inbound. I know it serves no real purpose. But I like the looks, and the back to back sound comparo that TDubskid did, sure sounded better than the wheezy stock exhaust. Once I get it installed it'll be time to dive into the carb and see what's what...

    Overall it's a cool little bike. Really enjoying the low seat height and weight. Makes for a very confidence inspiring little runabout. :)
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  10. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    I would never use those heavy duty tubes, the TW has a rear tire on the front and with the original tube and low pressure I hit roots and so on at speed with no issue.
    Adding a heavy tire along with a heavy tube to that heavy rim is really going to impact things in a negative way.

    I am looking for a lighter tube type tire to run in the front.
    A heavy front wheel will slow acceleration and braking, and be harder to control over bumps, plus I like to lift the front over things
    with the throttle and a tug on the bars. With all that weight its going to be impossible to do that.
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  11. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    I definitely get the advantages of less unsprung weight. But, back in the day when I did a lot of more serious off-road riding, being 10 trail miles from the truck with a flat sucked! I switched to heavy duty natural rubber tubes and never had an issue again. Most standard tubes are synthetic rubber which has a tendency to rip when damaged. This ripping effect causes sudden loss of pressure, and often is unrepairable with a patch kit. Natural rubber doesn't have this tendency and typically looses pressure in a much more controlled fashion, and is often more easily repairable with a patch. YMMV. I got in the habit of running higher quality tubes for this reason. IMO, when riding a bike with inner tubes,the difference between having a nice day and a miserable one can sometimes be determined by the quality of tube I run. Been there and done that, more than once...

    The rear wheel/tire on the TW is heavy as hell. Much of that weight is from the steel wheel Yamaha uses as well as that huge ass fat rear tire. The front, with aluminum rim was lighter than I expected. The stock tube I pulled out didn't impress me at all. While a few ounces lighter, it was MUCH thinner than the one that replaced it. When I first saw the Michelin, I thought, "Damn, that's overkill." It was thicker than expected for certain. So, I thought that I may just reuse the original. Then, when I saw the original, I was glad that I'd ordered the Michelin. :thumb So, while the Michelin tube that I ordered was thicker than expected, I feel much more confident with it than I would have been if I'd kept the stocker. At the speeds I'll likely be riding the TW (slowly), I'm less concerned with the affects of a little more unsprung weight that the heavy duty tube brings to the table, than the added insurance against flats that it'll provide.

    In any event, we all ride whatever makes us most comfortable in our individual applications. :beer
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  12. JagLite

    JagLite Long timer Supporter

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    I use Ride-On tire sealant/balancer in my bikes.
    I first used it on my street bike (Drifter 1500) on a 3,300 mile rid home to Alaska for the potential safety in case of a puncture.
    Even if it didn't seal the tube I hoped it would slow the leak enough for me to get off the highway.
    A front tire blow out at 65 would be too exciting for me.

    I read a lot online about various tire sealants and decided that Ride-On is the only brand I would use.
    The fact that it also balances the wheel was of little concern because I balance my wheels.
    Except that I could not balance the very heavy steel wheels and tires after replacing the tires and tubes where I was working on the bike.
    I decided to stop along the way at a shop to get them balanced if it was a problem.
    No balancing needed, the wheels were perfect up to the fastest speed I cruised at, 85 mph.
    I am very impressed!

    After using it on that ride I bought Ride-on for my other bikes and experimented with the balancing by leaving the old weights on, installing a new tube and tire, putting Ride-On in the tube and riding it for a few miles. It would roll smooth and be great, then I removed the balance weights and went out for another ride to have the same excellent results.

    I don't understand how it works, I just know it does.
    I don't know if it has sealed any punctures, it is just insurance.
  13. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Hmmm... I don't use sealants on non-tube type tires due to the mess it creates. But, now that you mention it, and if it also provides a balancing effect, maybe I should give it a go... Research is needed... :thumb
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  14. YZEtc

    YZEtc Feel lucky?

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    I used the traditional stick-on lead balancing weights when I replaced the front tire of my TW.
    Worked like a charm and haven't shown the slightest tendency to get rubbed off.
    Even on the mighty TW and my habit of 40mph on the street, I balanced the wheel before reinstalling it.
    Glad I did because it's smooth.
    I used an IRC TR1 trials tire.
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  15. frog13

    frog13 Long timer

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    Great info on tubes Randy.....thank you. The front bounce you mention could be a balance issue....you already know that. Air pressure perhaps? ??..... just a guess...... : )
  16. turbodieseli4i6

    turbodieseli4i6 Been here awhile

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    I have been running Ride-On tire sealant balancer for almost 70,000 miles on my NC700X. I love it! It does great for balancing my tires, and knock on wood, I've never had a flat while using it. With that said, I'm always looking for a better deal. I found another company that advertises the same results with the ability to stop a 1/2'' hole at a lower cost.
    Sahara High-speed Tire Sealant. I have it in my Honda tires now. It is a major pain to install through the valve stem, because it will seal it very fast. The ride feels good so far. Here's a link for it.
    https://smile.amazon.com/Sahara-High-Speed-Tire-Sealant/dp/B07G4BFQ3W/ref=smi_www_rco2_go_smi_g3905707922? _encoding=UTF8&%2AVersion%2A=1&%2Aentries%2A=0&ie=UTF8
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  17. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Was running 18 lbs front and rear. It wasn't terrible. At first I thought it was simply imperfections in the road that I was feeling. Then, as I rode on a few different roads, and at various speeds, I determined that it was balance. I normally balance my tires, but for whatever reason, this time I didn't. :dunno I ordered a bottle of Ride On, but honestly I'm a little skeptical... Once that stuff is in the tube, it's in there for good. And if it doesn't work, well... I may just pull it off and balance it the old fashioned way tonight...
  18. Cyclepath

    Cyclepath Lost wanderer

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    I have been using Ride-On in all 8 of my street bikes and dirt bikes. Since I started using it years ago I have not ever balanced a tire again. For me it works. I use a little more then they recomend .
    I run 17 lbs tire pressure for the street and 13 for dirt riding. At what speeds are you noticing this problem ? I doubt that you are having a balance problem.
    What kind of tires are you using ?
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  19. Cyclepath

    Cyclepath Lost wanderer

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    Hey Jag.... I use ride on in all my bikes. On a trip a couple years ago with my 1500 Goldwing I stopped for lunch and ran over a bolt about 1/8 inch in diameter and didn't realize it until I came out from lunch. Luckily when I looked the bike over before leaving that bolt was at the back of the tire where I could see it. There was a llittle orange around the bolt from the ride on. The tire was still inflated. I hesitated to pull that bolt out but I put the bike up on the center stand and got the bolt as close to the ground as I could and pulled it out. I thought what the hell, worst thing is I would have to plug it. After pulling the bolt out the tire squirted out ride on for maybe 2 or 3 seconds and sealed the hole. I used the wings on board air pump to re-inflate the tire and went on my way. It held air for the 250 mile trip back home, when I was in my shop I plugged the tire and never had a problem after that.
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  20. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Shinko 241 with a Michelin Ultra Heavy Duty Tube. I noticed it at speeds between 30 and 60 with the harmonics being more prevalent around 30-45ish. Having mounted and balanced my own tires for quite a number of years, I've sometimes skipped it. In some cases, I never noticed. In a few others, I did. Some actually need little to no weight. Others take some, with some taking a good bit. A lot of quality street tires need little as they are made for the purpose of higher speeds and the manufacturers maintain good construction and uniformity. Some have balancing dots on the sidewall to line up with the valve stem to aid in balancing. This being a cheap tire designed for trials riding (read slow), I doubt the manufacturer places a high emphasis on weight uniformity in the carcass. Plus, I'm using a heavy tube. I'm fairly sure the front tire needs to be balanced. It isn't horrific, just annoying. Either that, or the tire is out of round enough to cause it. (doubtful) In any event, I plan to pull it off tonight and throw it on my Parnes balancer, so I'll see how it does. Be a good time to check lateral and vertical run-out too.
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