The Yamaha TW200 Thread...

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by neepuk, Jan 10, 2009.

  1. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Yes, it is! And at least 5-6 hours of that time was spent hooning along dirt roads at a good clip, some of which were just semi-maintained, and most of which were rough as hell. So, there was a bit of sitting, and a lot of transitions from seated to standing. Once again, I was reminded that the TW's suspension really isn't intended for hard use... Then again, the limitations of the suspension, and the power, is the one thing that keeps my inner hooligan in check, so it's not necessarily a bad thing in the end. And, the other attributes of the bike, like low seat height and fat ass tires... Well, let's just say that it was a very good way in which to beat the hell out of myself for the better part of a day... :D REALLY looking forward to doing it again! :ricky
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  2. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    That is really what the TW does best.
    With suspension upgrades and a good rider, you can move at a good clip over all but the roughest terrain, safely for the most part.
    It lets you explore and have fun without most of the risk of getting hurt, and getting hurt might mean no riding for a while or longer.
    And if you want to go at a mellow pace and look around, no bike will do better.
    I had a lot of fun zipping down smoother sandy trails and dirt roads riding the TW like a street bike through the turns with all its traction, but it also
    does great just poking along through the nastiest stuff.


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  3. garandman

    garandman Wandering Minstrel

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    The time has come, sadly, to sell our TW200. It’s a 2009, think it has around 2,800 miles on it. What’s the going price? I’m thinking it’s worth $2,700-2,800.
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  4. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Sounds about right depending on condition, accessories, etc. I paid $2500 for my 2009 last October with 3000 some odd miles. Close to 4000 i think. Decent condition with Pro Taper ATV bars, big pegs, rear rack, and Acerbis hand guards and a few other little things. But, I didn't hesitate at that price since I'd been looking for one off and on for a while.
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  5. Bucho

    Bucho DAMNrider

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    Its really not. I'd say go ahead and jump right in.
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  6. JagLite

    JagLite Long timer Supporter

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    Have you watched any videos of the many riders on the TAT?
    The only challenging parts are the mountains out west and even there people are riding all kinds of odd bikes over the trails.
    Grom's, CT110's, GS1200's, street bikes, side car bikes, and Harley's.
    The TW is an excellent ride for all the more challenging trails and only falls short on the long, long, boring straight dirt roads through the flat states.
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  7. DirtyOldMan

    DirtyOldMan Motorsickle enthusiast

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    Where abouts in the world are you? That looks like something I’d be interested in.
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  8. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Got a wild hair today and finally ordered a JNS LED headlight unit for the TW. I don't normally ride at night, but with these longer trips I've been doing recently after discovering all these new places to ride, it's inevitable that sooner or later I'll be late getting home... I'm not sure how much better the lighting will be than stock. Guess I'll see soon enough...

    But, actually, my main motivation was to reduce the current draw so that hopefully I'll be able to use my heated gear in colder weather. The low beam is stated to use 20W with the stock halogen bulb drawing 55W. So, that saves 35W when just running the low beam. The high beam adds another 15W on top, for a total of 35W when running high beam. But that still saves 25W from the stocker's 60W high beam.

    Then, supposedly the LED tail/brake light that I posted about recently draws only 3W compared to the stock bulb's 8W. I bought this bulb for the brighter brake light and strobe effect, but less current requirements is an added bonus for me.

    So, now, between the two lighting upgrades I've saved 40W from stock. In theory at least.

    That may not be enough to run my Warm N Safe jacket liner. At least not on full duty cycle with the Heattroller, but perhaps on halfway.

    I recently picked up an Aerostich heated bib from eBay for a decent price. It's said to draw 30W. And last time I used my original heated gear, an old Widder vest, it still worked well. I think I remember it drawing 35W. So, either of these should work just fine as on low beam, I'll still have a total current requirement of less than the bike had as stock.

    Now, depending on how the light output is, I may also consider some auxiliary LED lights to wire in on the high beam circuit. This setup should allow me to run heated gear of some sort during the majority of my riding time (daylight hours) and give me better deer spotting ability when I do get caught out after dark. Probably don't need to run the heated gear while running high beam, but being out late and in the cold isn't that common of a combination for me.

    I'll see about getting some before and after photos so others can see the differences in light output, if any.
  9. Aguaski

    Aguaski Been here awhile

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    Randy - There is even more power savings available by going LED with your indicator signals and replacing all the little incandescent bulbs hidden in the instrument cluster. I upgraded my speedometer, high beam indicator, turn signal indicator and neutral indicator to LED. It’s all easy to get to and replace. You just need to order the proper LED bulbs. Tdubs Kid has a video about this.
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  10. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    I've considered that. Then again, the turn signals don't run all that much so don't really represent much of a drain on the charging system overall. And then there's the hassle of getting LED turn signals to work properly. I've converted a couple of bikes in the past but not sure that I want to bother here. Of course, the front running lights do run all the time so that would be a savings worth considering I suppose. Do you know if leaving the rear turn signals incandescent would allow front LED replacements to work normally? This works with some bikes but not with some others. Guess I need to look into the wiring a bit...

    And my high beam indicator did go out a while ago. Not big deal but I've been meaning to replace it anyway, so I guess I should look into replacing with LEDs. I've seen Tdubs Kid's video but it's been a while. Maybe I should watch it again to refresh my memory....
  11. Bucho

    Bucho DAMNrider

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    That sounds more or less fair. Wish I had the extra $ for it. I'd like a TW as an "extra" dirt/dualsport bike. If you want a KLX140L in partial trade maybe we can work something out.
  12. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    JNS LED headlight unit was delivered today. Ordered on Wednesday afternoon, and delivered on Friday afternoon. How's that for quick shipping?! :thumb

    Planning to do some maintenance on the TW tonight anyway, so I'll also install the new headlight. I'll try to get some photos after dark to see how the light output compares to stock.


    In the meantime, here's the light straight out of the box...


    IMG_0381.JPG
  13. Mi0

    Mi0 :[

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    Aw Randy, should have waited for the new one to be released soon. I don't have the JNS but folks have been saying it's not that bright. New one should be brighter (and DOT approved too).
  14. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Yeah, I read about that some time ago. Inquired about it but never got a reply. My only reason for really wanting it was to save some juice for electrically heated gear as I don't really ride at night on purpose anyway. Of course that seems silly this time of year... :loco Lol But, also, I have been taking this thing a good ways from home and on two occasions recently, I was concerned about not getting home before dark... DEER CITY around here! So, basically got tired of waiting for something better to come out... Of course, that means that the new one will come out next week, be twice as bright, and draw half as much current... :lol3 All of you that have been patiently awaiting the new version can thank me for pushing it along... :wink:
  15. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Ok, got the valves adjusted, the oil changed, and the JNS headlight installed tonight. As @Mi0 mentioned, it's not overwhelmingly bright but not too bad. If someone's sole purpose for buying it is for lighting improvements, I couldn't in all honesty say that it's worth the money, IMO. But, as I said earlier, my primary impetus was to get a drop in current draw to allow me to run heated gear in cooler weather, while still providing decent lighting. Sort of strange to think of that this time of year, but it's been on my mind since buying the bike and I was in a spending mood... :D And for that, I think it will do the trick. And if I want even better lighting, the current drop would allow me to add pod lights similar to Tdubs Kid, wired to the high beam switch, to give really good lighting. But, as mentioned, I don't really ride after dark if I can help it so...

    A secondary reason was for conspicuity. And I do believe that this light will be more noticeable to other drivers than the stock halogen. Something about LED lighting just seems to catch the eye, IMO. :dunno

    Anyway, here's some comparison photos. I took some before shots last night in anticipation of the swap. Then, tonight I took some more with the JNS headlight installed. All photos were taken with my iPhone with no attempt to adjust anything in the camera settings... Just snapped some photos... Take them for what they're worth...

    Stock low beam:

    IMG_0379.JPG


    JNS low beam:

    IMG_0384.JPG

    Stock high beam:

    IMG_0378.JPG

    JNS high beam:

    IMG_0385.JPG
  16. Mike Dirt

    Mike Dirt Been here awhile

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    Problem with wiring heated grips to the headlight is switching between high and low beam will turn the heated grips off.
  17. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    I wasn't planning to wire anything directly to the headlight circuit. I just wanted to lower the wattage requirements of the headlight so that the charging system can provide enough current to run a heated vest without discharging the battery.

    BUT, if you want to wire something into the headlight circuit on a bike that cuts the low beam when the high beam is activated, and keep it on regardless of which beam is on, wire it to the headlight circuit before the high/low beam switch. But, honestly, for a high load item like heated grips, I'd advise wiring a keyed circuit as a trigger circuit to a relay, and have a dedicated power supply, fed by the relay, for the accessory.
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  18. Fr8dog61

    Fr8dog61 Been here awhile

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    If I may butt in...
    Need a dedicated circuit and relay, like Randy sez, as well as the lower power requirements of the LED’s. TDubs ain’t got much generator output! Looks like the LED light output is a big improvement, too! Bonus!

    :thumb
  19. JB44

    JB44 Been here awhile

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    Randy,
    From your photos, the JNS headlight is certainly better at lighting up the sides of the roadway.
    I believe that was one of your goals.

    Although, I notice the stock headlight has a cutout for oncoming drivers, which I don't see on the JNS. Wondering if the JNS would blind those oncomining in the dark?

    Wouldn't make a difference during daylight.

    jb
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  20. WECSOG

    WECSOG Dirt Road Denizen

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    For those who rock an '87, an LED headlight won't work for you because the '87 powers its headlight on AC from a dedicated stator winding.
    It would be simple to add a bridge rectifier to the circuit; then it will work. Just a heads up.
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