The Yamaha TW200 Thread...

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by neepuk, Jan 10, 2009.

  1. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    IDK. Oxford heated grips draw 30 watts each for a total of 60w. While that may not be "a lot", it's enough for me to not want to add to an existing switched circuit for fear of prematurely damaging the switch. Of course, I may be overthinking it... :dunno

    I'm thinking back to the day before LED was common, and I added aux lights to augment the high beam on my GS. I still had the original halogen high beam bulb, and wired the aux lights to be triggered by the high beam. Didn't want the extra load going through the high beam switch so used a relay triggered by the high beam circuit. My comment above was in regard to a post that sounded like perhaps the poster was wiring something to the headlight wiring after the switch. With an LED headlight, this may be fine, but with the stock halogen bulb I wouldn't add that much load to the headlight switch, personally.

    On the other hand, I'm currently planning to add aux lights to my Himalayan. On that bike, I already have an LED headlight unit, and two LED aux lights. The total current demand of all lights together will be less than just the stock low beam alone... I'm still in flux on exactly what wiring scheme I want to use on that bike...
  2. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Life is for good friends and great adventures Supporter

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    I think you'll find the heated grips draw about 20W max. Based on current draw, the ones on my DR350 draw 8W on min and 18W on max. If Oxford run to 30W (total) that would explain why I could never use the max setting when I had them on my R1100GS - they would burn my hands and you could smell the hot rubber.
  3. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    :dunno I have no idea. I've never owned a set, or tested them in any way. Just going off of what I read that Oxford lists for their grips.

    "The technical data included in the instructions states that typical running voltage is between 13.5 and 14.3 volts.
    Each grip requires 2.1 amps or 28 to 30 Watts, so practically speaking the total draw should be around 60 Watts."

    https://www.webbikeworld.com/oxford-hotgrips-review-aka-oxford-heaterz/

    I've never used heated grips except for the stock ones on my R1150GS and never really cared for them all that much really. I find that my W-n-S heated gloves do a MUCH better job at keeping my hands warm as the heat is mainly on the backs where it's needed most. I have their jacket liner and their dual control remote Heattroller too, so it all transfers to any bike with a power outlet as easy as just jumping on and plugging in.
  4. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Life is for good friends and great adventures Supporter

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    I think WBW made a mistake - the current is 2.1A total, not per grip - otherwise, Oxford would not run them through a 5A fuse as normal current would be far too close to blowing the fuse.

    When I was preparing my DR350 for the TAT, I installed a 25/25W headlamp (interestingly, you could not really tell the difference between this and the stock 55/60W), LED tail-lamp and LED instrument lamps. I then measured the current draw of all these, plus the two dual-output USB chargers with GPS's in use, heated jacket, heated grips and an aux LED light to ensure the charging system could keep up. The Firstgear jacket only pulled 80W on max (a setting which is almost too hot to be usable under normal cold conditions.) As noted earlier, the grips I installed (not Oxford hot-grips) were consuming ~18W on max. As it happened, I ended up only using them a couple of times but maximum was plenty, even in 32F rain, and compared reasonably well to the hot grips I had used previously on another bike.

    The charging system of the TW is similar to that of the DR, although there were significant changes for both over the years (and the DR had kickstart-only options with very weak charging systems.) Post-2000 TW charging systems should be capable of producing over 150W at 3500rpm and 200W at higher rpm. Assuming you have a post-2000 TW and will not be idling or stop/start riding, 150W should be enough to run LED lights, grips and jacket/vest, while still keeping the battery charged. If you are riding in conditions so cold you might need everything on Max or you'll need more heated gear such as pants or boot liners, you'd best have a very well maintained charging system and be keeping the rpm well up all the time.
  5. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Not to beleaguer the point, but Twisted Throttle lists them as, "Current drain: Average 3.6 amps per pair (up to 2.0 amps each - 28-30 watts)", and even Oxford's website says "Draws under 4A". :dunnoBut, I guess my original point on the grips wasn't so much about current draw as it pertains to bike output, as much as it was to what circuit they were tied into... I was just making the point that I wouldn't want to add another 60w, or even 30w, to a high load circuit like a halogen headlight without a relay.

    Regardless of the grips, thanks for the additional input. I'm reducing the demands on the charging system now and hope to do some testing in the future just to see what I can get away with comfortably in terms of my heated gear. My WnS jacket liner draws 65w with the Heattroller all the way up. Can't remember on my Gerbing. And then I have an old Widder vest that draws 35w, and an Aerostich bib that I think is 30w.

    My hands give me FITS in cold weather. But since my WnS gloves are pricey, and not really meant for off-road use, I won't be using them on the TW. I learned many years ago, when I first discovered heated gear, that if I can keep my core temp up, my hands don't get near as bad. Plus, on the TW, the average speeds won't be like they are on a street ride, or as long of a duration either. Hmmm... But, if the heated grips really aren't that large of a current requirement, maybe I'll look into them... They would probably do better at TW speeds than my experience with them at high, long duration speeds... Maybe one of my low wattage vests/bib combined with a set of low wattage grip heaters could work out. Will need to do a bit of testing to see, I suppose....
  6. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Life is for good friends and great adventures Supporter

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    I have had excellent results on several bikes with cheap (Chinese?) heated grips. All the ones I have purchased so far have had a soft rubber feel, whereas some of the better known brands (not Oxford) are still selling hard, slippery, heated grips. The cheapest I have tried were only about $10, shipped. $25 or so will get you a nicer finish and a well-made LED-illuminated multi-stage controller.

    I agree that heated gloves are superior in terms of keeping hands warm. However they are harder to use, limit you to whatever other properties they may have (waterproofing, impact protection, etc.) and can't be adjusted/added/removed on-the-fly whereas you can turn grips on and off, higher/lower, as needed during a ride. Finally, the grips are always on the bike and you don't need to remember to pack them.
  7. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Each have their pros and cons, I suppose. My Warm n Safe heated grips are the waterproof version. I also use them with my Warm n Safe heated jacket liner, with both controlled by a two channel remote Heattroller. The transmitter/controller is a battery powered standalone device that you can attach anywhere you like so that it's easy to reach and adjust on the fly. The two channel version I have has two control knobs, one for the jacket, and one for the gloves, so you can independently change the temp of each at will. I like the setup for several reasons. For one, for me at least, the gloves work well to keep my hands warm regardless of the ambient temperature. And for another, with just a power pigtail, I can equip all of my bikes to use this same setup. All I have to do is take the remote controller from one handlebar and attach it to another (self-contained, no wires), jump on and plug in one power lead to the bike's pigtail. The only disadvantage to me is that you do have to plug each glove into the mating plug in each cuff of the jacket liner. Not a huge ordeal, and one I'm happy to deal with for warm hands. :-)

    I don't just get cold hands... I get like really painful hands! Comparing notes with my friends, I assume that my condition isn't "normal". I guess I should get checked as I think there's a syndrome or something that causes my symptoms. But, I've just learned how to deal with it. And with today's modern advancements in riding gear, I guess I'm fortunate that I have the ability to prevent it from affecting my riding enjoyment. :thumb
  8. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Life is for good friends and great adventures Supporter

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    I can just deal with cold hands and I'm generally still in mesh gear when others are already contemplating heated stuff - but I do use heated gear extensively in the winter. I have a dual channel controller like yours and also swap it back and forth between bikes. Having hard-wired permanent heated grips is still incredibly useful to me and I don't have to remember to bring gloves in case it cools down or stop to put them on if I run into some unexpected cold rain or....
  9. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Makes sense. Options are always a good thing. :thumb

    I'm a wuss when it comes to cold. I'll be wearing, or at least packing, my heated gear before most others, more than likely. But, for whatever reason, I can't handle cold hands. Legs and feet never bother me. But, OH my hands! I think it's called Raynaud's disease, although I've never seen a doctor or been formally diagnosed. But whatever you term it, it causes deep pain in my hands, that if left unchecked limits my ability to feel or use my fingers with any amount of control. So, not only is it very unpleasant, it can pose a safety concern if left to proceed too long. The gloves are the best solution I've found. But since they aren't really made for the type of thing I use the TW for, I may look into a set of heated grips. On that bike, with the lower speeds and type of riding I use it for mainly, the heated grips would probably do the trick. I don't even ride that much when it's that cold out these days anyway. But, like I said, options are always a good thing...
  10. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Life is for good friends and great adventures Supporter

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    Rhino muffs are damn ugly but REALLY effective.
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  11. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Hmmm... That is something I've considered long ago. Had forgotten about them until now. That may be an option I should consider as well. Ugly? Who cares? It's a TW. :lol3
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  12. frog13

    frog13 Long timer

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    Function over form.......any day. Ride on.
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  13. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    This is NOT TW related. But, since I posted the GPX track file for the Alabama Skyway here a few days back, I thought someone may be interested in a bit more info on it. This past Sunday I did a portion of the southern section of that track on my Himalayan so thought I'd post a link to a short ride report post I made about it over on the Himalayan thread. I also mentioned my TW in that post as well, if it helps...:D

    One of Cliff's notes is that it was MUCH more challenging than the section of the SEAT (Roanoke to Heflin) that I did the weekend before on the TW. In hindsight, I had the two bikes and two rides flip flopped...

    I had to split my report into two posts, so I'll provide links to both here. Although, the second part is just down below the first if you just scroll down a couple of posts from HERE:
    https://advrider.com/f/threads/royal-enfield-himalayan-owners-thread.1253460/page-820#post-40161564

    And the main part, just below the first is HERE:
    https://advrider.com/f/threads/royal-enfield-himalayan-owners-thread.1253460/page-820#post-40161973

    I DO plan to reride this route and finish it on the TW soon if anyone is in the area and would like to join....

    And I will add that while the route was a bit much for me on the Himalayan, it would be an awesome ride on the TW! Challenging to a degree perhaps, but in a way that would make the TW shine.

    :ricky
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  14. WECSOG

    WECSOG Dirt Road Denizen

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    Good ride! I rode over Cheaha on my Sportster in about 2003. The trail down the south side was pretty rough, but by the time I discovered that I was committed.
  15. ryder1

    ryder1 Long timer

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    Sorry for the side track but @Randy Can younprovide a link for W-n-S heated gloves ? My hands and feet tur . Into icecubes when it gets cold out.

    Hippo hands are another brand of attachable winter protection. Someone on the sewing thread mentioned using a yoga mat as a tankbag material for firmness. I think it will work well for homemade hippohands.
  16. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    The gloves I use:

    https://www.warmnsafe.com/products/ultimate-touring-mens-heated-gloves

    They have others here:

    https://www.warmnsafe.com/collections/heated-gloves-socks


    I also use their jacket liner. The one I use:

    https://www.warmnsafe.com/collectio...s/generation-waterproof-65w-mens-heated-liner

    Or at least that's the one I think I have. They have the same thing in a 90w version though and I can't remember now which I have. Either way, I have the waterproof version and I selected the dual remote control option. This puts the receiver and control unit in a special pocket into the the jacket and a separate battery powered remote that you can put where ever you want, like a pocket, or someplace on the bike for easy access.

    The controller is like this:

    https://www.warmnsafe.com/products/dual-remote-control-heat-troller

    When used with the jacket liner and gloves (the gloves plug into mating plugs in the cuffs of the sleeves), one knob controls the jacket and the other controls the gloves, which gives great control of comfort.

    They of course have other options but this setup works for me because with multiple bikes, all I need is to add the power pigtail to each. Then, it's just a matter of putting on the jacket and gloves, placing the controller on whichever bike I want, plug in the battery power lead to the jacket, and away I go... :ricky

    Of course, there are lots of options in heated gear, but if I were to somehow lose what I have now, I'd replace it with the exact same setup. :thumb

    Not cheap, but the best never is. And since comfort equates pleasure, and I ride for the joy it brings... Well, you get my drift... If I'm not enjoying myself I'd just as soon stay home on the sofa...

    And yeah, I do need to look into hippo hands again before winter. I thought about them years ago, but with the W-n-S gear I just never needed them. I sort of doubt the little TW will pull the gloves and jacket though, so Hippo hands may be prove worth having now. :thumb
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  17. nihil

    nihil Adventurer

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    This one lived.

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  18. YukoRider

    YukoRider Adventurer

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    I've been away for a few months. Got a long and remote ride coming up with the TW. What kind of mileage/kilometerage are people getting per standard tank?
  19. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    I had an encounter with a snake recently while on my TW. Was out on one of the local country back roads when I went passed him. Thought it looked like a copperhead so turned around and went back for a look. Sure enough, it was. In general, I don't mind snakes and like you, will normally go out of may way to not hurt them, although any copperhead that I find on my property around the house is a gonner... I've came VERY close to being bitten by them on a couple of occasions over the years. Also came home one night and found one in my garage. Makes me nervous to even go in the garage in my bare feet now. So I don't want them near where I am regularly, any more than possible. When I confirmed that this one was also a copperhead, my first impulse was to kill it. Sad I guess, but true nonetheless. But then I considered the fact that this time I was in HIS home, not mine, so reconsidered. But he just stayed there in the road. So, I decided to easy up closer to see if I could prompt him to go on about his business off the road. As I eased the bike up closer, the little bastard bit the front tire! Even though he was in front of the front tire, and I was on the bike, it still startled me enough to make me jump! :lol3 After he bit the tire he decided it was time to move on along and crawled away into the brush... Hopefully I earned a small amount of good Karma that day...
  20. nihil

    nihil Adventurer

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    I agree 100% with venomous snakes in close proximity to people being a bad thing. I'm rather fond of all sorts of critters (I've stopped for turtles and kittens too), but that's a recipe for disaster, and it's generally a lot safer to dispatch them than it is to try to capture and relocate them.

    When I was a kid my mother worked at this place that was very close to a small creek, and they had a steady influx of copperheads in the spring/summer months. She was terrified of snakes, and nobody else in the office was too keen to interact with them, so it kinda became my job to go clean house whenever they had visitors of the long and hiss-prone variety. It was a pretty common sight to see a 10-12yr old me riding my BMX up a 2 lane highway with a machete strapped to my back.
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