The Yamaha TW200 Thread...

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by neepuk, Jan 10, 2009.

  1. frog13

    frog13 Long timer

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    MPG......most of my riding is on road. If I'm on slow back roads (45 mph posted speeds).......I'm getting approximately 60 ish MPG........those speed limit stretches don't last to long though. Hope that helps.
    No idea off road, but, it's probably alot less.....IMO.
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  2. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    I've never actually checked my mileage too closely but in general I've found that mine is pretty dependent on RPM. Even riding pretty aggressively on gravel/dirt roads where the speeds are generally lower, I get quite a bit better mileage than I do droning down the road at higher RPM running 55 or over. And speaking of tank range, I have a Clarke tank so it holds a bit more than stock. I keep saying that I need to run it down to dry a few times just so I know what sort of range I can expect. But, with the variability that I've seen in my fuel mileage over different types of use, I'm not sure how accurate I could expect it to be on any given day...
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  3. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    I came around a turn on the street in the pine barrens and ran right over a rattllesnake in the road.
    I turned around and went back and it was gone.
    XT250, maybe not enough weight to kill it?

    1st one I had ever seen in all the years of riding out there.

    As far as mpg goes, 55 mpg if you are hot dogging it and having fun, gentle riding like 40 mph in 5th gear maybe 90 mpg.
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  4. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Oh, I'd say it killed it. Snakes can seem tough because a lot of fatal injuries can take a while to kill. But, they're really pretty fragile creatures. Two tires running over it broke multiple ribs,, and likely vertebrae as well as did organ damage. Not a guaranteed death, but I'd wager money that it didn't have a long productive life afterwards...
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  5. sibyrnes

    sibyrnes Adventurer Supporter

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    Most of the "Copperheads" that people think they see are actually Brown Water Snakes. I know I often made that mistake until I saw the Brown Water Snake in the Carnegie Museum.
    brown water snake.jpg

    Copperheads are very leery of people and are not seen that often. Bites are extremely rare. Same with Rattlesnakes.

    I practically grew up in the woods and have hiked and camped a lot in the West and have never seen a Rattlesnake or a Copperhead that I could positively identify.
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  6. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Life is for good friends and great adventures Supporter

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    Pretty sure about this one. ...Somewhere in Oklahoma, on the TAT.
    2016_09_04 10_54_27_P1020972.jpg
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  7. Cyclepath

    Cyclepath Lost wanderer

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    One didn't make it. He was dead when I came by. Kind of a small rattler. And the other one was a long side of hiking trail and I dang well know he was a rattler

    Attached Files:

  8. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    I can't speak to PA, or areas out west, but growing up in Louisiana, and living in Georgia for over 25 years, I can assure you that copperheads are very common in the southeastern US. We don't have too many rattlesnakes around where I live, but you don't have to go far to find them. I have two rattles lying on my counter right now that I got last year from rattlesnakes killed on my worksites. And, if you go just a bit south, into the southern part of Georgia, they are VERY common. And then, if you go up into north Georgia and western North Carolina, rattlesnakes are again very common. Predominately eastern diamond backs in south Georgia, and Timber rattlesnakes to the north, although that's just a general population density of the relative species and there's obviously crossover of each. Over 400 people are bitten by venomous snakes in Georgia every year, and copperhead bites are the most common. I've personally known three people that have been bitten by them myself, and I've had three very close calls with them. Two where I was cleaning brush and had my hands literally within inches of of their heads before spotting them. And another that I literally stepped on before spotting it. One of the reasons they aren't "seen that often" is due to their very effective camouflage. If they don't move it's almost impossible to spot them in the leaf litter of the forest floor. I don't "hunt" for them, but I'd guess that if I went out right now in my yard and tried, I could probably find at least one with a little time and effort. And yes, they are leery of people as are most species of snakes. But, like my story above about the one biting my tire, they will often stay still in hopes their camouflage will work. If that fails, and you get too close, they are not bashful about biting.

    As far as being able to identify them... Like I said, I grew up in areas full of them, so know very well how to differentiate them from other species. Same with water moccasins and rattlesnakes...

    As reference, here's a photo of the one I mentioned finding in my garage:

    In the garage when I spotted him...

    IMG_2507.JPG
    He was in a dark corner and my camera didn't like it.


    Out on the driveway after I got him out...


    IMG_2519.JPG


    This was not the first I've killed on my property and I'm sure it won't be the last.


    Other than the very distinctive markings and coloration, you can look at the head shape. Copperheads are pit vipers. All pit vipers have a "pit" between their nostrils and eyes called the pit organ. This sensory device allows them to basically see and hunt in the dark by allowing them to detect infrared radiation given off as heat of their prey. They all also have a distinctively triangular shape to their heads compared to the more rounded and slender head profile of non-venomous species. With the exception of the coral snake, all venomous snake species in the US are pit vipers.

    And before anyone dismisses the dangers due to the relatively low death rate of snake bite victims, while not often fatal with medical care, they do tremendous tissue damage in the areas surrounding the bite location. It's not at all uncommon for people to have progressive tissue death for weeks after the incident, often resulting in amputations of fingers, toes, hands and feet. Treat them with respect and steer clear...
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  9. FEG32

    FEG32 Too old and fat for any of this.....

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    Ok, It’s really not my nature to toot my own horn, but I’m really proud of this. First let me say that I am in no way mechanically inclined. One of the reasons I bought my t-dub was so that I could learn to work on my own bike, but I still took it to the shop for more complex repairs. A few weeks ago my electric start stopped working. It would spin, but it would never “catch” and turn the engine. After a bit of poking around and reading on several forums i narrowed it down to my starter clutch. So I figured I’d just use my kick start for a while until I could get it looked at and fixed at a local shop. Fast forward to the other day, I started getting a random rattle that sounded like it was coming from the lower end of my engine. I found a video on YouTube with a bike that sounded really close to what mine was doing and it turned out his starter clutch had sheared a couple of bolts and was knocking around in there. Repair shops are weeks out around here and this would have been a pricey repair so I decided to go after it. Found a flywheel assembly on eBay, bought a few tools and got to work.
    7790EE1E-6B13-4D6C-BCDE-6F2C2DE8626F.jpeg 634CCEA4-2AFF-4EDA-8256-D49F673C1809.jpeg

    I had a little trouble getting the crank bolt loose but finally got it with a big crescent wrench and an impact driver. Used a flywheel puller and got everything pulled out to get a look. My starter clutch was toast! Two of the bolts that connected it to the flywheel had broken off completely and the edge was gouged from knocking around in the case. AB6D9E60-DBF9-4421-A242-C51719DBC25D.jpeg 62B220DD-0DE4-4ED1-B304-B98B4A136339.jpeg

    luckily I bought the whole assembly so I didn’t have to worry about getting the broken bolts out of there. I just pulled everything out and had a look around to make sure there were no broken bits to fish out. I put everything back together with a new gasket and nervously fired it up. Success! My starter works again and all of my random rattles are gone. Thanks to everyone who posted how-to videos, I really learned a lot and it took a lot of the fear away. I spent about 200 hundred bucks on parts and tools but I figure the repair at a shop would have easily been double that, and I get to keep the tools.
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  10. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Good on you! :clap

    Not only did you save a lot in labor charges, but you now have tools for future maintenance and repair jobs so that initial savings will pay dividends for years to come. It's been my experience over the years that what people call being "mechanically inclined" is often more about confidence. Most things like this are within the grasp of the majority if they just have the confidence to do a little studying up and DIVE in. And this wasn't exactly a simple or easy repair... So, yeah, this experience should have you on your way to feeling more confident in the future with other things. And things do become a bit easier as your experience grows too, as you pick up little tips and tricks for how to go about things. The only down side, is that now you're on your way to collecting tools... :lol3 But, seriously, collecting tools happens over time as you do different jobs that need other things, or you learn what tool would work better than what you have. And the more tools you have, the more you can do, and the easier things become. But, with the savings in labor charges you can afford a LOT of tools pretty quickly if you want.
  11. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    Plus, now you know all about that part of the engine and how things work.
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  12. nihil

    nihil Adventurer

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    Can confirm. I grew up in NC/SC/GA and they were damn near infestation level in some areas. Only seen a small handful of rattlers out in the wild, but copperheads are as common as dirt in a lot of places, and not quite as shy as they're rumored to be.

    Yep, snakes are usually harmless enough if left alone, but they aren't very smart. They often aren't as camouflaged as they think they are when in/on/around man-made things, and will strike at tires, cars, and boots if you get too close. Here's a water moccasin who made its way out of the river to get some sun:
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  13. offroadtoys

    offroadtoys Been here awhile Supporter

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    Congrats on the fix! Nerve is all it takes sometimes to just get started and the rest is gravy. What year bike do you have? I hadn’t heard of this as a common problem.
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  14. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    What the hell are you? The snake rescuer? Do you just prowl the roads on your GoPro equipped TW looking for snakes, or what? :confused

    JK! But, two TW snake videos in two days? :lol3

    But, you're right. They're very instinct driven animals, but they are well evolved for survival in their native environment. And many well camouflaged species instinctively stay still as a defense mechanism, as well as in many cases a predatory one. And it's an effective behavior too, in a natural habitat. Not so much out in the road though. The copperhead I came across on my TW recently was in a gravel road. When I circled back to make sure I had identified him correctly, and I'll admit, with the initial intent to run him over, he never budged. Until I got within striking distance. Then he bit and hauled ass.
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  15. nihil

    nihil Adventurer

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    Hah! The moccasin that struck at me was in 2018, the black snake was last weekend. The bars and mirrors got upgraded when I dumped it and broke my ankle. I have other animal videos up though. There was the dead bird that fell out of the sky and almost hit me, and the hawk carrying a dead squirrel that I almost hit. I think I've got the turtle video around here somewhere, but he was just pissed off and hissing from inside his shell the whole time. Good times.
  16. FEG32

    FEG32 Too old and fat for any of this.....

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    It's a 2000. it was a former safety course trainer that I picked up pretty cheap. It has a couple of issues that are consistent with its former life but other than that it's in really great shape. I'm guess the trade off for slow speed miles was all of the abuse the starter and clutch took. I had the clutch done soon after I brought it home but now I wish I had done it myself.
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  17. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    So, as mentioned in an earlier post, I had a speedo and high beam indicator bulb burned out. Since I needed to replace them anyway, I decided to go with LEDs. And then, in the interest of saving a few more precious watts of power, I decided to try a pair of LED 1157 bulbs in the front turn signals/running lights. I had asked if they would work if I left the original halogens in the rear and didn't receive a reply. On some bikes it works fine as the rear bulbs have enough resistance to make things working normally. On others, it doesn't... So I decided to order some anyway, and try them to see for myself which the TW would be.

    Well, I can now answer that question... Even with the original halogen rear bulbs, the LEDs up front still trigger the hyper flash issue. If I have to replace the flasher anyway, I may as well go ahead and use the other two bulbs in the rear. The rears of course are only turn signal indicators and have no running light function. No more than they operate, they won't really do much in terms of saving power. But, they do seem a bit brighter than stock, and I have them because they came in a pack of four. So, why not?

    So, can anyone tell me of an appropriate LED flasher unit that will work on the TW? And before I start tearing things apart, can you tell me where it's located on the TW?

    TIA

    And as another data point that some may be interested in knowing, I ordered the plain white version and will say that they make the lights appear more yellow than amber as they do with the stock bulbs. It still has enough of a yellow color to provide light discrimination, IMO. But, if anyone wants to retain the darker more amber color, you may want to try ordering amber bulbs instead of the white light version.

    Of course, if some one just wants to save power, it's simple to just unplug the running light lead and use the fronts as turn signals only. If memory serves, the stock running lights use 8 watts of power each. So just unplugging them, saves 16W total. I wanted to retain the running lights for conspicuity reasons though, so opted to go with the LEDs instead even though they do consume a few watts.
  18. JB44

    JB44 Been here awhile

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    Can't find the photo, but the manual says it's part #7: Correction, that's the fuse location.

    [​IMG]

    The manual shows it's located up by the headlight fairing.

    I'm guessing that is for the pre-2001 TWs.

    As I recall ( on the 2001+) it's fastened to a bracket on the frame downtube with a rubber fitting.

    I took the stock flasher to an auto parts store and picked out any electronic flasher that had the same pin pattern.

    jb
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  19. JB44

    JB44 Been here awhile

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    I think the manual is wrong (or is for the pre-2001 TW's).

    From the diagram and my faulty memory, it looks to me like it's part # 24.

    I remember the stock flasher melting on the header pipe when I forgot to remount it to the bracket after working on the carb.

    jb
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  20. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Thanks. Wasn't sure if it was under the tank or seat, or... The right side panel is easy. :thumb

    I looked up the original factory part and saw what pin pattern it uses, then a quick look at a thread on TW200 Forum turned up a link to an Amazon listing for an adjustable electronic flasher that worked. I've used similar ones in the past and sort of like the adjustment feature. $7.99 delivered Sunday was a bit cheaper than the nonadjustable ones I saw last week at the auto parts store while there buying some other things. New LEDs for the dash indicator lights aren't coming until tomorrow anyway, so it looks like I can button this thing all back up on Sunday.

    Decided to get a new rear tire as well since the one on the bike is original, has about 5000 miles on it, and is over 11 years old. Tire's here. Just waiting on the tube...

    Original is still serviceable, but the new one is... well... new. And it has a good bit more knob height so should have a bit better grip in the tough stuff... Hoping to get back over to the Alabama Skyway next weekend, and complete the route I began on my Himalayan this past weekend. Supposed to rain this coming week so will likely encounter more mud than last weekend, and that route is tough enough even when mostly dry...

    IMG_0402.JPG
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