The Yamaha TW200 Thread...

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by neepuk, Jan 10, 2009.

  1. assquatch20

    assquatch20 Hosscat

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    I'm no expert, but I know a little, and I think it's a full wave bridge rectifier that does it.
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  2. JagLite

    JagLite Long timer Supporter

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    It's magic! :rayof

    Like the button you push to have the invisible giant kick start your bike for you... :dunno
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  3. Cyclepath

    Cyclepath Lost wanderer

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    This hasn't got a lot to do with a TW except I am moving down here to southern Oregon were there are a lot more backwoods riding available. I took these pictures in my lady friends front yard and that turkey is so tame now he eats dog food out of my hand.
    The most turkeys I have counted in her front yard is 40. She owns and 90 acre ranch. Soon the new chicks will be following the hens.

    Attached Files:

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  4. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    Plenty of them around here also, some towns they were attacking people in their yards there was so many.
  5. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    I see them pretty much every time I ride. Had a close encounter with one just last weekend while riding the TW. It was crossing a dirt road up ahead. When she noticed me she changed her mind and decided to run up the road up ahead of me instead. Then, as I was gaining on her she decided to abandon running and take to the wing. She lifted off as I drew even closer, then decided to turn left in front of me. I slowed a bit to give her time, and as she flew across the road diagonally I passed directly underneath her with her barely a foot over my head. Closest I've ever been to a turkey that wasn't on a plate. My main concern was that she would decide to lighten the load in order to gain altitude as I got so close to her as she attempted get away. I had a very similar occurrence a few years ago with a buzzard. And the buzzard DID lighten the load! :eekers In that case, it was flying parallel with me, about 2 feet above, and luckily about 2 feet to my left. That was a close call!

    Attacking people in their yards?! That's nuts! While we have a healthy population of turkeys in my area, they tend to be very wary creatures that shy way from any sort of human contact. I can't even imagine them behaving aggressively. That's just weird as hell! :loco
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  6. Yamasakialo

    Yamasakialo Adventurer Supporter

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    I used to know a guy that had a Male turkey that just decided to live in his yard. He was like a dog. He wouldn't bother the people that lived there but he would chase a pack anybody else that came up. Ask me how I know.
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  7. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    I had the exact same thing happen last year, one ran then took off and flew down the dirt road as I got closer and closer till I was about 5 feet from it and it gained altitude and turned off.
    It flew quite a distance down the road and I think I could have maintained speed and grabbed it if I wanted to.
  8. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Yeah, with the buzzard, I know I could have reached up with my left hand and plucked a tail feather if I'd wanted. He was flying parallel with me, just to the left as he was trying to gain altitude. Once I saw he was clear enough I got back on the gas and came up alongside. That's when he decided to lighten the load. And let me tell you! When a buzzard poops, it isn't a nice little poop like most birds. No sir! It had the volume approaching a mid sized dog's. I'm just glad he was a bit to my left!

    The turkey took flight to my right, and going parallel, then decided to veer left directly into my path. I slowed to avoid hitting it, then passed directly behind it as it crossed right to left at about head level. I could have reached out and touched it with my left hand as well.

    Had a friend years ago that hit a large owl one night. He never even saw it. Just experienced a hard impact to his left shoulder that was hard enough to turn his torso to the left with enough force that his hand was ripped from the bar. It also removed his left mirror. He turned around and went back to see what it was after the collision. He said it was the largest damn owl he'd ever seen.
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  9. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Life is for good friends and great adventures Supporter

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    Buzzards in a real panic will also regurgitate whatever they have been feasting on to lighten the load. Have heard of someone getting sprayed with festering meat and other unsavory stomach contents at the same time as being shit on. Not nice under any circumstances but especially not on a hot day, a long way from the nearest shower or hosepipe.
  10. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    :puke2
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  11. Cyclepath

    Cyclepath Lost wanderer

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    Hahaha you guys are funny I never expected all of these Bird stories over a turkey. LOL you want to talk about hitting birds I had a pheasant hit me directly in the chest as it flew up out of the ditch to cross the road I was going about 65 miles an hour and he damn near knocked me off the back of my motorcycle at that time I was riding a triumph Bonneville. and then maybe 10 years ago I was touring on my goldwing when a giant Mallard flew up out of a ditch couldn't get enough altitude and took the right side mirror off. That night in camp I had him for supper. LOL I think that's called living off the land. Hahaha
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  12. Cyclepath

    Cyclepath Lost wanderer

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    Maybe we should start a thread called close encounters of the bird kind lol ️
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  13. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Ok, so not on the subject of TW's, motorcycles, or even birds, but of hosepipes!

    I see you list your location as both England and Louisiana... I'm originally from Louisiana, and once long ago, I had a girl there that used that term. I think she was the only person I've ever heard call a water/garden hose a hosepipe, before or since... until now. She could never explain to me where she learned to call it that. So, I gotta ask, is that a term you picked up in Louisiana or England??
  14. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Life is for good friends and great adventures Supporter

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    I honestly couldn't say. My father ran a nursery/garden center in England so I grew up very familiar with the device and probably heard it called a hose (which is, presumably, short for "hose-pipe" or maybe not?) but I've been here for nearly 30 years now and I often get confused about the origins of the language I use.

    I remember reading a humorous translation guide to British v's American terms for tools and car parts: Bonnet v's hood; Spanner v's wrench; etc. It said that Brits call a spark plug a sparking plug, which is a term I have NEVER heard anyone in Britain use, until about two days ago. :dunno
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  15. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Yeah, I used to read the British motorcycle rags and between that and the internet I've picked up a lot of the different terms for things along those lines. I just don't recall anyone other than my ex-GF, and you, referring to a water hose as a "hosepipe". Was just curious about the origin as it's unusual in the places I've lived. Also dated a British personal fitness trainer a little while back. She's lived here for over 20 years, and her accent is so thick that I STILL could barely understand her half the time! :lol3 Not at all the British accent that I'm accustomed to from TV and movies. :confused She also had a lot of common language terms that, while I normally knew what she meant, was very foreign to me. It was at times entertaining, and other times, frustrating...
  16. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    Is that the vacuum slide vent?
    If so, stock there is a tube that runs to under the bike. If you go through deep water it hoses up the slide moving and the fix is to install a T or a Y and run the other hose up under the tank so water drains right out.

    [​IMG]

    No, it looks like the fuel feed to the carb?
  17. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Oops, sorry for the confusion, wrong thread, wrong bike. Will delete and repost in the appropriate place...
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  18. assquatch20

    assquatch20 Hosscat

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    So I saw this today:

    [​IMG]

    It's a concept from this fella. Kinda neat but very familiar.
  19. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    Talk (and pictures) are cheap, the real deal is a bit harder.
    That bike might be 400 pounds and cost $10,000.00.
    Looks like a lot of fun though!
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  20. assquatch20

    assquatch20 Hosscat

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    I'd rather it be a TW450. Preferably still air-cooled, but improve the brakes and suspension to some degree. You could probably build it under 300lbs. Keep the seat height fairly low as well as a deep 1st gear for paddling and tractoring. Bring back the kickstart. But whatever you do, don't stop making the 200. It's grandfathered in and too cheap not to build, I'd imagine.

    They'd probably never make a TW line but it would be neat. More than likely they'd have to go FI and liquid cooled though, which kinda goes against the ethos of the Tdub, to me. The option to have a tall, well-suspended bike with a fat tire is nice too, but also maybe not what a TW is supposed to be.
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