The Yamaha TW200 Thread...

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by neepuk, Jan 10, 2009.

  1. Randy

    Randy Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2002
    Oddometer:
    4,799
    Location:
    Newnan, GA USA
    Thanks, I'll check it out.

    As far as suspension, I did the Race Tech Emulators to the forks of each. The Emulators really made a huge difference in the forks on the TW. And it with the XT, not only did it improve fork action in a similar fashion, but it made the bike feel like a completely different machine. It made the whole bike feel somehow more planted and stable in a fashion I didn't expect. But the longer travel, and the better shock and linkage setup of my XT is night and day compared to my TW in the suspension dept. over rough terrain. I find myself riding considerably faster aboard the XT than I ever did on the TW over the same dirt/gravel roads. This may or may not be a good thing due to the inherent risks that comes with greater speeds. But strictly from a suspension, and comfort, perspective, it's easier on the XT. Been a while since I'd been on the TW, but today reminded me just how much the suspension hampers the bike's performance at speed. I mean, the TW is still great within it's limits. It's limits are just a bit lower (slower) over the same terrain, IMO. Today also reminded me of why I bought it in the first place... to slow down and just cruise along at a more relaxed pace. It's very good for that. Every time I ride it, I can't help but think of a Rokon....

    The XT encourages me to ride a bit more aggressively, getting on top of the bike, pushing it down underneath me, and steering with the throttle, riding it like a dirt bike in the dirt and gravel. Sort of like a smaller, much less powerful, and more primitive version of my KTM. On the other hand, I have to really be pushing the TW to ride it like a dirt bike as it seems to prefer to be ridden like a street bike. Riding a bike in a street style on loose surfaces is sketchy, IMO. At least at a faster pace... Another reason that the TW is best when ridden slower and not really pushed. Just a different sort of thing.

    Planning to ride the XT tomorrow, some of which will be on the same route I had the TW on today. So, I'll have a better back to back impression then...
    JagLite likes this.
  2. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2010
    Oddometer:
    10,314
    Location:
    Southern New Jersey
    Choice is good!
    JagLite likes this.
  3. Randy

    Randy Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2002
    Oddometer:
    4,799
    Location:
    Newnan, GA USA
    Most likely. I installed a kick start on my XT a few weeks ago. I think the older XT200 was one of the models that I researched in order to sort out all of the correct parts for the XT225. All of the internal parts are the same as the kick start I installed on the TW last fall. The only difference is the external kick lever assembly. I cross referenced parts diagrams from a lot of different bikes trying to determine what parts were necessary to assemble the kick start mechanism. All parts are still available for the TW kick start. And, since the internal parts are the same for the XT, all of those parts are obviously available as well. The fly in the ointment is, the XT's lever assembly is no longer available ANYWHERE. And I looked. Luckily, a member here on ADV had an original NIB Yamaha kit for the XT that he'd purchased but never installed. He decided to sell the XT and offered me his kick start kit. I bought it, installed it, then the very next day needed it when I discovered, 66 miles from home, in the middle of nowhere, that I had a bad regulator/rectifier...
    nicholastanguma and JagLite like this.
  4. JagLite

    JagLite Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2010
    Oddometer:
    8,909
    Location:
    Anchorage Alaska
    The TW front rim is aluminum. :thumb

    I searched worldwide for an aluminum 14" rear rim with no success.
    I thought I found a manufacturer in Korea but the middleman couldn't source one.
    I looked at spun aluminum atv rims that could be drilled for spokes but they don't make the right width.

    It would be worth doing if there was a rim available just to see if the improvement is noticeable. :hmmmmm

    I built a Honda XR 200R with excellent suspension and wheels that weighs 200 lbs and is a blast to ride.
    The problem is that it is fun to ride fast because it is flickable, light, has great power and suspension. :ricky


    At my age (66) I need to NOT ride fast because the sudden stops in a crash hurts a lot more than it did 30 and 40 years ago.
    I thought about that last weekend when I took the XR and the Rickman to the local mx track for some fun riding and was hitting one of the table top jumps in 4th gear on the XR.
    I didn't crash or even fall over this time but I really need to stay away from the track... :dirtdog

    The TW never persuades me to go fast offroad, it is fun to ride slow and enjoy the scenery :ricky instead of seeing how fast I can go past the scenery. :shog
    Nobade, JB44, Randy and 1 other person like this.
  5. Cliff h

    Cliff h [IMG]http://i219.pho

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2011
    Oddometer:
    335
    Location:
    Wasilla, Ak
    OnOff:

    I like your Bikes!
    In my stable are:
    '12 TW200
    '12 XT250
    '04 DRZ 400
    '20 Beta 500 RR-S

    I want to run the EXACT rear tail light and turn signal setup and rear fender combo you are running on your Beta, the one in image 156 of your photo album! I have experimented with a couple options, but no dice yet. Any information about your setup would be greatly appreciated!!
    PM me if you prefer

    Regards,
    Cliff
    OnOff likes this.
  6. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2010
    Oddometer:
    10,314
    Location:
    Southern New Jersey
    65F out, sun with a few clouds, some local singletrack was fun.

    [​IMG]
    The red was really intense but it does not show in the pictures...
    [​IMG]

    The open area's are a nice change:
    [​IMG]
    30 miles of fun, then I came home to find my X ring chain had arrived.
    I fit it, went for a local street blast, then checked the slack, its good.
    When I upgraded the front sprocket I took the original chain off and found it dry and rusty in the master link.
    I had ordered a new sealed chain so I did not bother lubing it like it should be, and at 750 miles it was mostly worn out.
    If you keep that chain, you need to soak it in some used motor oil after every long ride, melted grease is better, what we used to do before sealed chains...
    The DID X ring may last as long as I have the TW.
    Coming up on 1000 miles and really liking the bike.
    As others have said, in the past, I would fly down the trails at high speed looking only at the trail where the wheels were going, picking a line.
    It was fun, it is fun, and I still do it, even on the TW, but I often find myself going slower and looking around, and exploring, and I have found some really cool places and trails in the woods and have seen some deer very close.
    Nothing I know of with two wheels does slow better then a TW.
    1Scorpion, JB44, Ride Now and 6 others like this.
  7. NxtGoRnd

    NxtGoRnd This Time Around, Wearing Out Tires Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2014
    Oddometer:
    3,339
    Location:
    South of Atlanta, North of Macon
  8. Slowklr

    Slowklr Attempting to fall in style

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2019
    Oddometer:
    82
    Location:
    Texas
    To those that have had both, tw200 or wr250r? I know they are pretty different, but I'm looking for something lightweight and that will get around pretty good.
  9. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2010
    Oddometer:
    10,314
    Location:
    Southern New Jersey
    Could not be more different.
    The WR is VERY tall, lots of power at high rpm, suspension set up to go fast over rough stuff.
    The TW is low seat height, low power output, but a wide power band, with fat tires and marginal suspension for going fast over rough stuff.
    Grand prix car to a tractor?

    Oh, and top speed,
    TW-70 mph sometimes, 60 mph most times.
    WR-90 mph.
    Cyclepath, JagLite and Randy like this.
  10. ChopperCharles

    ChopperCharles Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2006
    Oddometer:
    5,917
    Location:
    Durham, NC
    Had fun with a bunch of Tee-dubs in the mountains this weekend. I was on my SSR Buccaneer 250i, and was hanging with the fast(ish) group on KTMs and big ADV bikes on the pavement. Especially up the mountain, where the Tee-dubs were falling back and having trouble with the climb. I was reasonably happy with my performance on dirt roads. I was taking things quicker than I have before and letting the rear slide out a bit and just having a blast. There was a lot of poorly maintained dirt, with potholes and water wash outs and whatnot... and though I was going at a decent clip, I got passed like I was standing still by those tee-dubs. They made it clear I have a street bike, and when it comes to dirt roads, they will haul ass right past me. I have a skinny 100/90/19 front and 130/80/17 rear. The fastest guy had a giant ATV (or ATC?) tire on the rear and sidewall lugs like garden spades. He went wide in a corner, into a ditch, and just floored it right out like it didn't even happen. It was a blast riding with those guys. I wished I still had a tee-dub when we were on the dirt sections. I actually skipped the section with the baby head rocks because I was already bottoming my front suspension trying to keep up on the roads we were already on. Plus it was getting late and I had a 4 hour ride to get home in front of me.

    Charles.
    OnOff, Ride Now, 1Scorpion and 4 others like this.
  11. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2010
    Oddometer:
    10,314
    Location:
    Southern New Jersey
    Every bike has its place, and you can have fun on anything with two wheels if it runs.
    And even if it does not run, the downhill parts can be fun...

    That SSR seems to be a good 250cc bike.
    What is the suspension travel on it?
    JagLite likes this.
  12. ChopperCharles

    ChopperCharles Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2006
    Oddometer:
    5,917
    Location:
    Durham, NC
    No idea the travel. For the street I've never bottomed, not even once. On the dirt, with big pot holes and rocks and such I kept hearing the front forks make soft clanging noises, indicatign they were bottoming out. I'm a fatass though, so most people probably won't have that problem. I never did bottom the rear shock though. The rear shock is really exceptional, IMO.

    Charles.
  13. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2010
    Oddometer:
    10,314
    Location:
    Southern New Jersey
    More after work fun.
    [​IMG]

    New trails close to home:
    [​IMG]
    75F out and sunny, but its getting dark early.
    The holes are fun when they fill up with water:
    [​IMG]

    Coming up on 1000 miles.
    What a nice way to spend an hour or two after work.

    I ordered a Kenda K270 tire in 4.60x18 for the front, the current knobby does not seem to grip as well as I thought it would.
  14. RCEMT-P

    RCEMT-P Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2011
    Oddometer:
    131
    Location:
    Northern MI
    I've got a tw and a wrr. When I bought the tw, I was in love for about 1.5 seasons. Darn near got ran over of the 2 lane road around here. Ran out and bought a wrr. I cant say I'm in love with it. Too darn tall and I've spend alot of money already to lower it, and get the twitchy throttle out of it. The wrr wants to always accelerate. The tw can just cruise nice and slow in the woods. The wrr is a miserable herky jerky beast. I've got a buyer for my tw but I'm really having a hard time letting it go as I'm not enjoying my wrr offroad at all. It's an awesome highway bike and two track bike but on single track I'd take the tw as the wrr is so tall and insanely top heavy once she leans a touch too far you ain't gonna recover or you better be strong with a good back. Depends what you do. Honestly if they didnt bump our speed limit to 65 which means 70 to 75 for everybody I'd keep my tw, but it struggles to hold an honest 60.
    JagLite likes this.
  15. frog13

    frog13 Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,303
    Location:
    SW Ohio
    Now THAT is funny!
  16. nicholastanguma

    nicholastanguma nicholastanguma Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2009
    Oddometer:
    3,030
    Location:
    Downtown Los Angeles

    I'm surprised to hear this. That front tire looks plenty knobby enough to afford good traction. What's going on? :hmmmmm
    NxtGoRnd likes this.
  17. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2010
    Oddometer:
    10,314
    Location:
    Southern New Jersey
    I am not sure, its a rear tire on the front, I ran it on the back of my klx230 and it was ok.
    It seems very slippery in many situations, it does sand ok, but overall it seems to slide a lot.
    I had a big shinko 244 on my last TW and it seemed to stick well.
    Maybe because the knobs are all in a line it can slip sideways?
    One ride out (in the rain with a friend) I fell 3 times, a record for me on the TW.
    Time to try something different!

    Oh, and on a test ride with the new chain, I hit 78 mph indicated on a slight down hill.
    That would be about 73 actual mph....

    JagLite likes this.
  18. Cyclepath

    Cyclepath Lost wanderer

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,290
    Location:
    SW. Wa. state
    Keep them both........ best of both worlds. :-)
  19. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2010
    Oddometer:
    10,314
    Location:
    Southern New Jersey
    KLX230 seems like a good match, DRZ400 (kind of tall), old Super Sherpa, dr350.
    Or a Euro bike if you have the cash and want to go really fast off road.

    Its odd how the Japanese miss the US market, I guess its just a very small part of their sales.
    We need a 350 with a 6 speed, 300 pounds or less, with the ability to adjust the height a bit and at least 3 gallons of gas.
    The WR is very tall and only a 250, if it was a 350 it could have a wide power band and still hit 90 mph.
    Sorry, but a 250 just will not do in the US, its fine in the dirt, but not on many roads.

    Kawasaki came out with a very nice brand new bike, the KLX230. Its air cooled, has great fuel injection, very good power and torque
    for its size, the suspension is quite good for a cheap dual sport, its got a great 6 speed trans and the weight is under 300 pounds.
    It just needed to be a 350.

    Suzuki came out with a brand new street bike, it was a 400 pound low power very ugly 250cc twin, how exciting!

    The best thing to do is to buy 3 or 4 old DR350's and set one up nicely and use the others for spare parts because you are not going to see anything like it anymore, or the XT225, they just can not build bikes like that anymore.







    JagLite, Ride Now, Cyclepath and 2 others like this.
  20. Randy

    Randy Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2002
    Oddometer:
    4,799
    Location:
    Newnan, GA USA
    That would be my answer as well. No one bike is perfect for everything. And, IMO, trying to find that "perfect" bike to do it all creates too many compromises, and leads to regrets of purchases, and/or sales. This of course, is dependent on what types of riding one enjoys and actually does. In you only do single track, or only do street, two up cross country tour, or whatever, then... But, I enjoy too many different forms of motorcycling to expect one bike to do it all any more than I expect any one pair of shoes to fit every occasion...