Think an 08 Multistrada 1100 will handle South America?

Discussion in 'Americas' started by Matcrisp, Jan 30, 2019.

  1. Matcrisp

    Matcrisp n00b

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    I know everyone here rides KLRs, KTMs and BMWs. I have had my Multi since 2012 and I know its issues and limits pretty well. It has been very reliable. I am a little afraid of not being able to find a mechanic willing to work on it between large cities. Has anyone here had success on a Ducati in Central and South America? I find very few relevant results if I search Multistrada on this site.

    Hopefully I will take off and start a thread on epic ride reports soon.

    Thanks

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    #1
  2. 805gregg

    805gregg Long timer

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    Too large, you need a 650
    #2
  3. Tewster2

    Tewster2 Long timer Supporter

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    "I am a little afraid of not being able to find a mechanic willing to work on it between large cities".....you answered the question.
    #3
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  4. Lucky Explorer

    Lucky Explorer Traveled the world

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    In '97 my wife and I rode a 900 Elefant to Tierra del Fuego. No engine issues. But minor issues: fork seals, rear shock, simple electrical. All handled with local MC shops. Tire change in Ushuaia, but I had pre shipped tires there, as tough to supply back then.
    Allen
    #4
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  5. shrederscott

    shrederscott Long timer

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    Hey

    I would NOT take that bike on that trip

    If you have to ask ...you probably should not

    Scott
    #5
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  6. Tewster2

    Tewster2 Long timer Supporter

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    My thoughts on my pre-planing my SA trip regarding a bike is this...if I can't pick it up by myself I won't take it...if it's so expensive that I wouldn't leave it beside the road if I need to cut and run because of whatever I won't take it....if parts are not readily available I won't take it....if it makes me look like a rich gringo I won't take it....if tires are not readily available because of the OEM wheel sizes I won't take it....if it can't run on 80 octane fuel without damage I won't take it....if it's so big I can't get it through the door of a cheap motel I won't take it.

    For me, my Mighty DR is gonna be perfect for South America.

    I read hundreds of ride reports to learn what has worked for others for the areas I want to ride....general consensus is guiding my choices.
    #6
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  7. Matcrisp

    Matcrisp n00b

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    Thanks for the good points. I am not always one to listen to solid reasoning, but it gives me good issues to consider.

    I plan to enjoy the freeway portions of the trip, so I like a big bike built for that. I don't need to offroad more than necessary. I'll get a disk brake lock with alarm so I can leave the bike outside a hotel. I will fill up with regular today and see how the bike runs. I am not a big dude, but I can pick the bike up (I would struggle to pull it out of a ditch though). The bike is 11 years old so I feel like the rich gringo factor is wearing off. Most of these trip reports on KTMs I see are worth 3x my bikes price. I will get new tires. The parts guy at Ducati Moto Corsa in PDX told me he would ship me parts if I need some fast support.

    If anyone knows of any threads on here where someone rode a Multistrada South of the US border, please comment a link.
    #7
  8. The Breeze

    The Breeze Been here awhile

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    Take your bike and go!!! It’s the one you own!!

    Doesn’t sound like you’re going to seek out the super gnarly back roads...the size of your bike shouldn’t be a problem.

    I will point out that I encountered some pretty serious sand on the main dirt roads in Bolivia (may have changed since 2009) and possibly Peru. On these roads, I was glad to be on my DR650. But the rest of the time I was wanting for more power. Especially on the long stretches of the altiplano and when passing semis/trucks at altitude in the twisties. If you’re comfortable in the sand, you’ll be fine.

    At that time I concluded an 800 would be an ideal bike for S. America. If I was going to seek out hard core dirt roads/routes, I’d take a WR250R.

    But for your intended purpose...it really comes down to reliability. If you feel confident in the reliability of the bike, I’d take it... But, I’d fully service the bike prior to departure (including new chain/sprockets, and bearings all the way around). Take an extra set of fork seals with you and spare tubes. Know how to change a tire and have the tools to dot it roadside. I’d also try to find where you can purchase new tires along the way and make sure that you can source them locally. Shipping parts from the States works...but may take a long time being held up in customs.

    The bike has some age on it...and is substantially depreciated...so it’ll be painful, but not the end of the world if it gets stolen or you have to walk away from it. My Tiger800 has 70k Miles on it and is in the same category....which is why I took it through Mexico and Central America. I would take it to S. America in a heartbeat.

    Lastly, I would try to source a fuel bladder (I got mine from JustGasTanks). I had the 9 gallon gas tank on my DR in S. America....only needed it a couple of times (on a couple of mountain passes in the Andes - 300 miles between fuel). I just carry a rolled up fuel bladder now and fill it when I know i’ve got a long distance between fuel stops....which isn’t very often.

    Anyway, hope this helps. Have a great trip!!!
    #8
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  9. Matcrisp

    Matcrisp n00b

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    You hit the nail on the head. My bike would hardly fetch $4500 on craigslist. And I trust it more than some much newer more expensive bike because I know it's history. It sucks gas fast at high speeds, so I will consider a bladder.
    #9
  10. Lostmike

    Lostmike Cruising

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    IMG_0589.jpg He just did Columbia to Ushuaia on that and he’s heading to Alaska
    #10
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  11. RW66

    RW66 Been here awhile

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    You asked the question so I’ll give my .02.
    When I was a kid my dad farmed and we moved around a lot. I noticed that each place we moved to all the farmers seemed to use a different make of tractor. I never understood this until I got older. I found out that the farmers used the tractors with the best service in the area. No brand will help you if it is broke down and can’t get it fixed.
    I had a friend that understood this concept so when he got ready to travel SA and Europe he got a Honda. Why, they have service world wide. It is interesting to read ride reports and how people resolve issues on the road. I just finished on where a guy was on a Honda and it seemed he found everything he needed wherever he was. I think that is why the KLR is popular because it is a simple bike and any good bolt twister can fix it.
    I don’t know your experience for the Duk but I have a Triumph and it is a big problem finding service for it in the US and Mexico. I have read reports where people have ridden them all the way south but with the trouble I have had I would not want to try it.
    The one advantage you have is you know your bike and if you feel you can fix most of what would go wrong without outside help. Then take it and have fun.
    #11
  12. CaveJohnson

    CaveJohnson Adventurer

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    If there's any chance of you waiting to start your trip until August, I could use a riding partner on the way down to Santiago ;)
    #12