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Thoughts on Electric Motorcycles?

Discussion in 'Electric Motorcycles' started by Designer Jake, Feb 2, 2013.

  1. 81forest

    81forest ADDRider

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    I agree, I don't think we have an energy production problem either. But I do think we are going to run out of fossil fuels. :pep
  2. 81forest

    81forest ADDRider

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    [​IMG]
  3. Wraith Rider

    Wraith Rider Banned

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    Maybe. Maybe not. At the moment, we don't have to hurry.
  4. mhpr262

    mhpr262 Long timer

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    Commuting is a niche application, but riding 1000km in a day is not? :rofl:rofl:roflGuess how most miles are racked up worldwide ... 1000km motorcycle trips are probably 0,0001% of that number and commuting/ shopping trips less than 50 miles long make up 70% to 80%.

    Because a gas bike can travel 218 miles on one tank, right? A Fireblade or R1 going flat out has a range of maybe 60-70 miles - at most. Then figure in the detours to gas stations and the waiting time at the pump and the hassle with paying (often upfront in the US) and lets talk again. An EV has a full tank every morning and on th road a modern charger can refill it to 85% in 30 minutes.

    Someone else trotted out that old and tired argument that "electricity is dirtier than gas because coal plants pollute too". That would not even be true if 100% of your power came from coal plants, in reality the number is 37% and falling quickly. California e.g. is completely coal free. The vast majority of EVs are charged at night when most of the energy is from hydro and nuclear.

    It's like some people are desperately fighting against progress.
  5. mhpr262

    mhpr262 Long timer

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    Nonsense ...

    So, replacing gas cars with EV is going to take a long time? Yep, so obviously it's better for everybody we don't even start doing it in the first place! :huh

    Pretty much every single part of a battery can be fully recycled, including the lithium, and it sure won't cost "trillions of dollars". Trillions of dollars is what gas car owners are spending at the gas sstation every year to pollute their own environment. Maybe, just maybe the owners will have to pay some small fee and battery recycling will be a viable industry that provides thousands of middle and working class jobs ... just like the oil industry??

    Oh, Big Oil might have to remove the structures they have been adorning the landscape with over the past 80 years? Cry me a river! Guess what, pretty much every structure one builds will have to be torn down again sooner or later. Factories don't last forever even without the advent of electric cars. Seriously, that is one argument I have never heard before, and with good reason ...

    Where did you get the nonsense with the 1000 nuclear plants? Lots of EV owners have just a couple of solar panels on their roofs and manage to fully offset their vehicle's (and house's!) energy use over the year. In fact one of the things that make electrcity expensive is that there is huge demand at noon and very little at night, so vastly oversized plants have to be built for the day peak and then have to idle at night.

    The solar panels buffer the peak during the day and allows the utilities to run fewer and smaller plants because in practice EVs will do 95% of their charging at night in their owner's garages and help even out the demand. One of the biggest problems of offshore wind power farms is that they could produce the most power at night when the wind blows strongest ... but have to be switched off right then because there is no demand. And it gets even better with "vehicle to grid" systems where utilities pay EV owners to feed power back into the grid from their car's battery to buffer the system.

    Large scale EV adoption could give sustainable energy the boost it need to become viable without subsidies, it would massively reduce ROI time for windpower.

    And no "planet ruining strip mining" would be required either. In the future power generation will be much more decentralized, with fewer losses and shorter lines.
  6. CanadianRocky

    CanadianRocky No Bucket List... a Bucket full of Lists

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    You attitude that the future will fix the future, is naive at best, and extremely dangerous at its worst.

    The infrastructure costs of decommissioning PetroPower and building E-power to make the switch would have to added to the cost of replacing our collapsing current infrastructure, such as roads, bridges, schools, hospitals, etc, etc. We don't even have enough money for that.

    There isn't enough money. The was the point of my post.

    And please don't think for a moment that I am Pro PetroPower. I am not. It is an unmitigated disaster. We are just as blinded to its current state of problems as we are to E-power as a solution to transportation by using current thinking on how to produce Electricity.

    Neither work as a sustainable way for humans to move forward for the next several hundred years.

    Electricity will be here for a very long time. It discovery was no less important to the human condition than learning to control fire.

    The only hope I see for sustaining our current addiction to Electricity and personal transportation, is Cold Fusion.

    Of course, that only applies if what we want to do is to save the planet so that we can live here.

    If we don't care about that, then it doesn't matter what we do.

    Come on MR Fusion.
  7. CanadianRocky

    CanadianRocky No Bucket List... a Bucket full of Lists

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    :lol3:lol3
  8. mhpr262

    mhpr262 Long timer

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    That's a bit of a contradiction, isn't it? It is not even understood how cold fusion actually works, nor can the reaction be replicated at will last time I looked.

    I don't think cold fusion (or hot fusion) are our only chances. More wind, wave, tidal and solar power combined with modern fission technology (Thorium, molten salt and traveling wave reactors) should be enough. And, of course, more efficient use, which is the link of the chain with the biggest potential right now.
  9. Lion BR

    Lion BR I'd rather be riding

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    Can you find the obvious contradiction on your post? Your rational would not pass a middle school proposal for a science experiment. I will not point it out to you. Your homework is to find it and correct it. :D

    I'm just kidding of course. But the contradiction is there, making your whole argument useless.:deal

    Having said that, I do enjoy internal combustion engines and I will enjoy them for as much as I can before the inevitable...
  10. 81forest

    81forest ADDRider

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    (81 scratches head, trying to imagine what molten salt looks like...)

    Thanks for weighing in, excellent points and info. There is still a huge reluctance, at least here in the US, to consider EVs as a viable alternative. We've heard most of the common arguments against them here in this thread already. Another factor is that gas is still so "cheap," even though we like to complain about $4USD a gallon. As we all should know by now, the external cost is a hell of a lot more than that, but you don't feel it at the pump.

    I think that most EV manufacturers have figured out (and rightly so IMO) that in order to break into this market, they need to appeal to gear heads. If an e-bike is going to sell here, it has to be fun to ride, lots of power, and look cool. They haven't really nailed the "look cool" part yet... but the performance is there. Unfortunately they are still not catching on, and as of last year Zero was still losing money on every bike it sold. I think it would be a real shame if they can't make it as a business, because they have developed some amazing technology in their motors and throttle controllers.

    A 289 lb. bike with 44 hp/ 70 ft. lb. of torque, with a range of 100 miles on a single charge is enough for me to want one, and I hope it will be my next bike. As mhpr points out, the majority of motorcycle trips taken fit well within the limitations of that range. Even two years ago, Zeros looked ridiculous and were not a whole lot of fun to ride, and the other e-bikes were rich-guy expensive. But in 2015 they should be selling like hot cakes.
  11. evermore

    evermore Been here awhile

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    The Russian Alfa-class submarines used a liquid metal (lead-bismuth) to cool their reactors. *mind blown*
  12. the_sandman_454

    the_sandman_454 Been here awhile

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    As long as the new energy solutions are adopted by actual market forces because the science and economics behind the solutions make sense rather than just because of a strong lobbyist group (like using ethanol in fuel).

    I think the electric bike would be fun to play with, but until they get charging time down to the approximate time to refuel a gas bike, it won't be practical for much beyond playing off road within a relatively short range of your base camp, or maybe for commuting for those with shorter commutes.
  13. Renegade_Azzy

    Renegade_Azzy Kamen Rider

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    Anyone who things a plastic paneled, composite built vehicle that has moving parts will put evil uncle McOil out of business needs to put down the hookah for a day or 10.

    I want a fuel cell bike, and and to know, for best performance, what sort of oil should I use in it? :rofl What kind of fork oil should I use? Cable lube? Brake fluid?

    tires?

    And what is that nice patch of black stuff you ride on made from?
  14. HanShotFirst

    HanShotFirst Been here awhile

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    Even after we hit peak oil, we will still be using oil for a LOT of things and vehicles. There are no electric air liners, jet fighters, or blue water cargo ships. For at least the next 150 years, even if "peak oil" hit tomorrow, we will be using oil for the things that only oil can do.

    Electric vehicle technology has a good ways to go before it's ready for prime time, but you have to start somewhere.
  15. HanShotFirst

    HanShotFirst Been here awhile

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    Which made them one of the noisiest (but fastest) nuke boats ever made. But yeah, that is some cool out of the box thinking. Had the Alfa been quieter, that would have been one seriously scary sub. Top speed was about 45kts submerged and they had a test depth nearly twice as deep as any US fast attack nuke boat. Okay, back to electric bikes.
  16. HanShotFirst

    HanShotFirst Been here awhile

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    I think there is a serious future for electric police bikes in large cities. Especially if they can make them with swappable batteries that can be charged via solar when not in the bikes. The maintenance savings would nearly cover the increased cost of the bike. And if solar could charge the batteries, they kind of get a "free ride".

    But it will be many years before we see a truly viable ADV or touring electric bike. The technology and economics just aren't there, nor is there anything on the drawing boards currently that is going to get us there. So an electric bike would make an awesome second bike for the enthusiast, or when coupled with a solar charging system, a very good urban commuter. Ride the bike M, W, F and take your ICE car/motorcycle/scooter to work on Tuesdays and Thursdays. That could make some sense, but the cost to buy an electric bike needs to come down some also to make the economics work better.

    If I lived in a large city, I'd give serious consideration to the electric bike...and then I'd probably go buy a high MPG scooter.
  17. LowInSlo

    LowInSlo Been here awhile

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    I agree. As a commuter and play bike, especially off-road, electric is ready. It's just the price.
  18. 390beretta

    390beretta Long timer

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    Sorry you live there. Really!
  19. 81forest

    81forest ADDRider

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    ...or for beating the fastest gas powered bikes in the open class at Pike's Peak?

    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/4cX-_eB8nkk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
  20. CanadianRocky

    CanadianRocky No Bucket List... a Bucket full of Lists

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    If I had known there was going to be grading and homework, I never would have signed up to the Internet.