Three old guys to Alaska - goldwings and a 300 versys

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by Fuzzy74, Jun 4, 2019.

  1. wingtraveler

    wingtraveler asphalt to dirt

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2018
    Oddometer:
    196
    Location:
    norwich,ny
    awesome report makes my trip next july feel alot better i am also taking my wing to alaska ive been planning for a little more then a year now and i have a year to go reading about the wing on the tow highway makes me want to try it but just not sure yet i do have plans to do the Dalton to the circle thanks again for the info if you have any more you'd like to share just pm me always wanting to hear all i can thanks
    wilsonjw42 likes this.
  2. rtcoker

    rtcoker Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 20, 2015
    Oddometer:
    86
    Location:
    Smokies
    This thread has kept me entranced. Thank you so much for sharing and letting us enjoy vicariously. Great thoughts from NC 670
  3. Fuzzy74

    Fuzzy74 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2009
    Oddometer:
    826
    Location:
    Cumberland Plateau in Tennessee
    Day 24 – Back to Tok

    Took our time getting going. Nuke had a consulting call to be on and I took a long walk with my coffee. There was a tour group at adjacent motel riding Motoquest BMWs. Met an early riser by her bike. The tour was an Australian company renting the bikes from Motoquest. She and her husband from Colorado, but most on tour from Australia. 17 riders for 17 days in Alaska. They had a chase vehicle with spare parts and complete spare bike. Support fixed several flat tires on the Dalton. She couldn’t say enough positive about the tour. Interesting mounts for the Pelican bags on all the bikes. Would not be too hard to make and possibly use some lower cost Pelican copies. Might have been Givi racks.
    955E2A43-041A-40DE-BC2C-BC64BD9098F0.jpeg

    81D10FF2-2126-4099-BE4F-65B0FAED4AF2.jpeg

    Walking around drinking my morning coffee saw this t-shirt in shop window. If store had been open I might own it the shirt.
    1B68F001-159D-4BDB-A654-4B1B46731842.jpeg


    The ride out of Valdez was awesome in a narrow canyon following a river. We had been promised a lot of black bear but saw none. Climbing up to the pass the weather got cool. There was a 20 minute construction delay near top.
    DSCF0357.JPG
    DSCF0358.JPG

    We stopped at Glenallen for lunch and went to the same café. Apparently the tour bus was not the problem 2 days prior as it still took us an hour to get food. Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me.
    IMG_0591.JPG

    After Glennallen we took the Tok Cutoff road. It was a bit rougher with gravel patches and one long gravel construction zone with associated delay. Not much wildlife, saw one brown bear.


    In Tok we camped at the Thomson Eagle Claw Campground. In a nutshell, if thinking of camping within 50 miles of Tok, go there. Every site had a wire spool table with chairs and potted flowers on the table. There is a maintenance area with well stocked tools. People do tire changes, oil changes and other maintenance. Every year she buys additional tools she thinks bikers can use. Tent sites are $15 with firewood free. “I won’t charge people for something that doesn’t cost me anything” she said. Of course there is considerable labor in gathering and cutting wood and she had someone there fixing her log splitter. She has a day job at the airport and just loves to visit with the bikers who stop there coming to each camp site in evening to collect fee and issue your sticker. “I’m not a pussy. I camped at Thompson’s Eagle’s Claw Motorcycle Park in Tok, Alaska” in addition to campsites there are two bed cabins for $40. Bring own bedding. There is a Teepee for $25. I stayed in the Walled Tent for $25 with 2 Coleman cots and an old bench seat from a van to sit on. There are two 4 bed bunkhouses at $10 per bed. One person was in one bed so had the whole thing for $10. You can even stay in an ambulance for $25 with a large bed. She will fire up the sauna for anyone who asks. A propane stove is available along with soap and mosquito repellant. All the extras at no charge.
    5422E436-3B85-47CD-8470-C77135151252.jpeg

    My wall tent
    B929FAAD-861A-4C0D-8F3B-C91183B7D376.jpeg

    Attached Files:

  4. Fuzzy74

    Fuzzy74 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2009
    Oddometer:
    826
    Location:
    Cumberland Plateau in Tennessee
    Day 25 – Tok to Whitehorse

    Not much to report. Border crossing non- event with no one in line in front of us and few questions. Agent had us both come up together. Road some rain with strong winds but out of it just before campground. Stayed in the same one a third time so I didn’t have to learn a new code for bathroom.

    Bottom line after several weeks up here we are on sensory overload. Every turn another beautiful landscape or mountain. From Haines Junction to Whitehorse was a reverse of earlier ride and opposite direction gives new perspective for even more overload.


    A couple pictures.

    DSCF0361.JPG
    DSCF0363.JPG
    DSCF0366.JPG
    wilsonjw42, jwc, wilfred and 2 others like this.
  5. Fuzzy74

    Fuzzy74 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2009
    Oddometer:
    826
    Location:
    Cumberland Plateau in Tennessee
    Day 26 -
    Whitehorse to Watson Lake

    Expected it to be a relatively short day. It took longer than going the other way on a Sunday when all the construction was shut down. Waited for pilot cars three times. One thing we both missed somehow in other direction was all the names and messages spelled out with rocks on the banks either side of the road. We did not stop to add one.

    Yukon is mowing the right of way on the road. It has apparently been years with the short growing season up here. Makes it easier to see wildlife beside the road.
    DSCF0372.JPG

    Nuke’s tire pressure light was on solid when we pulled into lunch stop. Checking pressure, found he was down to 15 psi on the rear. We found a spiral nail in the tire and Nuke plugged it. Apparently Gold Wing owners like to lay down on the job as there is so little access to the rear tire. I thought he was going to plug his tire, but Nuke was definitely laying down on the job.
    IMG_0597.JPG

    While Nuke was plugging his tire I noticed a familiar Nighthawk in the parking lot. I met the owner Joris van O the winner of the games at Dust 2 Dawson. His control of bike was awesome to watch at the competition. He had previously posted here having passed us on the way to Moriane Lake near Lake Louise. While we were road around paved roads in Alaska he road his Nighthaw with street tires to Tuk. He is traveling on his Nighthawk (I think 1993) and is headed to South America. I asked him where he lives and he pointed to his bike.

    Joris and his ride.
    IMG_0596.JPG
    In Watson Lake we again stayed at the Air Force Lodge. Such a nice place and we again enjoyed visiting with Mike.

    Nuke realized he was not going to make it home before his tires are worn out. We made arrangements for new tires and oil changes on both bikes in Prince George. It will be a bit early for me, but mine won’t make it all the way home and getting them at same time will save another half day a week later. Plus the tires and labor are much less this side of the border.
    johnwesley, Moosietoo, jwc and 5 others like this.
  6. Fuzzy74

    Fuzzy74 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2009
    Oddometer:
    826
    Location:
    Cumberland Plateau in Tennessee
    Day 27 Watson Lake to Bell ll

    Headed west backtracking 12 miles to highway 37, the Cassier to Stewart Highway or just the Cassier Highway. We read on all the other Alaska threads about all the bear on the road. One said “more than I could count”. Based on our observation guess he couldn’t count past 4. Another said “so many I lost track”. If I can use my left hand to count and leave my throttle hand alone I don’t lose track. That said, one of the three posed for a pic.
    DSCF0397 (2).JPG

    The scenery was awesome and the road not near as rough as we had been led to believe. Yes it was chip seal for much of the road and yes chip seal means something different here than down south but no different than most of the chip seal we had seen in British Columbia and Yukon and half the route or more was smooth pavement between Watson Lake and Stewart.


    We had heard of the beautify scenery on the Cassier and started out wondering as all we had to see was a wall of trees either side of the road until about 30 miles south we crested a hill and saw:
    DSCF0412.JPG

    The scenery just continued to get better and better.


    We stopped in Dease Lake for gas. The gas station was also a grocery store and had some gas station food. I asked a fellow in line where to eat and he strongly suggested (backed up by next patron in line) that if we cluld last another hour wait until Tatogga Lake. We had pretty much given up on finding it when with stomachs growling louder than a Harley we saw a sign for the Tatogga Lake Resort. We had a great lunch. The waitress husband was working a gold mine near by so I assume he had not struck it rich yet.


    Originally we had thought of tent camping at Bell ll but an inmate reported they had closed tent camping and we booked a room. Tent camping was open and had not been closed, but the mosquitoes were thick and aggressive so we did not regret leaving our tents packed. The restraint was one of the best on the trip too. For 40 $C an appetizer, Salmon Dinner and desert. They even had a decent wine list which is important to me.

    All in all it was a great ride even with only 3 bear sightings. There was not one construction zone on the entire run from Alaskan Highway to Yellowhead Highway. It was loaded with scenery and I understand why so many recommend going north on the Cassier vs Alaskan highway through B.C.

    A few more pics
    DSCF0365.JPG
    DSCF0379.JPG
    DSCF0389.JPG
    jwc, wilfred, Amphib and 1 other person like this.
  7. nuke65

    nuke65 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2019
    Oddometer:
    69
    Location:
    Georgia
    A2A - Part 14, Tunnel Vision and a Three-Hour Tour

    After a lovely night of constant airplane noise from the nearby airport and ambulance sirens from the nearby hospital, Fuzzy and I left for Whittier, AK. Our objective: to ride through the Whittier Tunnel and then take the ferry to Valdez.

    The plan was simple enough. Ride about 60 miles to the tunnel. Ride through the tunnel, then get tickets for the ferry to Valdez. This would save us many miles of backtracking to Tok, AK and give us our fourth different border crossing. The day was overcast but the views were still spectacular. The ride to the tunnel was short. The wait a bit longer. We paid our $13 fee, and then got the “briefing”. The tunnel is the second longest tunnel in the United States. Two and a half miles. It was cut through rock during World War II and is only big enough for one-way traffic. Unless the train is in it, then no one can fit. The ride is simple enough. Motorcycles are sent through last, after a brief delay to try to exhaust the fumes out of the tunnel. It is not good for publicity if motorcycle riders get sick while still in their helmets.

    Once you enter the tunnel, all you have to do is aim for the area between the railroad tracks. Seems hitting the railroad tracks also may be a bad day for publicity. So we waited in our designated area until directed to go and go we did. I didn’t know that I could hold my breath for over 6 minutes. Turns out it is quite simple to do given the right motivation. Such as not crashing and getting your name in the paper. It was also a surprise to feel a sudden sideways wind at the beginning and end of the tunnel from huge fans helping to purge toxic fumes away from us poor motorcycle riders. The nice gesture, however, was lost on us as we focused on not being pushed onto a railroad tie. And yes, in this ride the light at the end of the tunnel was not a train.

    We went to the port transit authority to purchase our ferry tickets to be told we were on standby. I was so tempted to ask the attendant if she could hold her breath for 6 minutes. I’m sure if I had, she would have taken pity on me and given me a regular ticket. But I didn’t speak up because we figured that they surely could fit two motorcycles in between some huge RVs. That gave us time to eat lunch and then wait in line until everyone else had boarded.

    Then came the go ahead signal to proceed to the ticket agent right by the ramp. We rode up to deliver our standby tickets and receive the briefing. Ride onto the ramp, ride slow onto the ferry. So off I went. Headed to a large hump at the beginning of the ramp. About the time I thought that the mother of all speed bumps may be a problem, I felt and heard the bottom of my motorcycle grinding on top of the ramp. But it didn’t knock me down and I had just enough time to realize that there were two narrow boarding ramps and I had to steer my bike onto. On a wet, slippery metal ramp. Good thing I remembered to go slow cause if I missed, that would also not be a good publicity day. I made it onto the ferry and a worker was directing me to a particular spot between two RVs. All I had to do was navigate through two hemispherical tie-downs mounted in the floor. The front tire missed just as I planned. The rear tire, however, didn’t quite play along. Again, going slow, my rear tire caught the tie-down and, well, did I mention that the bike weighs about 1200 lbs with me and my gear on it? It isn’t very easy to hold a bike up that has decided it wants to fall down. So I dropped it. Fortunately, I missed the RVs and my foot, leaving us to pick it up and try again. Eventually, we got it tied down for the journey to Valdez.

    The ferry ride was definitely worth it. A six-hour tour. My thoughts went to the SS Minnow but I knew we would not suffer the same fate because I didn’t see either Mary Anne or Ginger on board. Though it was cloudy, the views were still marvelous.

    We spent the night in Valdez and the next day journeyed back to Tok. Then came the trip from Tok to Watson Lake as we started working our way back south. I notice as we left that my tire pressure monitoring system was indicating a low tire pressure. Figuring it was the cold tire, we pressed on for about 100 miles to the next stop. However, the tire pressure monitoring system never turned off. So I checked my tires and found the rear tire about 15 lbs low. Time to look for a leak, and I found it. A spiral nail decided to leap up from the ground and try to hitchhike on my tire to escape Canada. Time for the tire plugging kit. It only took two tries, but we finally got the tire plugged and it held air pressure the remaining 100+ miles over many stretches of gravel to Watson Lake. Hopefully, it won’t be flat in the morning.

    The next day, I checked the tire and added a few pounds of air. Seems to be holding alright. Then we left for the Bell 2 Lodge on the way to Hyder, AK. The weather turned clear giving us the now spectacular views that seem so common place. We had heard stories of the roads made of “chip seal” that were so sharp, tires were known to be shredded after the run. We found the roads in good shape, with the roughness no different than many roads in Canada and Alaska. Much less gravel on this trek. Not much on this leg of travel. None of the route is covered by cell phone and few facilities have satellite internet access. (Translation, it is slow.) Tomorrow is Hyder, AK and the last of the border crossings from Canada to Alaska.



    Vandergraf, wilsonjw42, jwc and 5 others like this.
  8. nuke65

    nuke65 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2019
    Oddometer:
    69
    Location:
    Georgia
    You were taking so long in the restaurant that I was napping in the shade.
    Vandergraf and bobw like this.
  9. misterk

    misterk Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    May 30, 2008
    Oddometer:
    824
    Location:
    DFW Texas
    great report guys, thanks
    nuke65 likes this.
  10. Ol Man

    Ol Man Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,409
    Location:
    Apple Valley, Calif
    Have been enjoying your report. Riding to Alaska is a great adventure.

    Like a lot of others, I have been reading each of the Alaska rides and no one has talked about going down to Telegraph Creek out of Dease Lake. I am curious how the town fared after the fire last year. We were there when the River Song opened for the season and enjoyed coffee and a cinnamon roll. This is just a general question for other riders who have been there and may answer.
    wilsonjw42 and Ken in Regina like this.
  11. Fuzzy74

    Fuzzy74 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2009
    Oddometer:
    826
    Location:
    Cumberland Plateau in Tennessee
    We didn’t take the detour as we understand it to gravel road. I’d have had to leave Nuke behind. Ask question on Alaska 2019 thread with many more current Alaska riders there.
  12. fasteddiecopeman

    fasteddiecopeman Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2008
    Oddometer:
    227
    I agree w/ your conclusions - ALL of it IS awesome!
    nuke65 likes this.
  13. Ken in Regina

    Ken in Regina Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2010
    Oddometer:
    2,657
    Location:
    Regina, SK, Canada
    For future reference, it's likely not any worse, and probably easier, than what he described for Top of the World.

    ...ken...
    nuke65 likes this.
  14. vhntr1

    vhntr1 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2017
    Oddometer:
    161
    Fantastic report well done on my bucket list for 2021.
    nuke65 likes this.
  15. rtcoker

    rtcoker Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 20, 2015
    Oddometer:
    86
    Location:
    Smokies
    Guys, both of you. Fantastic pics and ride reports. You have both made me jealous and inspired me to get going. Safe travels continuing home.
    nuke65 likes this.
  16. Fuzzy74

    Fuzzy74 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2009
    Oddometer:
    826
    Location:
    Cumberland Plateau in Tennessee
    Day 28 – Bell ll to Hyder, AK to Smithers, B.C.

    After a great nights sleep in Bell ll we were back on the road south. Scenery continued to keep us open mouthed in awe. The road is known locally as the Stewart - Cassier highway, so when there is a choice to continue south, going straight takes one onto 37A towards Stewart, B. C., not south towards Yellowhead Highway and Prince George. This 65 kilometer stretch of road is not to be missed. It is known as the glacier highway with many glaciers and one really impressive glacier coming right down to the lake the road follows. Reportedly this one glows in the dark, but we didn’t want to wait around a month or two to find out for ourselves.
    DSCF0451.JPG

    We did see one more bear making a total of 4 on Stewart – Cassier highway. A fifth crossed road in front of Nuke after Stewart riding towards Hyder. (Still counting on one hand since Watson Lake.)


    We did find the road to Hyder.
    2ACB4712-FCF5-4CA4-B628-15EA9BA4F597.jpeg

    Stewart is a small town adjacent to Hyder, AK. Hyder makes Stewart look BIG. Crossing into Hyder there is no customs or immigration check. It is at the end of the road and to leave without going back to Canada requires a float plane. A plane does show up twice a week with U.S. mail for the 55 year round residents augmented by another 50 or so with summer homes there. I stopped in General Store to check on road conditions to Salmon Glacier. Turns out the owner is also mayor. He told me about a time 10 years ago when Canada started closing the border at night. He was on TV multiple times explaining the hardship this placed on the few residents of Hyder. It is now open around the clock but I not staffed midnight. One needing to get in Alaska picks up a phone to call an agent elsewhere and hold their passport up to the camera. To get cell service in Hyder requires going to the boat dock for line of sight to the tower in Stewart. The store also serves as the UPS location. The post office will carry UPS packages but not hold them There was a stack of Amazon prime boxes on the floor waiting for individuals to come pick them up. Amazon is much less costly than walking to Stewart for most shopping. Just don’t expect 2 day delivery from a twice weekly float plane.


    Mayor told me the road to glacier was in great shape. Warned me to watch out for bears as they were frequently going to river to see if salmon had arrived yet. (They hadn’t.) First 4 miles was paved with bear scat everywhere. If someone wanted to shovel it off the road their extended length pickup would need a large trailer too to hold it all. I did dodge one black bear heading for the river. I stopped for a bio break at a rest stop just prior to pavement end and saw a couple of loaded up motorcycles in parking lot. Talked with riders a bit as well as a couple who had just come down from the glacier having camped overnight. They said it was socked in with fog and the ride down was difficult with extremely poor visibility. I decided to ride the road anyway until I climbed enough to enter the fog hoping it would lift before I got there.

    Going back to my bike I noticed Louisiana license plates on the other 2 bikes and the lightbulb lit up as to who I had been talking too. It was Bill and Ted. I have been following their report here “Meandering North to Alaska” I went back, and we talked some more comparing notes. We had been a day apart at many points on the trip.

    Just after the stop the road turned to gravel. It was the worst washboard I had ever ridden on my bike. No more jaw open from the awesome scenery, I made sure I kept it tight so no fillings would fall out. Ted later in the day drove over her Madstad windshield after the washboard shook it off. (Read details and outcome in “Meandering to Alaska” report.) A few miles of gravel and I again crossed the border into B.C. making a total of 6 locations to do so this trip. Border agent must have been on his bio break as I didn’t see one and sped through anyway, pausing just long enough to take a picture to document the event.
    DSCF0441.JPG

    Road continued to climb. Passed a working gold mine across the river. It has been shut down and reopened with new ownership multiple times. Current owner has moved from open pit to underground mining. Hyder should figure out how to collect duties on the gold as to get it from the B. C gold mines to anywhere else in Canada it has to go through Hyder first.
    DSCF0444.JPG

    At one point it looked like a slide had covered the road and a path had been plowed through. For some reason Nuke decided to tour Stewart with his Goldwing and not come up here with me?
    DSCF0440.JPG

    I made it to the glacier viewing point up top. View turned out to not be all that special and did not take advantage of the bench to stay awhile.
    E7415972-699F-4B96-997B-103F65441154.jpeg

    Road back down did not have the washboard, but I kept an eye out for any parts that might have fallen off on the way up. (Ted came up later so didn’t see any of her windshield parts).


    Coming back down half a dozen pickups were climbing the hill at 45+mph with massive dust clouds behind and no slowing down to pass me. Must have been late to work at mines further up the road. At one interesting spot there was a fast moving stream coming down the mountain and under the road. They had built a concrete spillway over the road for when the 6’ culvert can’t handle the flow. This was the only paved section for the 15-mile climb. I ad to wait for another bear to cross the road on my descent.
    DSCF0447.JPG
    DSCF0442.JPG

    Getting back to Stewart the Canadian border official was great. She was asking about the trip and plans as usual and then stopped me asking “Where is the rest of we”. I laughed and told here the other half was the red Goldwing that passed earlier because he didn’t want to see the glacier. She was surprised he didn’t go until I reminded her is was a Goldwing.


    Just after sitting down for lunch Bill and Ted walked in. We enjoyed a long lunch together talking rides and bikes mostly. Great making new friends on a trip like this and hope I run into them again somewhere. On the street another inmate stopped me asking if we were the ones on ADV. He had been reading our thread and lives in Smithers, B.C. He advised us to go further than planned to stay at the riverside campground in Smithers which was great advice.


    Ride back over Glacier Highway was just as good the second time.

    https://www.facebook.com/rick.wilson.165033/videos/2553915111285808/


    Just prior to 37 ending at hwy 16 I saw this steeple on the left and detoured for a pic. There was an old Anglican Church with this second, apparently older, steeple out front by itself. Church no longer in use and nothing there for explanation so just sharing the interesting picture.
    DSCF0454.JPG

    We arrived at the Riverside Campground in Smithers, found an empty spot and with rain threatening started to get tents off bikes. The campground host was just returning and stopped to talk. She told us rain was coming and to set up our tents in a picnic shelter where we would be out of the rain as well as have electricity and running water. What a great setup and wonderful host. She told us she tried to get another biker to do it the night before and he turned her down only to wake her up in middle of storm at 3 am wanting her to open gate so he could leave with the storm having chased him out of his tent. We slept well during the rain that night.
    1586AA20-E3B5-4B5C-9C66-E8C137537DAD.jpeg
  17. Fuzzy74

    Fuzzy74 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2009
    Oddometer:
    826
    Location:
    Cumberland Plateau in Tennessee
    For Nuke "likely not any worse" is probably not an endorsement of a road that he wants to tackle on his current ride. Our bikes are at opposite extremes which requires some compromise. Not many I would want to do this ride with and I am glad I'm experiencing it with Nuke and for as long as he could be gone from home, 670 cc.
    nuke65, wilfred and Ken in Regina like this.
  18. rtcoker

    rtcoker Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 20, 2015
    Oddometer:
    86
    Location:
    Smokies
  19. Fuzzy74

    Fuzzy74 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2009
    Oddometer:
    826
    Location:
    Cumberland Plateau in Tennessee
    Day 29 - Smithers to Prince George

    Bad things happen in threes, so after a bruise on one incident and near miss on another, I was glad to pull into Prince George without experiencing the third.

    No pictures taken today. We only had 230 miles to cover so took our time leaving campground. As stated it is a great place to stay in Smithers. It is a long weekend as tomorrow, Monday, is Canada Day, when Canadians celebrate their independence from Great Britain. Road was good with light traffic and we made good time.

    We stopped in Fraser Lake to find some lunch. The first 2 places we stopped were closed for the holiday weekend. Looking for a third listed on our GPS I was slowly moving through a parking lot behind parked cars when one started backing out towards me. I stopped and yelled. She stopped but not before contact pushed me down. She did not hit me she just pushed lightly with a 3000 pound machine sending me to the ground. Not a scratch on her car. Luckily she stopped with out running over my bike. I rolled on the ground and was fine. My mirror had moved and my highway peg rotated on the crash bar. The mount is bent slightly but will be easily fixed. The driver was far more upset than me so I did my best to calm her down and convince her I and my ride were fine. Nuke thought she had a low tire so I got a gage off my bike and checked it for her. I gave her a hug to reassure her all was OK and we went on our way. The fourth restraint we tried was open and we had lunch. After lunch I straightened mirror and moved the highway peg. The arm is slightly bent but ok to ride and easily fixed when I get home. This evening I feel a light bruise on my right calf and realize it was the contact point with her bumper that resulted in me being pushed over. Not a bad bruise but I can feel it.

    About 25 miles short of Prince George I had an opportunity to test my antilock brakes. THEY DO WORK. It is beyond me why people think that in a changing emergency situation they can modulate brakes at the edge of losing traction better than a good antilock system. A black bear appeared on the shoulder close in front of me and started running across road. I was able to slow down enough to miss him closely, but had he stopped in middle of lane there would have been contact. There was plenty of traffic in both directions but luckily, he made it across safely. This was two events for me today and as they come in threes I was glad to get off bike at hotel in Prince George.

    Tomorrow is a down day with no plans as we have new tires and oil changes scheduled first thing Tuesday morning. Perhaps we can participate in some Canada Day events.

    After our service Tuesday Nuke and I will split up for a few days. I hope to visit friends in Penticton and have plans to see a former partner / friend in Coeur d’Alene. Nuke will be visiting relatives in Seattle and see a friend in Spokane. We will be back together at the end of the week to head for Beartooth Pass and some other great roads as we meander home.

    A down day tomorrow will be good rest. Part of me is tired and ready to be home but another part is sad it will end for now in a couple weeks. I have ridden 7,800 miles on trip with around 3,000 to go. Nuke has ridden more and has more left.
    Cigar, jwc, bobw and 4 others like this.
  20. Fuzzy74

    Fuzzy74 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2009
    Oddometer:
    826
    Location:
    Cumberland Plateau in Tennessee
    That is one I climbed gravel road to see but was fogged in. Bill and Ted went up after lunch and posted some great pics on their thread.

    My pic is one on 37A about 1/3 way from 37 to Stewart.
    jwc likes this.