Tie down points for trailering?

Discussion in 'GS Boxers' started by Voyageur, May 8, 2005.

  1. Voyageur

    Voyageur 1995 R1100GS

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    I would appreciate opinions on the best place to attach the GS end of my trailer, tie-down, ratchet straps. Do I need two sets (front and rear)? Front end will be secured by a commercial wheel chock. Thank you for any advice . . .

    I know - I know ride it - don't trailer it :rofl

    Voyageur
    #1
  2. Voyageur

    Voyageur 1995 R1100GS

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    Not even one little teeny meeny hint. Oh well . . .


    Voyageur
    #2
  3. Wanderlust

    Wanderlust Just another spoke.....

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    Why would you want to trailer your bike? Did you total it so bad you can't ride it home?
    #3
  4. Voyageur

    Voyageur 1995 R1100GS

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    I already coverd that in the first post :D No- did not total it. I want to tow it behind our Roadtrek RV and I can't drive both, at the same time . . . also I don't want to damage the bike by using imprope tie-down points. Oh yes- I also don't want it to fall off the trailer . . .


    Thanks, Voyageur
    #4
  5. dyvking

    dyvking ahead of his flamin star

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    The back end will dance around if you don't secure it. I use forward ties from the forks as well, using soft ties around the forks. Just tight enough to help balance and take some of the torque from the chock off the wheel. Then a tie from each side of the rear frame down and back. Again, not over-tightened, so that the bike's suspension can do it's job to protect it from jolts. Soft ties here also.

    Better safe than sorry.
    #5
  6. Voyageur

    Voyageur 1995 R1100GS

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    A Big Thank You Walt. I will do exactly as you suggest. My GS thanks you too.

    Voyager
    #6
  7. Jack90210

    Jack90210 quia ego nominor leo

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    If you have crash bars, those are a convenient place to anchor the front. The soft-ties sound like a great idea too.

    After you cinch down the bike, bounce hard on the rear with most of your weight. The bike should push down, but the tie-downs shouldn't slacken to the point where they can pop off (first hard bump and exactly that will probably happen). It's harder to tell with the front by bouncing (on a BMW anyway, in my experience) because of the suspension geometry ... just leave some suspension left as described above.
    #7
  8. Voyageur

    Voyageur 1995 R1100GS

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    Thanks Jack. Yep. I do have HB engine protection bars. When they shipped my GS from California they used two short nylon straps with loops at both ends. The shorties were attached to the bike and the ratchet hooked to them. No metal in contact with the bike. I did save those two straps and I will use them as you suggest. Thank you.

    Voyageur
    #8
  9. Stonewall

    Stonewall The Wild

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    This way is the way to go, I have hauled both my GS and my R1100RSL, which has all the lower farings. You don't actually need a front tire chalk, two straps foward and two straps back. Spend the bucks and buy the tie downs that have the loops built in or by the loops, 1in tubular nylon rated at 1500 lbs, this keeps any metal from touching your bike. By useing the forks you will not compress the suspension at all.

    Stonewall
    #9
  10. Jay Lawson

    Jay Lawson Convert Reprobate

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    I can tell you how NOT to tie the bike down! A buddy and I were hauling our new bikes from Michigan to Tennessee in the dead of winter in a big enclosed trailer. I attached "motorcycle tie-downs" to the handle bars, then to the floor of the trailer. I didn't want the strap to rub on the tank, so I put the hooks on the grips of the bars. My buddy took the trailer home the night before our departure, and when he got home he called to tell me that my bike had fallen over into his!! The handle bars had worked loose and slammed backwards into the tank. I was pissed, thinking that the bars had not been torqued properly during the dealer set up - after all this bike was new. I ended up with a nice dent just north of the filler cap. Couldn't stand that on a new bike, so I replaced the tank - lesson learned. Anyone interested in an '01 black tank with a ding in the top?
    #10
  11. bilkar

    bilkar Adventurer

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    i found this pdf file somewhere a few years back :deal
    and used it for tie-down instructions while in the back of the truck.
    (they are on a trailer - but same principles apply...)

    http://www.secondwindbmw.com/PDFs/generaltiedown.pdf

    it has worked for me both times i moved cross country
    and had to haul all my OTHER crap in a trailer,
    once through some pretty good snow and the other in good wind.


    i got some nylon straping from REI and ratchets from target.
    #11
  12. Yellow Pig

    Yellow Pig Allergic to asphalt! Supporter

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    I can tell you what not to do. Dont hook your tie downs to the handlebars like you would for a normal dirt bike. The GS is too heavy and can rotate the dandlebard down untill they gouge your tank. Don't ask how I know this.
    The best way is off the front forks w/ soft straps and then off the passenger footpeg brackets in the back.
    #12
  13. Pugnacious

    Pugnacious Life is good at 4,200'

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    The link you supplied says it all. Thanks!

    I would have tied mine down like I have every other motorcycle for the past 40 years. I have never had an occasion to tie down and trailer any of my past or present oil heads. Thanks again for supplying an authoritative source.
    #13
  14. MGB

    MGB ex. BmwDuc

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    after a final drive failure in Tennessee.

    I put the rubber coates hooks over the bar near the grips. Out to the corner of the truck (and trailer it was later hauled on for the last leg of the trip. I did put two tie downs on each side in case anything broke/came loose. Front suspension slightly compressed.

    Also put a tie down from the leading edge of the front tire to each side so the front wheel could not rotate.

    NO tie downs on the rear.

    Rode great for over 400 miles in the Budget rental truck and the last 200 in my utility trailer, all at 65-70 miles an hour over mixed road surfaces and some local bumpy backroads.
    #14
  15. KillerPriller

    KillerPriller Long timer

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    Yep, using the bars is not a good idea. The strenght of the bar mounts is insufficient for the weight of the bike.

    Better to soft strap the forks at the cross brace. You can then add redundancy at the handle bars, but dont use them as primary anchor points.

    use crash bars and rear foot peg rails on subframe to maintain bike allignment.

    set up all straps so they pull bike forward, into the tire chock. never backwards. I know there is debate on this, but if one strap goes, my feeling is that i would rather have others pushing it into position instead of pulling it out or over.



    Also, if your pulling it behind an RV, expect rock chips. Dont put a bike cover on 'cuz it will only flap against the bike and cause more damange.

    The only real solution to this problem is called a tent. Put a tent on your frikkin bike and leave the RV at HOME!!! Its called Adventure Riding for a reason man!!!

    nk
    #15
  16. SkidinNC

    SkidinNC Been here awhile

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    Does anyone have a new link for this pdf file? It doesn't work anymore.
    #16
  17. Osprey70

    Osprey70 Adventurer

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    Hi there,
    old thread, but does any one have the PDF referred to with diagrams on how (where) to tie down a GS?
    I would be grateful for anyone posting it.
    Thanks, Simon
    #17
  18. Callisto224

    Callisto224 Long timer Supporter

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    Pretty sure your owners manual has instructions for how to tie down the bike.
    #18
  19. LaurelPerryOnLand

    LaurelPerryOnLand Long timer

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  20. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

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