Timmer's 2018 BOM1000 Ride

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Day Trippin'' started by Timmer, Aug 8, 2018.

  1. Timmer

    Timmer Curious Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,281
    Location:
    Burien, WA
    BACKGROUND

    This ride report is dedicated to my friend, Ron Haraseth, architect of the most recent Best of Montana 1000 (BOM1000) rides. Ron left us all too early this spring, 2018 but his ride legacy lives on.

    Last year after completion of the BOM1000, Ron announced that he would not be planning a 2018 ride. As the originator of the BOM1000 series, I agreed to step up and plan a 2018 ride. Little did I know it would be a ride that would honor Ron. Last summer (2017), I was on another camping trip and we passed through Stevensville, Montana where it turned out that we had a last meal together at a favorite BBQ joint of mine located in Stevensville.

    Over the winter, I decided that we would repeat the 2017 route that Ron created, but with a twist: I'd reverse the route and shave 3 days off of it so we could complete the ride within a 7 day span to help those who were still working be able to get minimal time off.

    So the ride would start in Stevensville and have the following route plan:

    Route Summary:

    Day 1 - Sat 7/28 - Stevensville to Whitehouse Campground - 144 miles
    Day 2 - Sun 7/29 - Whitehouse Campground to Big Timber - 188 miles
    Day 3 - Mon 7/30 - Big Timber to Cody - 198 Miles (lots of pavement & over Beartooth Pass & Chief Joseph Highway)
    Day 4 - Tue 7/31 - Cody to Big Springs Campground - 215 miles (through Yellowstone)
    Day 5 - Wed 8/1 - Big Springs Campground to Elkhorn Hot Springs - 220 Miles
    Day 6 - Thu 8/2 - Elkhorn Hot Springs to Stevensville - 178 miles

    Blackboots, a previous BOM1000 rider, created a memorial ride sticker for us and I affixed mine to my bike.

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    I'm riding a WR250R and since the start point is some 600 miles from my home in the Puget Sound basin, I broke the ride into 2 days of riding. So let's get started.

    Day 1 - July 26, 2018 - Seattle to Colfax, WA

    Normally I don't like to get up early, but because of the projected heat in Eastern Washington, I got up early (for me since I'm retired) and left my house around 7am.

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    I debated with myself about whether to take the Snoqualmie Pass Highway (I-90) or go over Chinook Pass and Yakima. As I headed north on I-405, traffic signage indicated a major blockage north of me, and by the time I reached the Maple Valley Highway exit, traffic was severely congested. So I exited and took the Maple Valley Highway to WA18 thinking I would escape the traffic. Once I was on WA18 headed for I-90, traffic came to a total halt and inched along for 6 more miles. Additionally, the Issaquah exit was closed by the county sheriff forcing all the traffic to stay on WA18. Those 6 miles took over an hour!

    Once I was on I-90, traffic moved right along and the breeze kept me cool. The WR hums right along at 60-65 and soon I was cruising by Lake Keechelus.

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    I grabbed a quick breakfast meal in Ellensburg.

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    With the recent fires along I-90, I elected to ride down the old highway to Vantage via the Ginkgo Petrified Forest. It's a nice 50mph putt and the ride across the Vantage Bridge over the Columbia River was pretty smooth. It was, however, getting a bit warm. I re-fueled in Othello (I have a 4.1 gallon tank) and rode on to outside of Colfax where my relatives live on a farm. They weren't home, but I pitched my hammock and waited for them to return home. It was a tad bit warm in the shade.

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    Soon they returned and I took them out for a nice Mexican dinner and retired to my hammock for a nice slumber that was interrupted around midnight by the coyotes howling not far away. Fortunately, there were no bears nearby!

    Stay tuned for more . . .
    #1
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  2. StayFrosty

    StayFrosty Mid Life Crisis -Wish it happened 20 yrs ago Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2017
    Oddometer:
    69
    Location:
    Spokane WA
    Thanks for sharing the memorial ride
    #2
  3. Timmer

    Timmer Curious Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,281
    Location:
    Burien, WA
    Day 2 - July 26 - Colfax, WA to Stevensville, MT

    It was projected to continue being warm, so I got up early, packed up, ate breakfast with my B-In-L, and headed out to rendezvous with friends who are "vacationing" down on the Snake River at the nearby Boyer Park. We enjoyed some good conversation before I had to continue riding.

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    Since I was near the Lower Granite Dam, I rode up to the base for a photo opportunity.

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    It's a nice twisty road down to Boyer Park and it was just as twisty riding up it! I decided to skip riding WA195, and rode back down the next road to the Snake River using the Wawai grade.

    At the top of the grade was a photogenic car that just needs a little work to be road worthy. Who knows how many times it rolled? The left grill appeared to be the only salvageable piece left!

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    I rode along the Snake River for 18 or so miles towards Lewiston and caught up with this cool river cruise boat (in one of my other lives, I'm an avid cruiser).

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    The rest of the ride to Lewiston looked a lot like this.

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    I refueled in Lewiston and pondered riding the Spiral Highway, but decided to save that for the return trip.

    The next segment was a ride up the Clearwater River and it was cool riding alongside it. There was little traffic and I putted right along with views like this.

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    At Orofino, ID, I exited and rode up to another dam (Dworshak) for a photo (yes, I have an unbridled fetish for dams as you'll see throughout this ride report).

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    At Kooskia, ID, I refueled again since it's about 120 miles over Lolo Pass before the next fuel (except for the expensive fuel at the resort near the top of the pass). I also ate some lunch and watered myself down as it was very hot and expected to continue until I gained some altitude. The water in the pitcher, I poured down my Kilimanjaro jacket to serve as an evaporative cooler. The dark colored drink was a chocolate milkshake. The cheeseburger was terrific as was the clam chowder.

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    Leaving Kooskia, I soon reached the sign that all motorcyclists love to see and I've seen this one many times.

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    There's a matching sign at the other end of the 99 miles, but I didn't bother to photograph it.

    I knew there was construction ahead (repaving) and some bridge repairs and I wasn't disappointed.
    Along the way I saw a collection of old trucks and made a mental note to stop and photograph them in more detail on my return trip.
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    Here's the first bridge repair which has single lane traffic guided by an electronic radar controlled set of stop lights.

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    At the first stop for the repaving project, the guard motioned me to come to the front of the line and we chatted a bit. He gave me permission to photograph him.

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    We had to follow a pilot car, but once that pickup pulled over, the road was mine until the next stop.

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    At the summit, here's one of my favorite signs in the world. I wanted to leave my sticker, but I restrained myself.

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    While the speed limit on most of Lolo Pass on the Idaho side is 50mph, on the Montana side it jumps to 70mph. So I scooted down US12 to Lolo, MT and then to Stevensville, MT where I had made arrangements to meet with Ron's widow, Judy. I arrived around 6:30pm and we had a good visit. She offered me an opportunity to sleep in their motorhome which I graciously accepted. But I needed some dinner and geared up to leave. As I was riding out, the bike felt funny and I discovered that my front tire was flat. So I turned around and rode back to Judy's where it was easier to repair it. It turned out that I had a pinch flat with 3 holes and I couldn't seal them after many tries, so I elected to install my spare tube. By that time it was dark, so I missed dinner but had some snacks from the bike and I enjoyed a last night's sleep in the motorhome.

    And so ended day two of my ride to the start of the BOM1000 which would start in the morning at a local service station.

    Dreamland came easy with dreams of a good ride ahead. Stay tuned for more.
    #3
  4. sasho

    sasho Dual Personality

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,875
    Location:
    MT/Bulgaria
    :lurk
    #4
  5. Timmer

    Timmer Curious Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,281
    Location:
    Burien, WA
    BOM1000 Day 1 - Saturday, 7/28 - Stevensville, MT, to Whitehouse Campground - 144 miles

    The schedule for today was to meet at the Conoco station in Stevensville with a helmet time of 8:30am. For these rides I never know who actually is going to show up, so one has to roll with the punches. We had a good group of riders and one local show up. After a quick rider's meeting, I explained that this is not a race, but a chance to ride some very beautiful country on a route in honor of Ron who planned it. We were riding it backwards not unlike the symbolism of putting boots backwards in the stirrups to honor a deceased military or official person. Also, Judy had made a request that those riders who would like to sign Ron's picture, she would like them to come by the house and do so. Most elected to do that. As I had signed the picture the night before, HairlipDog led the riders to her house to sign the picture while I headed down the route to Hamilton to pick up a replacement spare front inner tube at the local Yamaha dealer. Here's a few pictures from the start:

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    Stephanie and Eric (BOM1000 virgins, but they proved their worth riding two up!!)

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    After purchased the tube, I rejoined the route just as the main body of riders were passing by. We headed up the Skalkaho Highway and suddenly riders were pointing to the left, but they kept riding. I approached the scene and there was a herd of mountain sheep which I was able to photograph.

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    At Skalkaho Falls most of us took a break. This is a very beautiful set of waterfalls that's been a part of many BOM1000 rides.

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    It was really cool to see Big Dog on the ride. I wasn't sure he would make it. I'm really glad he did as we had some good conversation.

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    That's Big Dog on the right with the baseball cap talking with Rob from Alberta (who would become my riding partner for the rest of the trip).

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    There were many scenes like this one.
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    Or this:
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    We continued up the pass and I found another of my favorite road signs. Only in Montana would one find numbered highway signs for a nice dirt road!

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    We went down the pass and then along Georgetown Lake into Anaconda.

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    The iconic symbol of Anaconda. All that remains of the smelter.
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    And then there are the placards documenting the wealth of bygone years.

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    After Anaconda and a brief Subway lunch stop and re-fueling, I motored on and soon hit gravel which would be present most of the rest of the way into the Whitehouse Camp.
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    I also started to see old structures which I like to photograph. Here's one of the first ones I saw.

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    Closeup of somebody's dreams . . .
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    More scenery

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    After a nice ride through the forest, we found camp.
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    This is one I've stayed at before and I was able to hang my hammock in the same trees.
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    Big Dog pitched his tent near me and we all occupied most of the space near the little creek.

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    Most of us arrived quite early, so there was a lot of chewing the fat and telling lies and recounting tales of various BOM1000's.
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    We even had entertainment in the form of an inchworm:
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    While it was quite warm in camp this first afternoon, would it keep it up? Stay tuned for Day 2 of the ride.
    #5
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  6. Captain Salmon

    Captain Salmon Honda Africa Twin

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2016
    Oddometer:
    205
    Location:
    Poulsbo Yacht Club, Washington
    Timmer, you are the man, riding that 250 all the way from Seattle!!
    #6
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  7. Timmer

    Timmer Curious Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,281
    Location:
    Burien, WA
    Thanks, I’ve ridden it twice and trailered twice. My Wing or ST1100 would be much more comfortable!
    #7
  8. Timmer

    Timmer Curious Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,281
    Location:
    Burien, WA
    BOM1000 Day 2 - Sunday, 7/28 - Whitehouse Campground to Big Timber - 188 miles

    At 35 degrees fahrenheit, it got really cold overnight at our 6,000 foot elevation. In the hammock it was especially cold even wrapped up in an emergency space blanket. But once I exited the hammock at 6am and began moving, I generated some heat. Since there was a cool restaurant in Boulder just 20 minutes or so away, I elected to pack up and with my new found riding partner, Rob, we headed out to find it. Not far from camp I found my next old structure. Once again I contemplated the dreams that were represented by those who built the structure.

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    Contrary to my normal custom, I didn't take any photos of breakfast or those of us who stopped to eat at the Boulder Cafe, but it was yummy and warm. We also refueled and headed off out of town down this long vallley. After leaving the pavement, the "road" for the next 20-30 miles was two track through the sage brush.

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    At times it was a bit rutty, but nothing the WR couldn't handle. It also helped that I'd ridden this section before.

    And, of course, there was another abandoned structure to photograph.

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    As we left the grassy plains, there was this gazebo in a very strange location. While the house in the background looks close, it's really not.

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    In the little town, we refueled and Ned in his sidecar rig caught up with us and his dog modeled his Doggles. The dog was quite content to wear them and I found them quite stylish.

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    As we motored on, even with the tarmac, the scenery is quite beautiful.

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    Here's the sidecar rig behind me in one of my few mirror shots.
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    As we crossed the Yellowstone River there was a tremendous law enforcement presence including boats, rafts, SUV's, a helicopter, food tents, and more. Later we learned that a sheriff's wife drowned and they were looking for another person.
    [​IMG] to be continued. . .
    #8
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  9. Timmer

    Timmer Curious Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,281
    Location:
    Burien, WA
    Day 2 - Continued

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    After passing by the incident, we took a little break before heading down the freeway a short distance to Livingston, MT where we left the freeway and headed up into the hills for another dirt section what was really nice. At the end of that section where it met the highway to Big Timber which was some 20 miles away, I came upon this.

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    Rod had dropped his little Honda (he thought it was in gear, but when he let the clutch out there was no forward movement, and over he went). I helped him lift the bike (no damage) and we motored on. I chose to ride on to camp while a number of riders elected to stop at a roadside bar for food.

    At camp, (Spring Creek Campground and Trout Ranch) I was greeted by a very friendly lady manning the check in counter. I got checked in and her husband guided me to the group tent area where I found a lovely place to hang my hammock. There were a couple of other riders already there. and soon many of the rest joined us.
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    I went in search of some diet pop, but ended up with a chocolate ice cream bar which I enjoyed while chatting with the campground host for about an hour who gave me some fish food in order to see how big the fish really were. I learned that earlier in the day a 6 year old boy caught a 10 1/2 and a 6 pound rainbow trout in the fishing pond. It was a great time of conversation about their adoption of 3 Chinese girls and many other topics. It was a chance to show that all bikers don't cause problems (one of our group sped through camp earlier in the day and that was not well received).
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    The fish were huge.
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    Later Big Dog came over and shot some video of the feeding frenzy.

    Back at my campsite it was time for dinner, so I tried one of my dried food meals. It was pretty tasty, and I ate both helpings.
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    The rest of the day was spent chatting with other riders and based upon the urging of the campground host, I made plans with Rob to go visit the Natural Bridge the next morning. How was that? Stay tuned for the next installment.
    #9
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  10. Timmer

    Timmer Curious Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,281
    Location:
    Burien, WA
    Day 3 - Mon 7/30 - Big Timber to Cody - 198 Miles plus 50 extra miles for a special stop

    Rob & I were awake at 6am and consulted each other about our desire to go see the Natural Bridge which was about 25 miles back along the highway MT298. We packed up and were the first to leave camp. We hoped that we could make a quick 1/2 hour ride to the Natural Bridge, visit it, and ride 1/2 hour back and not be too far behind the main group of riders.

    We got within 3 miles of the Natural Bridge when we encountered a slight delay! Some ranchers were moving a large herd of cattle.
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    It took almost an hour for the herd to clear the highway, but we took the opportunity to try to free up a sticking rear caliper on Rob's bike.
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    There was also some pretty nice scenery.

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    We arrived at the Natural Bridge and were totally enthralled with its beauty. Here's a brief description of it. Google it for more information.
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    Inlet
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    Outlet
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    More Info
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    Overflow path
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    Nearby scenery
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    There are more pictures of the area at my Smugmug site: https://timmer.smugmug.com/organize/Travel/2018/BOM1000/2018-07-30

    We then rode back to Big Timber, had some breakfast, and refueled before setting off on the next leg of today's trip which turned out to be a fabulous ride through a variety of gravel and pavement for some 90 miles and one 10 mile detour due to a bridge closure.

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    At this address, we found an old abandoned schoolhouse
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    There was also a marker for the historic Bozeman Trail. There's a similar marker for the Bannock Wagon Road on another part of a previous BOM1000. There's lots of history in this area.

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    There were lots of scenes like the following with the recurring haze in the air from wildfires.
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    We also saw lots of round bale haying operations throughout the ride like this one.
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    And then out in the middle of nowhere, an official and large address sign along with a paved driveway off of a gravel road.
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    Even water can be found just flowing out of a hill.
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    Then there's the Winnebago left to rust in a field.
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    Then there were the roads that looked like they were transplanted from the Gravellies. Can you spot the road in the far distance.
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    In a little community we found an antique tractor.

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    Back on pavement, we made our way to Red Lodge for some fuel and a quick bite to eat.
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    Here's a little residue from our earlier cattle encounter.
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    From Red Lodge, we made our way to Beartooth Pass which was a spectacular day for riding it.
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    After riding down the Beartooth Pass, we reached the Chief Joseph Scenic Byway which is one of my favorite roads in the Western US.
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    The High Bridge
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    Red Cliffs
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    Soon we reached our campsite at the Ponderosa Campground in Cody. Allie from the campground took me to the local Pizza Hut and WallyWorld for Pizza and liquid refreshments. Thanks to Blackboots for the liquid refreshments.
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    After dinner, most of us took showers and chatted about the day's ride. Although there was a lot of pavement today, Beartooth Pass and the Chief Joseph Scenic Byway are two worthy pavement rides in the area. We had a great time, and as night came, we all drifted off into dreamland. Stay tuned for tomorrow's plan. Would we see any wildlife? Would my photocopy of my Senior Pass work to get into Yellowstone National Park?
    #10
  11. Timmer

    Timmer Curious Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,281
    Location:
    Burien, WA
    Day 4 - Tue 7/31 - Cody to Big Springs Campground - 215 miles (through Yellowstone)

    Today's route was the big departure from the 2017 route. Instead of spending 3 days to go around Yellowstone National Park, the plan was to enter the park through the east gate and exit out the south gate. Those who wanted to spend time in the park could do so, but most of us would simply transit through the park.

    We broke camp and several of us ate a hearty breakfast at the hotel restaurant across the street before heading west to the east entrance of the park.

    Along the way Rob and I made a quick stop at the Buffalo Bill Dam.

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    There was much more scenery as we continued to ride the 50 miles to the East entrance of Yellowstone National Park.

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    We finally made it to the East Entrance.

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    I had forgotten my Senior National Parks Pass so my wife sent me photocopies of the pass, but the gate attendant wouldn't accept it. So I had to purchase a one year senior pass for $20. The other alternative was to pay $30 for a day pass.

    The ride through the park was pretty uneventful except for lots of traffic. There were no animal sightings and we stopped a few times for pictures and at Grant Village for a refueling stop plus lunch at the restaurant which was quite good. Here are a few pictures of the park transit.
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    Yellowstone Lake. It's really big!
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    Wildlife!
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    Clam Chowder for lunch
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    Our view
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    One of several crossings of the Continental Divide
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    Lewis Falls
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    After we exited the south exit of the park, we shortly turned west on the Ashton Flagg Ranch Road and quickly found ourselves back on gravel. A few miles further I encountered an earthen dam at Grassy Lake Reservoir.
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    It was then a lot of gravel and dirt riding west and north followed by a very long chip seal road through the national forest. On the dirt sections, I found it very surprising to see a fair number of passenger cars. Along the way we took a break and a few riders caught up with us. Here's Stephanie and Eric taking a break with us.
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    Arriving at Big Springs Campground, I set up my hammock and many of the riders sat around and swapped stories.
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    The water from the springs was crystal clear.
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    There's also an interpretive center at Johnny's Cabin.
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    Here's a photo of the little waterwheel building next to it.
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    Evening came and we enjoyed some campfire time. We even had a new rider to the group from Jerome, ID join us for the rest of the ride.

    Tomorrow would be another highlight section of riding for me as well as some unexpected challenges. Stay tuned.
    #11
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  12. Timmer

    Timmer Curious Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,281
    Location:
    Burien, WA
    Day 5 - Wed 8/1 - Big Springs Campground to Elkhorn Hot Springs - 220 Miles

    It was a beautiful morning in the neighborhood when most of us woke up around 6am. There was a little village (Island Park) nearby with a restaurant that Rob had eaten at the night before, so we decided to eat in town and also to refuel the bikes. We packed up and broke camp and found the fuel station but no restaurant. Later we learned that there was little restaurant in the Chevron station. We even did a 24 mile detour to see if anything was open up at the next intersection. Nothing was open. So we agreed, we'd just eat snacks from the food we carried on the bike. I had some jerky.

    So we headed off west on the Red Rock Lakes road which was paved for a few miles until we came upon a sign I liked:
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    We followed the gravel a number of miles up to the summit where we crossed the Continental Divide once again.
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    We rode for many miles west by the Red Rock Lakes National Wildlife Refuge.
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    It was important to continue to be bear aware and the large signs emphasized that.
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    It continued to be very hazy, but I did spot an abandoned structure.
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    This one had a more modern roof!
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    This sign in a little "village" caught my attention. I wonder what we do for FAST children.
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    Here's a fire tower at the administrative quarters for the Wildlife Refuge.
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    And another faded dream. . .
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    And another . . .

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    After crossing the long valley containing the Wildlife Refuge, we rode up the Ruby River Road until we encountered this sign which is a delight to my heart as it denotes we're about to ride the Gravellies which are my favorite off pavement ride in Montana. Lots of grizzly bears up there! The 347 road leads to the 290 road and the 290 road runs the length of the Gravelly Range.
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    It was really hazy and a storm shower threatened us, but the road was spectacular as always.
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    A first view of Black Butte in the haze.

    This is much better.
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    Here's Big Dog's and my Bikes
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    It was time to mosey on. The road goes on for miles and miles like this. One ridge after another.
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    Here's Eric and Stephanie motoring up the Gravelly Range Road 290.
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    Monument Ridge is the high point on the road at 9587 feet. Black Butte is 10,500
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    The sheep and cattle people live in this wagon for the summer. We were warmly greeted by the dogs.
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    And then more of this . . .
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    Eventually we had to make a left turn (west) and head down the Warm Springs Road where we stopped and admired the roadside spring which was crystal clear but not warm. Here's Rob.
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    Here's two of the 4 Pronghorns who ran in front of me.
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    Back on the Ruby River Road, we had to follow a water truck for a couple miles. Fortunately it wasn't slick.
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    We turned west off of the Ruby River Road and headed west onto what would be a real adventure. Along the way were more quashed dreams. . . This was at the end of the difficult section.
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    And there the picture taking stopped. We rode some 50-60 miles across some two track, up a steep hill, up another hill to a plateau, and across the plateau where at this intersection at the end of the plateau more quashed dreams were present. It was some of the most difficult riding of the trip with deep rock filled ruts, slick grass, and it seemed to go on forever. I didn't go down but a number of others did. We rode over the hill by the talcum mine and down a deep powdery dusty road into Dillon where many of us had our first real meal of the day at McDonalds and refueled the bikes. There Rob and I decided we would take a direct pavement route to Elkhorn Hot Springs. And we weren't the only ones!

    At the Elkhorn Hot Springs, the three of us decided to share a cabin so we could have a real bed and soak in the Hot Springs. I've got no photos of that, but it was wonderful. I slept in the loft, and even though breakfast the next morning was included in the room rate, we decided to get up early and leave and ride to Wisdom so we could eat in a really nice restaurant that Big Dog and I have eaten in previously. How would that work out? And what would the last dirt section of the ride be like. Stay tuned.
    #12
  13. Oldschoolrocker

    Oldschoolrocker a.k.a. EZE Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2017
    Oddometer:
    3,158
    Location:
    Reardan, WA
    Thats great stuff Timmer!!! Thank you my friend!!
    #13
  14. Timmer

    Timmer Curious Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,281
    Location:
    Burien, WA
    Day 6 - Thu 8/2 - Elkhorn Hot Springs to Stevensville - 178 miles

    All three of us woke up relatively early and glad that we had stayed in a cabin as it had rained overnight. We packed up and headed off via the Pioneer Scenic Byway and MT278 to Wisdom where we refueled and ate a wonderful breakfast at the Crossing Restaurant.
    [​IMG]
    Hevos Rancheros - Super Yummy
    [​IMG]

    After breakfast Rob & I rode west on MT43 to the Shultz Creek Road turnoff to ride the last 70 or so miles of dirt to the Skalkaho highway that we were on 6 days earlier. Big Dog decided to ride with BobZilla. They later caught up with us (not really too hard).
    Here's an introduction to the road and it was wonderful.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Here's BobZilla catching up to us.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    There was lots of this.
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Near the end and after a really rough rocky section we took a break and two side by sides came by and they were the first vehicles we had seen all day. Nearby was a little "fixer upper".
    [​IMG]

    We rejoined the pavement section of the Skalkaho Highway and rode on into Stevenville. Rob went on to where his trailer was parked and I proceeded to ride to the Long Riders BBQ in Stevensville which is owned and operated by Kinsman on this forum. The Long Riders BBQ was the last place that Ron Haraseth and I saw each other and we shared a meal together then. So to honor that relationship, I enjoyed another meal. Later Big Dog and HairLipDog joined me and the four of us enjoyed a good time together.

    I lingered on at the restaurant, hydrating and then headed out for the beginning of my ride home which would be some 600 miles. I thought I might ride to the halfway point at Colfax, but I ended up riding to Orofino and staying in the Konkelville Motel (very motorcycle friendly). I got there at 8:30pm after around 11 hours of riding and nearly 400 miles.

    The ride down the Idaho side of LOLO Pass was pretty eventful. There were the usual construction delays, but in addition one truck driver had a really bad day when his trailer slipped off the highway into the river.
    [​IMG]

    I also stopped and photographed the truck collection that was on display.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    And it was nice to not be in a hammock.
    [​IMG]

    One more day and I would be home. But that's for the last report. Stay tuned.
    #14
    simmons1 and Oldschoolrocker like this.
  15. Timmer

    Timmer Curious Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,281
    Location:
    Burien, WA
    Friday, August 3, 2018 - Orofino to Home

    I was in no hurry to get up plus the continental breakfast wasn't available until 7am. So I slept in and had a leisurely breakfast before packing up the bike and heading out to refuel at the 24 Hour pumps at the grocery store and then ride down the highway 12 beside Clearwater River. It was a nice clear morning with very little traffic. At Lewiston, I decided to ride the Spiral Highway up to rejoin ID95. The Spiral Highway is the original Lewiston Grade and it was replaced by the current road which doesn't have quite the same number of curves. It's a motorcyclist's dream road especially to ride it in the up direction which I would be doing. Near the top I saw a beautiful fox off to my right, but didn't have time to snap a photo.

    At the top I took a few pictures before heading north on ID95 which soon had an exit for WA195 which would take me to Colfax where I would refuel and visit with my relatives before riding across the state on WA26 to Vantage, take the old Vantage highway to Ellensburg, and then I90 to Seattle.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    The wind was buffeting me pretty good on the ride to Colfax and again on the road to Othello. At Othello, I found a Mexican restaurant which has really good ceviche. When I commented to the owner that the ceviche was the best I had had in a while and the other place in Othello had it, he noted to me that this restaurant succeeded the one that I had previously enjoyed it at.

    [​IMG]

    I pressed on in the blustery winds to Vantage, crossed the Vantage bridge and headed up the old Vantage highway. About 15 miles from Ellensburg my low fuel light came on, but I made it to the Conoco station on the east side of Ellensburg where I refueled. By this time it was very hot and even stronger winds. But I pressed on and made it over Snoqualmie Pass and home without incident. Here's a SPOT tracker map of the route which is nearly 2200 miles:
    Route  2018.JPG

    It was a good 9 days of riding although riding the WR with a 2x4 seat can be a bit uncomfortable. I'll have to see about getting that fixed. All throughout the ride I was thinking that this would be my last BOM1000. With my friend, Ron, gone, it sorta took the wind out of my sails for doing another ride. But would there be? Stay tuned in the PacificNWet section for any developments.

    Thanks to Rob for being my riding partner for 5 of the 6 days on the route. Thanks to Big Dog for the very pleasant conversations and encouragement. And thanks to all of the riders of the 2018 BOM1000 who turned out and made it another special event.
    #15
  16. Mudclod

    Mudclod Mojo Moto

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2010
    Oddometer:
    23,818
    Location:
    Killeen, TX.
    Outstanding! So many great images.
    #16
    Timmer likes this.
  17. Bigbob1

    Bigbob1 Rain Rider Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,182
    Location:
    Juneau Alaska
    Great ride, Thanks for organizing it!
    #17
    Timmer likes this.
  18. rnw2016

    rnw2016 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2016
    Oddometer:
    14
    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta
    Really enjoyed riding with you Tim, as well as all of the participants of the BOM. I really hope we can do it again! Thank you SO much for organizing this!

    I think next time I'll make a point of taking a portrait of all riders with their bikes.....
    #18
    Timmer, LC1 and Oldschoolrocker like this.
  19. Bob

    Bob Formerly H20Pumper Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2002
    Oddometer:
    3,516
    Location:
    Corral de Tierra CA, Ketchum ID
    Great report, thanks for all the pics.
    #19
  20. jonz

    jonz Miles are my mantra Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2004
    Oddometer:
    5,998
    Location:
    CA dez (it's a dry heat)/West Yellowstone,MT
    Nice job Timmer. Bummed I couldn't make it
    #20