Tire Patch ???? Opinions Please.

Discussion in 'GS Boxers' started by elkhunter, May 29, 2007.

  1. elkhunter

    elkhunter Been here awhile

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    So, I bought a brand new set of Mich. Anakees a week ago for the '04 GSA and have about 300 miles on them. After running about 100 miles in the twisties, I took to the trail this past weekend and logged about 50 miles on dirt roads... Very impressed with the tires' performance both on and off pavement. I am surprised to report that the Anakees are more sure footed than the previous TKC80s on dirt roads / gravel roads.

    Now to the problem: About 35 miles into this off pavement ride, I noticed my tires started to feel sloppy/loose. I pulled the GS over and low and behold, my rear tire had dropped from 40 psi to about 15 psi. Luckily I had my trusty pump/repair kit, so I was able to plug it, air it back up and get home. It has been keeping 40 psi for the past 3 days...And I have driven on it about 100 miles since without any issues or drop in air pressure.

    I've always thought that a patch on the interior of a tire was superior to a plug, so...

    What should I do?

    1. Get a patch on the tire and drive w/o fear

    2. Leve the plugs and drive w/o fear

    3. Replace the tire

    FYI: I've called my local BMW dealer and 4 other motorcycle / tire stores and I haven't been able to find anyone that will patch the tire "due to liability"...
    #1
  2. Some Dude

    Some Dude what attitude problem???

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    Correct, I doubt you'll find anyone willing to patch it. The best product to use is a patch with a pull through plug. This will hold up well and for the life of the tire regardless if the plug goes through the tread or a groove. You'll have to do that yourself however or have a buddy with access to a tire machine to make your life easier. Otherwise it's new tire time.
    #2
  3. elkhunter

    elkhunter Been here awhile

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    BMW Atlanta: So, since I don't want it to be "new tire time"....What is the name/manufacturer of this product and where can I buy one fo these hybrid patches?

    Anyone near 80863 have a tire machine they want to let me use :evil .

    Thanks.
    #3
  4. Holden

    Holden Long timer

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    I recently plugged a brand new (<50 miles) rear tire that a dealer threw out. (Dumpster diving has never been so rewarding)

    I used a pull through plug and have had no issues with it. A friend of mine who gets all his tires this way has had "0" issues. (He wont plug a front tire however )

    Good Luck.





    #4
  5. elkhunter

    elkhunter Been here awhile

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    I'm not ready to dive in dumpsters for my motorcycle tires:norton , but wouldn't mind getting my $ worth out of the tire I just bought 2 weeks ago. Safety is paramount, so I'm looking for confirmation from those who have patched and/or plugged tires in the past that this is not accepting stupid amounts of risk. I'd love to hear from those with experience, that have or have not had any issues thereafter with their repaired tire(s). TIA/
    #5
  6. JR356

    JR356 Long timer

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    Hi,

    Lots of folks(including myself) have also had long term success using the gooey string type plugs made by Camel or Monkey Grip,etc.
    They can be found at any auto parts store,even at 7 Eleven type stores.

    I would only plug long term if the defect was in the center third of the tread.Anything to the outside and it's new tire time.Also would really consider replacement if it was the front tire,no matter what.

    The patch plug previously mentioned is available at auto parts stores under various brands and it really is the best solution but does require tire removal.

    There is a writeup somewhere here by Jim VonBaden on using the string type plugs.
    Basically you remove the nail/screw/whatever,then ream out the hole a bit using the provided tool.Then attach the gooey plug to the insertion tool and lube it well(as well as the hole) with the provided cement.Then insert the plug about two thirds the way into the hole and quickly remove the insertion tool.You then trim off the excess plug and let everthing cure for a bit.Then air up the tire and check for leaks,then ride off.Be sure to check tire pressure frequently the first day or two.If everthing is good at this point,you should be set for the life of the tire.

    JR356
    #6
  7. Nitzo

    Nitzo Long timer

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    For years I have used the Stop and Go Tire Plugger as well as the cord glue plugs, (depending on the application) and have never had a problem with a high speed failure. I know, it might not be the right thing to do, but when you only have a couple of hundred miles on a tire and get a nail, I ain't replacing it. I also carry a can of puncture seal. (Ever had a flat in the middle of Alabama? I don't care if it does get all over the guy who is changing my tire shoes.) I also never leave home without my Cyclepump.
    #7
  8. jigdog

    jigdog Been here awhile

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    twice in the past (1991?) I have used an internal plug patch. i had a dealer demount the tire and patch it. Worked fine. No troubles at all. Sorry but i dont know the name of the patch, other that it was a plug patch and the dealer said dont exceed 80 mph. I have string plugged other tires without trouble although i keep an eagle eye on them. And i go pretty slow.
    #8
  9. BV BEEMER

    BV BEEMER Can I see some ID?

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    I trust these completely: http://www.safetyseal.com/

    I would use them in the rear no questions asked.

    The front, well it would have to be real straight forward.

    Call me crazy, but with many years, many tires, and hundreds of these plugs in high preasure truck/trailer tires, I have never had a problem. I go to lots of different landfills all the time.

    I would stay away from the cheap black ruber string/plugs for sure, and there might be others I would avoid as well. Problem is I don't know which ones they are, so I can only comment on the one I trust, and that may be reason enough to discard the tire. You would have to trust me(some jack-ass on the internet) and the plug.
    #9
  10. Beeming

    Beeming Itchy Feet

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    I once rode my 1997 GSX-R-600 half way around Australia with a plugged rear tyre. It leaked slowly so a can of Holts tyre sealant slowed down the leak a tad (don't the bike tyre shops hate when that stuff leaks out everywhere apon fitting a new hoop :evil )
    In future I would still ride with a plugged tyre but this time I would use a mushroom plug and fit a tube to be on the safe side.

    Going off road in a remote area ? Replace the tyre without doubt as not much help around if the rough going makes the tyre fracture at the plug?

    Good luck

    Tads
    #10
  11. yelostn78

    yelostn78 Have GS will Travel

    Joined:
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    I recently was on a short 5 day trip. On day 4 I got a rather large puncture just off center in the rear tire of my 1150gs. of course it was on a new set of metzelers with just the trip mileage on them. I pulled out the trusty stringy tar snake type plug and went to it. Reamed the whole, used the cement. So got the tire aired up and went about 5 miles. stopped to check the air pressure and it was good. went about 5 more miles and the plug came out. repeated the process once again. Made it about 17 miles this time. repeated the patching, but then rode about 50 the rest of the 120 miles to my destination.

    The next day I went to wall mart and purchased some more plugs. It was a sunday in the middle of nowhere in Nebraska- so I bought some string like plugs that had a grey sticky outer that surrounded a black fiber inner. It also came with a big tube of something monkey or monkey something and I put it away. Well made it another 120miles.

    Not meaning to take over the thread, this long story has a point.

    So I used the new patch and lots of the new glue after reaming the heck out of the pinky size hole. I noticed that right off the rubber of the tire kind of melted from the glue. I guess vulcanization in progress. Well that plug has held for over 2k miles at all speeds and terrain.

    The big difference that we think caused the failure/success of the different plugs would be the age. the first three were 5-7 years old, the good plug was brand new.

    I have purchased a tireplugger setup that is a pistol looking device with the t shape plugs, so far have not had to use it.
    #11
  12. Mudcat

    Mudcat Unregistered

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    I just finished putting 1,000 miles a plugged tire. First motorcycle tire I ever plugged, it worked great. I never babied it. I did check the tire before each ride; it never lost air until the tire was worn out.
    If I had a new tire with a hole in it, I would plug it first but if that did not hold I would patch it with a good quality automotive patch. The tire is not going to Blow; the worst that will happen is it can start leaking. But you will have warning even if it happens out on the road.
    #12
  13. bykemike

    bykemike "ready to navigate" Supporter

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    I picked up a nail in my brand new Tourance (had a thread here recently) and on everyone's advice I plugged it. Used a cheap gummy strip plug and have been riding this tire daily since and have not lost any air and feel confident in the repair.

    +1 on the plug

    Mike
    #13