Tire plugger kit

Discussion in 'Hard. Core. (1090/1190/1290)' started by DakarBlues, May 6, 2020.

  1. DakarBlues

    DakarBlues One-everythinged man

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    Which tire plugger kit is best ?
    I am running Scorpion at this moment, but I might graduate to Bridgestone or Dunlop.
    Woke up to find a nail in my rear tire, losing 6 or 7 psi/day.
    #1
  2. theGermanBlOkE

    theGermanBlOkE Been here awhile

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    Check out dyna plug - we give it to our customers when they rent a bike from us.
    #2
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  3. miken0vf

    miken0vf Been here awhile

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    I've always used the rope type, never had one fail, can get the ropes at any auto, harbour freight, walmart etc. I use the straight handles cause they pack better. The T handles feel better when in use though. I put an elect nut and heat shrink on the shafts to prevent pokes in the kit.

    Attached Files:

    #3
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  4. Barekat

    Barekat Looking to get dirty

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    I'm with @miken0vf ...cheap rope pugs work perfect.
    #4
  5. Saltboxlad

    Saltboxlad Long timer

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    +1, ive got this one:

    [​IMG]
    #5
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  6. Memnok

    Memnok Fly high, go far.

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    Dynaplug didn't work for me. They were too small and sometimes I had to put two or three in the same hole before it would hold air. I've been using the rope type (from post above) and have better success. Problem is, every flat is different, so what works great once may not be an option the next time.
    #6
  7. theGermanBlOkE

    theGermanBlOkE Been here awhile

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    And that's how it' should be done. It says in the manual when the hole is big you should use more then one.
    #7
  8. Memnok

    Memnok Fly high, go far.

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    Can't afford to use more than one while making payments on my 1290. ;)
    #8
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  9. brianbrannon

    brianbrannon They'll ride up with wear

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    +1 rope plugs.
    #9
  10. cbrxxcess

    cbrxxcess Been here awhile

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    Rope plugs for me. I have had the opportunity to use dyna plugs and mushroom plugs. Just prefer rope plugs.
    #10
  11. Marki_GSA

    Marki_GSA Long timer

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    Stop and go plugs used them in bikes, cars and vans, they have always worked
    #11
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  12. Kmont

    Kmont Been here awhile Supporter

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    I have used the Tire plugger kit many times and it works great for nail holes and similar. Not any good for a rock slice. Used just a few weeks ago and held air without leaks until I replace the tire last week.




    [​IMG]
    #12
  13. Zuber

    Zuber Zoob Supporter

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    You need them both. The Stop N Go plugs work great for nail holes. No glue, they are held in by mechanical. Lubed by engine oil to insert.
    The rubber ropes are needed when you get hit by an arrowhead. You can run a line of them to seal it up. Takes cleaning with alcohol is needed and you need to buy fresh tire glue every year.
    The ropes work good on truck tires too. I've probably patched more truck tires while riding my bike.
    #13
  14. Memnok

    Memnok Fly high, go far.

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    The ropes are good for trailside repair, but if you are at home, you should really pull the tire off and use a patch plug from the inside. The Dynaplugs and ropes are really just to get you home.

    [​IMG]

    #14
  15. crossbones

    crossbones Been here awhile

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    On my first rear on a KTM SA, I got a nasty big screw through the tread at around 2500 miles.
    Had to fix it on a trip with a rope/cement patch.
    I took it easy the whole way home.
    Forgot to have it fixed right.
    at about 4500 miles, got a couple more nails in the tire, fixed with rope again.
    I may not have actually forgotten, but never got around to fixing the tire.
    Put 12000 miles on the tire.
    When the shop pulled it off, there were 5 rope plugs in the tire.
    I guess I actually did forget about three of them.
    The rope plugs work really well.
    #15
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  16. jhfairch

    jhfairch Wish I would have started sooner

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    +1 rope plugs what @miken0vf says. You can cram multiple plugs in large holes. Never had one fail. I fixed some knarly cuts with these.
    #16
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  17. Rock709

    Rock709 Been here awhile

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    I have used many rope type plugs in automotive tires and even quad tires and they've never caused an issue. I have an antique truck with tires almost 20 years old and one with a rope plug....no leaking air to date. I suspect the tires will dry rot and leak air first.

    Personally I would plug a m/c tire to get me out of the woods....and then I'd replace the tire.
    #17