Top Ten Roads in Mexico

Discussion in 'Latin America' started by Tama's Tigre, Mar 31, 2008.

  1. JDowns

    JDowns Sounds good, let's go!

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    Hola Senor Trice!
    Thanks for the props. I certainly enjoy reading your Mexican ADVstories as well. The next time I pass through San Antonio, I'll have to drop by to compare notes if you're in town.

    Adios amigo,
    John Downs
    #61
  2. Tricepilot

    Tricepilot Bailando Con Las Estrellas Super Moderator Super Supporter

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    te esperamos
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  3. dtop1

    dtop1 Long timer

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    That section of Mex 15 is known as Mil Cumbres (1000 peaks) and was the first highway from Mexico City to Guadalajara. It was started in 1926, originally was dirt and paving was completed in 1939. It's a fantastic dualsport moto road. The surface is just rough enough to keep most traffic off but not so rough as to not be fun.
    The foto of 2 dogs chasing my bike was taken near Mil Cumbres. Dan
    #63
  4. JDowns

    JDowns Sounds good, let's go!

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    Hola Dtop1,

    I sure appreciate all the great Mexican travel encyclopedic knowledge you bring to ADVrider. You are going to LOVE Mil Cumbres with fresh pavement. It was like a race track yesterday. The road crews have been busy.

    Best,
    John Downs
    #64
  5. Tricepilot

    Tricepilot Bailando Con Las Estrellas Super Moderator Super Supporter

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    There are two major areas where Mexico's oil revenue has been deployed:

    (1) Road infrastructure
    (2) Education, especially bringing satellite-based education to ejidos

    There is also a third major area where the money has gone but it is a very politcal discussion and not worth opening a can of worms here
    #65
  6. dtop1

    dtop1 Long timer

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    John: I loved it the way it was. Because the road was rough it kept traffic down and kept the excitement level up as the bike's tires chattered over the pavement when leaned in a curve. Dan
    #66
  7. kdowell

    kdowell Adventurer

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    dtop,
    You mentioned a few months ago (in this thread) that you had ridden hwy 16. We're possibly headed that way, next month. Trying to decide where we want to go. We dont have time to go too far south. We've been to Creel and Parral, Durango,Maz, etc. Tamalipas, San Luis, etc. We were thinking about why 16 to San Carlos and Alamos.
    We're on sport touring bikes, so no heavy off roading. Looking for fun roads, good scenery, and all the other usual greatness to be had in Mexico. We're starting in Austin, so the route would be west.

    Any thoughts or suggestions?

    KD
    #67
  8. dtop1

    dtop1 Long timer

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    Hwy 16 is do-able on a sport bike. I once did it on a BMW RT. From Austin you could cross at Presidio, go through the city of Chihuahua then hwy 16 either to Hermosillo or, because you're interested in Alamos, etc, cut off 16 on to 12 to Cd. Obregon. South from there to Alamos. If you have the time, I'd also recommend El Fuerte. It's an interesting town on a river; nice places to stay and you can do a boat ride on the river. Then head back north to San Carlos.
    On the way back, on the northern edge of Hermosillo, take 14 east and 118 North to rt 2 east. 118 is named the Rio Sonora route, is very historic and has a string of small, historic towns strung along it. Cross the border at Naco or Douglas then hwy 80 NNE to hwy 9 east to parallel the border and go through Colombus, NM, the town that Pancho Villa attacked. If you need to turn in your vehicle permit then cross at Douglas because you can't do it at Naco. Also there's no gas on hwy 9 so you might be range limited on a sport bike. Dan
    #68
  9. JDowns

    JDowns Sounds good, let's go!

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    I went on a couple more nice roads in southern Mexico. Mex 190 libre gets noticably rougher after crossing over from Pueble state to Oaxaca, but was still heaps of fun as it twisted down from the arid Oaxacan plateau through winding curvy canyon roads.
    Another nice one was Mex 220 libre which twisted up, up, up into the mountains. Many of the topes had spaces in the center to ride through. So that was nice. This road was Mex 211 libre when I came up to the La Mesilla crossing into Guatemala in 2006. The bridges were washed out after a hurricane back then, so a lot rougher back then. But yesterday it was blue skies and puffy clouds with the cranking and banking that moto dreams are made of. I stopped for a break and the restaurant owner came out and shared the Kawasaki love as he opened up his garage and showed me his Ninja. He showed me movies on his cameraphone of him and his buddies carving up the canyons. His cellphone had a crack in the screen, but the three quarters of the screen I could see looked like they were having heaps of fun. Which is what it's all about after all.

    Came into Lake Atitlan on Guat CA1 last night. HOLY COW! What a great road. Freshly paved with reflectors lighting up the lanes like an airport runway. Nothing but sweeping horseshoe hairpins winding through the mountains. I think I'm in heaven. Blue warm sunny skies as I type this on the shores of the lake.
    But That's for another thread. I'll report back to this thread on my way home.

    Reporting from ADVheaven.
    Your faithful cub reporter,
    John Downs
    #69
  10. kdowell

    kdowell Adventurer

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    dtop,
    How long does it take to cross from say Cuauhtemoc to Hermosillo?
    Is it mostly just road or are there places worthy of a stop?
    Basaseachic? worth a night or head on west to try to fit La fuerte into the trip?

    thoughts?
    #70
  11. dtop1

    dtop1 Long timer

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    Cuauhtemoc to Hermosillo is a full day's ride. It's only about 350 miles but with all the curves and road hazards (sand, rocks, potholes, animals) you'll be tired by the time you get to Hermosillo. In many ways I think Creel to Hermosillo is the hardest 1-day ride I've done in Mexico.
    The one thing to see along the route is the waterfall at Basaseachic. There are two places to see it; at one you hike to the top of the falls, less than a km. The other is the viewpoint from the opposite side of the canyon that you can ride to. If you were to stop to see the falls from both locations you'd be hard-pressed to make it to Hermosillo before dark even with an early, but cold, start from Cuauhtemoc. Dan
    #71
  12. cwc

    cwc . Supporter

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    Opinion follows.

    I've been to both sides of Basaseachi Falls and neither can match the scenery on the roads to get there IMO.

    I have heard people (Who were actually riding motorcycles) complain that there are too many curves on Hwy. 16.:huh

    As of early '09 there was no direct paved road from Alamos to El Fuerte.

    El Fuerte is a nice place to stay if you have time. Try to allow at least an afternoon and a morning to look around, sit in the middle of town and watch people, visit the fort etc.

    We stay at the Guerrero motel or for about 1½ times as much at the Posada del Don Porfirio. Both have pleasant courtyards for resting and securely parking your bike between forays. Neither is very obvious as you drive by, just drive into the center of town and when the pedestrian traffic gets thick you will be very near the Posada and about 2 blocks from the Guerrero. Ask locally. There are also Gringo style motels where the busloads of white-haired tourist unload if that's your preference.
    #72
  13. dtop1

    dtop1 Long timer

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    You can also get on the train to Creel at El Fuerte. Its advantage over Los Mochis is that you leave there about 1.5 hrs after it leaves Los Mochis. Most hotels will let you leave your bikes with them while you take the train.
    In El Fuerte I like the Hotel La Choza www.hotellachoza.com.mx located right on the main square. It's reasonably priced, has a good restaurant and is very friendly.
    There still is no direct paved road between Alamos and El Fuerte. You have to return to hwy 15, go south then inland to El Fuerte, a little over 2 hrs in all. If you go to Alamos I rec. the short excursion into the tiny town of La Aduana. The road in was being improved and possibly paved in early '09. If it's still dirt, it's easy even on a sport-touring bike. Dan
    #73
  14. Tricepilot

    Tricepilot Bailando Con Las Estrellas Super Moderator Super Supporter

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  15. Lone Rider

    Lone Rider Registered User

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    It's a must-do, as far as paved moto roads go.
    Start early and feel free to cry Uncle as often as you like.
    When you look at the geography, you may be able to truly appreciate this route.
    #75
  16. dtop1

    dtop1 Long timer

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    You have very good taste my friend and apparently a much fatter billetera than mine. Soy pobre y codo. Dan
    #76
  17. Tricepilot

    Tricepilot Bailando Con Las Estrellas Super Moderator Super Supporter

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  18. colomtnbiker

    colomtnbiker wimpy old guy

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    Originally Posted by cwc
    ....
    I have heard people (Who were actually riding motorcycles) complain that there are too many curves on Hwy. 16.:huh .....



    I haven't been following this thread but I/we have experience on this road.

    First off, I can totally agree with those who say Rt. 16 has to many curves.

    Three years ago, my wife and I took off from Tucson heading to Creel. Riding with my wife, we ride leisurely and it took 3 days to get to Creel. Our experience on Rt. 16, included dense fog, heavy rain, snow and lots of rocks/boulders on the road

    This was mid January and we spent one night in Tecoripa in a small motel with no heat. That's when we learned the word, calentador or heater. It's usually hot so they don't have heaters, we snuggled close that night.

    The next day was only 80 miles but we had the big rains, heavy dense fog and snow, plus the boulders on the road and falling on the road in front of us. We had no visibility to speak of and we never knew what was going to be around the next curve and yes this road has curves.

    We spent the night in Yecora and, yahoo, they had a heater in the room. The next day to Creel was awesome with blue skies and clear roads.

    We live in the mountains of western Colorado and we thought we knew twisty roads. The first few days in Mexico kicked our ass. But, after spending 3 months in Mexico/Central America and riding even twistier roads, we would love to go back and do Rt. 16 again on clear days and have a kickass time.

    Rt. 16 and many roads in Mexico/Central America are fun, fun, fun twisty roads. If you don't like the twisties, it would be safer to stay on the cuotas or toll roads.
    #78
  19. crashmaster

    crashmaster ow, my balls!

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    Mex 16 on a dry, clear day.:clap If you ride it hard, its a full on workout. Really exciting on knobbies. :D After 7 months of Mexican and Guatemalan twisties I think its still my favorite. But yes, its a workout. Mex 16 in rain and fog, not so much fun I think. Those were the conditions in which I rode Mex 40, and throw in a few hundred semis as well. Not fun. Exciting, but not fun with those extra challenges.
    #79
  20. Trailblazer

    Trailblazer no cualquier gringo

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    OK, I see these places on the map, but the connections are less than obvious.
    For example, which route between Zacapoaxtla-Zacatlán?
    I don't see any connection between Zaragoza-Cuetzalán.

    #80