Top Ten Roads in Mexico

Discussion in 'Latin America' started by Tama's Tigre, Mar 31, 2008.

  1. LCA

    LCA RRX ed

    Joined:
    May 18, 2010
    Oddometer:
    2
    Location:
    East Coast
    While on a Monterrey-to-Guanajuato ride I did a day-ride to the small town of Rayones (tucked in the middle of the Sierra Madre mountains), and I've never forgotten that road—you can see it winding its way around the mountain at right. You definitely want an off-road friendly bike (not the ZX-10 I was set up with for that trip), and it doesn't hurt to watch out for mini-avalanches, but the views and the quiet of the town you end up in are knockouts.
    [​IMG]
  2. thetourist

    thetourist Just passing thru

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2005
    Oddometer:
    6,915
    Location:
    Moscow, Idaho
    I'm not the Mexico traveler that some of you are, but 16 is the best long road I've ridden. I really like primitive pavement (no signs,unmarked corners).

    I've ridden it twice. At speed it will wear you down. I chased Hektoglider to Yecora where we had a long lunch then camped at Basaseachic campground.

    Moctezuma to Huachinera is very good and a great village at the end.

    The Observatory Road in Baja is an outstanding 60 mi. No road for timid flatlanders. It had me hugging the inside and I ride skinny high roads all the time.

    Alamos has some nice expensive homes. It is worth looking around. I recommend the walking tour.
  3. thetourist

    thetourist Just passing thru

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2005
    Oddometer:
    6,915
    Location:
    Moscow, Idaho

    Does a dirt/gravel road go thru from Alamos to El Fuerte? My map shows a road. I may try that next spring.
  4. dtop1

    dtop1 Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2003
    Oddometer:
    1,305
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    Yes, it's a fairly well-graded dirt road that goes through a couple of small towns; it's a nice ride. Four of us did it on GS's a couple of years ago. There is a lot of drug activity in that area so it's not recommended to stray very far off the road. Dan
  5. italiano

    italiano Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2008
    Oddometer:
    193
    Location:
    South of the border
    Following The Post In This Tread I Try To Cross From Paraiso Tabasco To Sanchez Magallanes. The Lanscape Is Beautifull The Road Is Almost Gone And For Some Km You Have To Cross Inside The Beach. Nice Experience. Now I Know That A Gs Is Tooooo Heavy For Loose Sand.
    (i Cannot Place A Photo Donno Why)
  6. cleanandjerk

    cleanandjerk Adventurer

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2009
    Oddometer:
    20
    Location:
    Auckland
    Can anyone tell me what the road from El Fuerte to Creel is like, specifically the section from Temoris to El Divisadero?

    Am travelling 2-up on a loaded GSA.

    Thanks!
  7. thetourist

    thetourist Just passing thru

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2005
    Oddometer:
    6,915
    Location:
    Moscow, Idaho

    Search and you shall find. Lots of ride reports on this route. I gave up on my TA. High water at the rivers. Way too rough for me to even think about 2-up.

    Creel to Batopilas is a good gravel road. Watch for goats, burros and trucks.
  8. HWSNBN

    HWSNBN Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,894
    Location:
    Playing a d00d, disguised as another d00d
    This is one of the best, most favorite threads I've ever seen on ADV. Highlighter in hand, I'm defacing my Guia Roji. These are yellow lines I want to someday roll a tire over.:D
  9. Lone Rider

    Lone Rider Registered User

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2002
    Oddometer:
    25,130
    Location:
    out and about
    From Temoris into San Rafael, and pavement on to Creel, the roads should be fine.

    I think you're also OK from El Fuerte/Choix going north up to the ridgeline unless there has been recent bad weather on the canyon road up through Piedras Verdes. If it's has been raining, take her over to Alamos for a day or two. She'll like that town.

    My info is a couple of years old, but I think these particular roads are being continually improved because of mining activity and the use of big trucks/equipment.

    El Fuerte to Urique, or onward is a full day, so leave with the roosters so you don't feel the need to push it. There's a small tienda at the summit between Choix and Tubares where you can get a snack and drink, and is a nice spot for a break.

    If you run into a bad spot or chewed up, rutted section, just have your passenger stretch her legs for a few yards. No biggy.
    You'll enjoy this backcountry ride.
  10. cleanandjerk

    cleanandjerk Adventurer

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2009
    Oddometer:
    20
    Location:
    Auckland
    Thanks, that's just the info I was looking for.

    In Choix now, will head north via Tubares to Cerocahui tomorrow.
  11. Lone Rider

    Lone Rider Registered User

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2002
    Oddometer:
    25,130
    Location:
    out and about
    I understand that y'all are two-up.
    I strongly suggest that you hang the right to go down to Urique.
    Urique doesn't have the well-established tourist infrastructure of Batopilas, but it has enough for you to feel comfortable, and IMO, it's the best 'regular road' deep/steep ride into the canyons.

    Go to the end of the road when entering Urique, turn left, stop at the Plaza Restaurant on the right, get a huge room (about $35) which is back up the hill a few blocks, and then go back to the restaurante to chill, drink, and eat. Urique will greatly add to your trip - no BS.

    edit:
    You can reach Cero faster and easier than you can Urique, so if y'all are bone tired, and/or if it's getting late, save Urique for the next day. But do not skip it.
  12. HWSNBN

    HWSNBN Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,894
    Location:
    Playing a d00d, disguised as another d00d

    Theres 2 hotels on the square in Cerocahui. One is very ritzy and expensive, upwards of $175 a night, and bent on catering to mostly older folk American tourists. The other is behind the grocery store and run by a really nice guy and his wife who will cook some excellent food for you and serve it in their own dining room. I think it was $20/night with a few bones extra for food. Rooms were clean, had bathrooms and showers and even a tv (only got one channel). I'd take my wife there.. maybe not my gf but it'd be ok for the wife.:D
  13. cwc

    cwc . Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2005
    Oddometer:
    1,280
    Location:
    Minnesota
    There is another just on the NW corner of the square. A little more basic but looked OK. In a pinch there is another just west of the square that has wood heat and not much in the way of amenities. There are two more on the west side of the road between Cerocahui and Bahuichivo but they are pricier. First choice for me would be behind the store.

    There is a guy who has cabins etc on the north side of Mesa de Arturo too. Inquire locally.

    There are also 4 motels in Urique. The Estrella on the hill and three on the south end of the main street. The Canyon is pretty basic but run by really nice people. The Barrancas next door is a little nicer but not deluxe. There is a third that I don't know the name of but is brand new. It's on the opposite side of the street from the other two and a bit north. All three have more secure parking than the Estrella, but OTOH I've parked overnight right in the street in front of the Canyon with no problems.

    First choice for me in Urique would be the Barrancas because it has an onsite restaurant. The Canyon owners have a decent restaurant across the street also. If there is any kind of celebration in town I'd go to the Estrella because it is farther from the noise.
  14. Lone Rider

    Lone Rider Registered User

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2002
    Oddometer:
    25,130
    Location:
    out and about
    The porch off of the second floor restaurant is nice with good views of the riverside - people, burros, whatever.
    Their bar, downstairs, can be rowdy, and looks like it caters to the local worker trade.
    Air con is upstairs, with fans in the first floor rooms.

    I like the very rear dining area at the Plaza. You can go up front and grab your own Carta Blancas, or whatever, outta the cooler yourself. No waiting. They count the empties.

    Charlie, I didn't know there were four hotels in Urique. Good info.
  15. cleanandjerk

    cleanandjerk Adventurer

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2009
    Oddometer:
    20
    Location:
    Auckland
    Thanks for all the advice.

    After an awful lot of rain and taking advice from locals that the arroyos would be deep and impassable we decided against heading up to Creel on this trip :(. We did take a short exploratory ride from Choix 18km along a paved road to a place called Huites where there is a big hydro-electric project. At this point it was clear that the maps we have with use were useless and that the only locals we could find didn't know which way Tubares was.

    We set out along the only road we could find which was a fairly rough but very rideable dirt road, just to have a look. After a mile or so (yes - not very far) I came to the following conclusions:-

    - we had no GPS or physical map coverage of the area
    - we'd been advised that that the road ahead would have water crossings that were high
    - I fet like every time we went over a bump I could feel the pannier frames groan

    So to cut a long story short we bailed. To give some context, we are two weeks into a 10 month trip from Los Angeles to Argentina. We've been pretty restrained on now much gear we have with us so the bike is manageable but still about 470kg fuelled with us and our stuff and as such aren't really planning on straying too hard from the sealed stuff.

    I think I'd like to come back and do the ride 1-up with a mate for backup (I don't have much off-tarmac experience but have been doing some training).

    Your advice has inspired me to want to get down into Batopilas and Urique so I'll add that to the Trans-America trail trip I've got pencilled in for a couple of years down the road.

    Thanks again for your helpful responses (and the other contributors too).

    Iain
    http://cuentosdelcamino.wordpress.com
  16. cleanandjerk

    cleanandjerk Adventurer

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2009
    Oddometer:
    20
    Location:
    Auckland
    I rode Mex-15 east out of Morelia today and it was awesome - one of the best twisties that I've ever ridden! Bend after bend for the best part of an hour up into the clouds and down again with hardly any other vehicles in either direction.

    The road has some really good positive camber on some sets of curves making it really fun to pick a line through several tight curves. Just awesome.

    Watch out for some water running across the road in places. Encountered a couple of cows in the middle of the road too and plenty more at the sides. The odd vehicle coming in the opposite direction was a fair way onto my side of the road so needed to take a wide line on blind corners.
  17. MikeMike

    MikeMike Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Oddometer:
    4,150
    When medical science comes up with something as good as that, the rest of the world will understand why we ride.
  18. italiano

    italiano Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2008
    Oddometer:
    193
    Location:
    South of the border
    ONEOF THE BEST CURVY ROADS IN MEXICO


    <a href="http://s1090.photobucket.com/albums/i364/PECHEIMPRESIONES/?action=view&amp;current=31nico.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/advrider-photobucket-images/images/P/PECHEIMPRESIONES_31nico.jpg" border="0" alt="Photobucket"></a>
    <a href="http://s1090.photobucket.com/albums/i364/PECHEIMPRESIONES/?action=view&amp;current=30PADONDE_D96D.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/advrider-photobucket-images/images/P/PECHEIMPRESIONES_30PADONDE_D96D.jpg" border="0" alt="Photobucket"></a>
  19. jfman

    jfman Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2012
    Oddometer:
    2,941
    Location:
    Montreal (traveling Americas June '17 to May '18)
    Me gusto this thread :ear
  20. MikeMike

    MikeMike Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Oddometer:
    4,150
    Where to begin? Hmmmm...

    That road to the Zongolica (the paved one of the 4 routes in and out) is not too bad. A little short, but the first time I ever saw someone's passenger vomiting off the back of the bike because of vertigo.:deal

    If you like that kind of riding, try the route up from Misantla to Naolinco via El Nueve (or better still, ride in from Vega de Alatorre on the coast and go via Colipa to El Nueve), has a few "deadman's curves" on it. Do it on a foggy or cloudy day and it will change your life. Or you'll change your shorts. Take the waterfall detour for the brecha that ends up at El Porvenir and you'll pat yourself on the back.

    The road up to El Cofre de Perote is a good one, best of luck. Not an easy climb, I've tried it twice and given up once, riding solo in a snowstorm (yeah, a snowstorm in Mexico go figure, ok, a wet snowfall with zero visibility) and another time when I got stuck on the penultimate corner.

    The route up to one of the climber's shelters on El Pico de Orizaba is a challenge. Worse if you are susceptible to altitude sickness. Like El Cofre, the route up is not that big a deal, it is coming down that is the challenge.
    If you get really lucky, you can skip the climber's shelter and head for the large millimeter telescope at the top of the neighboring peak la Sierra Negra. The lucky part is if the security gate is open and unmanned.

    Someone has already posted pics of the obligatory lane changing route that runs from Alcultzingo up to Puerto del Aire before the Puebla state line. That is a good one, real fun in a heavy fog and rain, just like the neighboring Cumbres de Maltrata on the other side of the valley. Do the "old Cumbres route" if you want some real fun. Someone wrote a song about the Cumbres.

    Any of the 4 routes through the "other" Sierra Negra and the Sierra Fria south of Orizaba and into Puebla and Oaxaca are all paved and rarely ridden. All are excellent routes for riding and views.

    The run up to Los Humeros in Puebla via Perote is a good ride, the geo-thermal site of Los Humeros is worth the trip. If you are reading an old Guia Roji, it will show a paved route in and out via Tezuitlan. One of the funniest mistakes you can find in the Guia Roji.

    Naolinco to Plan de las Hayas via Mafafas is great ride, but a real ball buster.:deal Old Guia Rojis show it as paved. Which is another extremely good example of Guia Roji humor!

    But the grandaddies are the paved route from Tlapacoyan to Teziutlan which is a mini Tail of the Dragon type ride and the brecha route from the Zongolica into Mixtla de Altimirano. Ride those two in one day and you can say you pretty much know road conditions in Mexico. In fact, there are more than 20 really good roads within a 150km radius of Veracruz. Try them.:deal

    Premium fuel is not always available. The high elevation Pemex (10,500ft) over the pass from Acocomotla down to Saltillo La Fragua or Guadalupe Victoria, Puebla doesn't have Premium. Nor do the Pemex stations in the Sierra Negra/Sierra Fria. Gas up in the valley, first and then later in Tehuacan. Stop in at Tehuipango and get directions to the little archeological site that is hidden behind a priest's residence.

    If anyone is serious about riding these routes, I will send you maps and pics when you are here in Mexico if you think you'll need them. Some of the routes are not on maps, happens a lot in Mexico.

    If you are spending time in these areas, base yourself out of Orizaba for a month or so.:deal You won't be disappointed and you'll be riding roads that most riders either have missed or don't even know existed. If you are dropping down the Gulf side and heading to the Pacific side, go via el Cañon de Lobos in Morelos, a fun ride but a little boring after you have done a few of the above routes.