torque wrench for the 640a

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by meat popsicle, May 9, 2005.

  1. Loadedagain

    Loadedagain making chips

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2003
    Oddometer:
    26,763
    Location:
    West Vancouver, BC
    that'd be one reason i like my dial torque wrench... in your case... if you think they are not torqued to spec... click 'em again.
    #81
  2. meat popsicle

    meat popsicle Ignostic

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2004
    Oddometer:
    14,568
    Location:
    Circumlocution Office of Little Dorrit
    thats what I thought but it does seem like it puts a tad more load on them each time. shouldn't - ok - I will believe. :D Guess I could check the clicker with the dial wrench...
    #82
  3. Loadedagain

    Loadedagain making chips

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2003
    Oddometer:
    26,763
    Location:
    West Vancouver, BC
    yup... it does. not a good idea to keep going round and round.
    #83
  4. meat popsicle

    meat popsicle Ignostic

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2004
    Oddometer:
    14,568
    Location:
    Circumlocution Office of Little Dorrit
    so the mechanism of these, dial or clicker, is not infallible. every time you check the torque you can be putting more on... good to know. :D
    #84
  5. Mack

    Mack Gone, but never forgotten. RIP, Mack...

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2002
    Oddometer:
    3,797
    Location:
    Austin, Texas USA Native Oregonian
    Standard practice, bring the fastners up together and crisscross tighten them. Three - four rounds, first round: spin'em down finger tight and/or so there are no gaps, then snug'em up; I usually put my hand right over the wrench head to minimise the leverage, this is where you will feel a big jump in force to turn the fastners. Third tep tak'em up to say 75-80% (it's all feel) but you can either set your torque wrench and back check your ratchet/wrench or get a feel for the tightness so that it takes a certain rough amount of degrees to reach final torque. Just by feel/guesstimate when I switch from ratchet or wrench to tq. wrench it's rare to need less then half a turn or more then one and a half. With clickers, make sure you keep the wrench square on both planes, your hand on the handle at the end, and consistantly use the same force/pull/speed, if that makes sense, hard to explain, easy to do.
    #85
  6. meat popsicle

    meat popsicle Ignostic

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2004
    Oddometer:
    14,568
    Location:
    Circumlocution Office of Little Dorrit
    perfect Mack - well explained. thanks!
    #86
  7. Nom de Guerre

    Nom de Guerre Long timer

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2004
    Oddometer:
    2,034
    Location:
    Pasadena, CA
    Cool, got it, thanks.

    I was already doing some of that stuff (crisscrossing, and snugging them up finger tight first).

    Good tip on having your hand right on the ratchet head initially to feel the jump in force necessary.

    :thumb
    #87
  8. Mack

    Mack Gone, but never forgotten. RIP, Mack...

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2002
    Oddometer:
    3,797
    Location:
    Austin, Texas USA Native Oregonian
    I hope that made sense, it mainly reduces the torque by keeping your hand "inboard" closer to the socket and/or wrench head, sort of self limits, and helps to keep things consistant.

    IMO, a big part of "doing it right" is being consistant, so that you develop a feel that is reproducable, and developing a feel lets you know when something just isn't right: bunged up threads, contamination, gaulling (sic?), etc, etc. I can't tell you how many times my instinct has told me something just wasn't right based on feel, I find I really want to ignore it, just discounting that it's me, and that nothing is wrong, but 9 times out of ten when you pull things back apart, something ain't right: incorrect build up of parts, something is fouled. ie foreign object, bad fastner, etc.

    Wish I could explain this stuff better, it's so much easier for me to show someone, rather then try and explain it.
    #88
  9. Nom de Guerre

    Nom de Guerre Long timer

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2004
    Oddometer:
    2,034
    Location:
    Pasadena, CA
    Makes perfect sense. I understand what you meant, but I know what you mean about being more difficult to explain than show. I find I have that problem frequently. Descriptions of technical processes are sometimes elusive, although the process you are trying to describe can be rather simple at the heart of it. In any case, you were quite cler and helpful. Thanks!
    #89
  10. meat popsicle

    meat popsicle Ignostic

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2004
    Oddometer:
    14,568
    Location:
    Circumlocution Office of Little Dorrit
    A bump for a good thread and a new question from me on Torque Wench Use:

    Recently vrago noticed that my handlebars were loose. I was too busy :ricky to notice... anyways, the clamps were tight (no rotation) but the under the top triple - hold the handlebars to the triple nuts were loose - about three rotations loose by vragos estimation! :eek1

    So I get home a dig thru the manual - no specific torque setting so I have to look up the nut rating (M10) and then go back to the chart... 37 ft.lb

    Well if you have tightened these nuts you know there ain't much room in there for turning the wrench (1-2 clicks is all I get on the ratchet), so my question is this: does that effect the torque measurement of my wrench? Or will it break away when it reaches 37 ft.lb - I asked before going on because it seemed like it was taking forever and I didn't want to stretch my nuts out! (see above for reference)

    I miss Mack... :cry
    #90
  11. gunnerbuck

    gunnerbuck Island Hopper

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Oddometer:
    6,634
    Location:
    N.V.I, B.C.
    I've got 3 torque wrentches and 2 of them are clickers . Both of them {1/4" & 3/8"} seem to work as intended even in a short throw situation, it just seems like you're overtorquing because it takes so long to take up slack in that situation. You could always check it with a bolt in a vice to see if your wrench clicks properly on a short throw.
    #91
  12. meat popsicle

    meat popsicle Ignostic

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2004
    Oddometer:
    14,568
    Location:
    Circumlocution Office of Little Dorrit
    Well, it's a CDI (see earlier in the thread), which is a commercial wench company that Snap-On bought so it should work as well as any other.
    #92
  13. meat popsicle

    meat popsicle Ignostic

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2004
    Oddometer:
    14,568
    Location:
    Circumlocution Office of Little Dorrit
    So I have a few more questions for the torque gurus (wherefore art thou Mack? :2cry ).

    So I torqued down my CS sprocket bolt last weekend and went a lil' overboard. I misread the specs and took the bolt up towards 75 ft.lbs; it should have been 44 ft.lbs - :doh

    My first question is this: now that I have overtorqued the fastener what should I do? I don't think sheared, but it probably stretched. Should I loosen it and reset the torque? Or should I leave it be until I have new hardware to use?

    My second question is I didn't notice if KTM specified lubricated or dry torque values. And since there is a big difference... is there a "default" that I should expect KTM to be implying based upon the omission?

    EDIT: So Loctite does work as a lubricant when tightening (Loaded said so earlier in the thread as well as numerous online sources); and I assume KTM's torque value with Loctite specified would be the "lubricated" value. Still looking for some help on the "what to do now" question above... :ear
    #93
  14. herobikes

    herobikes HE AINT HEAVY HES MY LC4

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2005
    Oddometer:
    207
    Location:
    DOVER , NEW HAMPSTER
    My elbow was calibrated by uncle sam as part of my Air Force maintenance training. Craftsman makes a decent 3/8 torque wrench , $50 or so.
    #94
  15. rapiti

    rapiti IOR Veteran

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2003
    Oddometer:
    1,963
    Location:
    On the island
    Mack, you are missed in so many ways.:(: :cry
    #95
  16. meat popsicle

    meat popsicle Ignostic

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2004
    Oddometer:
    14,568
    Location:
    Circumlocution Office of Little Dorrit
    Yeah, especially since NOBODY can answer my questions... :dunno

    So I noticed that the CS sprocket bolt had slipped a bit (thanks for the marking tip creeper), which prompted me to reset the bugger. It came off real easy again... :huh isn't this one supposed to be hard to get it to let go? Especially with 44 ft.lbs + of torque on it? So I reset it to 44 ft.lbs. I will order some new hardware just in case:

    59033034044 bolt/washer $4.16

    Man, I hate these mini orders...
    #96
  17. GODSPEED

    GODSPEED finger lickin' good

    Joined:
    May 29, 2003
    Oddometer:
    2,082
    Location:
    Port Angeles
  18. meat popsicle

    meat popsicle Ignostic

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2004
    Oddometer:
    14,568
    Location:
    Circumlocution Office of Little Dorrit
    #98
  19. herobikes

    herobikes HE AINT HEAVY HES MY LC4

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2005
    Oddometer:
    207
    Location:
    DOVER , NEW HAMPSTER
    I feel your pain , its the George Bush economy.
    #99
  20. vagt6

    vagt6 Bit the Bullet

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2005
    Oddometer:
    832
    Location:
    C'ville, VA
    http://www.toolsource.com/ost/product.asp?sourceid=NO+SOURCE&dept_id=500&pf_id=56268&mscssid=PJ1UAL1QAWUF8MPF3WDFGD9X66490B66

    Great thread, thanks for all the input.

    I've found a few 3/8" inch pound clickers at about this $100 price. I've seen them for less, but I'm reluctant to go for the cheapest for obvious reasons. I'm avoiding the 1/4" inchers because I don't really want to purchase a set of 1/4 sockets just for this wrench.

    Anyone else find inch pound torque wrenches in 3/8 size for similar or better, please chime in.