Toyota Tundra Tires

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by ozmoses, Aug 10, 2019.

  1. Stasher1

    Stasher1 Been here awhile

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    Based on my research, they were as wide as I could go on stock steel wheels without risking interference with my factory fender flares and mud flaps. It's a street truck, so I could've added spacers and gone wider...but it just wasn't worth the effort.
    #21
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  2. (I^2)R/746

    (I^2)R/746 Rider

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    So I've had three Tundra now. All double cab 4x4 with 6.5' bed. Last two the 5.7l first one the 4.7l motor. All with tow package. All used for construction work and specifically service and install of generators in the Santa Cruz Mountains. So I use the 4x4 and LSD. Tow gensets here and there. Up and down hills all the time. Combined total mileage about 250k miles. Some observations on tires:
    -Rotate every 5k miles or they will be trash.
    -Run 40 psi all around.
    -The stock ones suck. Trash by 30k.
    -Tried many gave up use BFG A/T KO2 get 50k miles then done.
    -Sometimes replace before 50k miles if winter is coming and they are 40k.

    Didn't mean to own three of them. Sold first to leverage interest rates and get out of debt faster. Second one was smashed by a car and totalled. Same lumber rack all three it's a custom job had it powdercoated last swap over. Very happy with these trucks for the price. I do the service on time every time and besides a couple small problems on the 2007 covered under warranty (first year model came out) I have had zero issues. No starters, alternators, u-joints, pumps, etc... Can't say that about some of the competition. Would love a diesel 3/4 truck but not at twice the price. If Toyota finally puts an Isuzu turbo diesel in a full size I might go for that.
    #22
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  3. ozmoses

    ozmoses . Supporter

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    BOOM!

    Bumping up to 40 psi is key,IMO- Toyota's recommendation is absurd.
    Yes, the stock Bridgestone Duelers may be among the worst tires ever spec'd.

    My only real complaint is 14mpg for a 1/2 ton- looks like that may be addressed in 2021 model:



    2021 Toyota Tundra rumored to get 3.5-liter twin-turbo V6 hybrid as top powertrain
    #23
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  4. Stasher1

    Stasher1 Been here awhile

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    This ^^^ is what I've been waiting on. I've had my '12 Tundra DC 5.7 since 2014, and will be ready for a replacement in/around 2023. Just in time to pick up a used twin-turbo 2021 or 2022 model. ;)
    #24
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  5. bmw345

    bmw345 Adventurer

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    Yep 22" wheels. Bought some well used 22" TRD Forged wheels and got them powder coated. Never seen any dirt yet. Has traveled a gravel road! LOL
    #25
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  6. kantuckid

    kantuckid Long timer

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    LTX comes in several load ranges-see my post or Michelin's chart. On an SUV or truck that never hauls, I'd go with a lower load range to have best handling and ride -plus they cost less! If your out to create a poser truck then go low profile tires or much larger wheels, otherwise keep it purposeful? Even wider tires are not always the better answer for truck tires. Not to mention the much added expense of "fancy" wheels on yer truck as mentioned here @ 22", yipes...
    #26
  7. Yooper_Bob

    Yooper_Bob Long timer

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    Falken Wildpeak A/T3W!!!

    These things are frickin' awesome! I have them on my 2011 Tundra Crewmax. Best tire I have ever run. Quiet/long lasting/great traction/great in the rain/incredible in the snow!

    I previously had a set of Nitto's that I thought were good...these are even better.

    Big plus...they are relatively inexpensive.

    [​IMG]
    #27
  8. mnmlst

    mnmlst mnmlst

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    On the Taco... I like ‘em. 3CB5DB7A-9AD4-46F0-9CAC-E4F844CF954B.jpeg

    64DDE28E-E9EA-408A-B9B8-66C8E524D5BE.jpeg B29F224F-1761-4F9F-8367-4A819E66B86F.jpeg
    #28
  9. DingDangKid

    DingDangKid El Lechero

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    Cooper Discovery S/T LT295/70/E17 on my Tundra.

    They’ve been a superb tire but do rub at full turn.
    #29
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  10. neanderthal

    neanderthal globeriding wannabe

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    In a nutshell.
    Load range A, B,C, D, E, etc are a metric based on the carrying capacity of a tire. Back in the day when a tire with more cotton plies was stronger than a tire with less plies. So the more plies it had, the higher its load capacity, but the quicker that same tire heated up. It was also generally heavier.

    Today however, tires have plies that are made of cotton, rayon, other fibers and materials, and some of those are stronger and lighter than cotton. (BTW, semi truck tires are often 4 ply. Next time you are parked next to one, or you happen to be walking past one, take a look. It's a 4 ply tire. So don't put too much credence in that "10 ply is the best tire" nonsense that people will often say. "Best how?" should be your response. ) On modern tires you don't ascribe too much to the Load Range metric, but by the load index.
    The load index is the number on the side of the tire that often comes right after the size and is usually embossed on the tire together with the speed range of the tire. IE 114R. where 114 is the load index.

    The load index is a much more accurate way of describing the tires load capacity. Any 2 tires with a 114 load range will should have the exact same load capacity. That isn't necessarily the case for Load range E tires. (just as an example.) That's because the tires load capacity mostly comes from the amount of air in it. So, in general, the bigger the tire, the higher it's load capacity. Same thing if it has a higher maximum pressure; the more air you can put in the tire, the higher the load capacity.

    So, you end up with specific examples where a Load range D tire, in a particular size has a higher load capacity than a smaller Load range E tire. And it shouldn't be that way, because everybody knows that a Load range E tire is a ten ply tire, and therefore has the best load capacity of all tires designed for light trucks.

    Here is a data page for the BFG All Terrain T/A KO.

    Look specifically at the LT245/75R16 load range E having a lower load index (120/116) than a 37/12.50R17 Load range D (124.) That's a good example of how a tire with a lower load range can actually have a higher load index. I picked a smaller tire and the first Load range D tire.

    I hope that clears things up a tiny bit.

    P rated tires are generally "passenger car" tires made in a truck size. They will generally be quieter, smoother, more fuel efficient etc than an LT rated tire. Don't buy the hogwash about the LT tires being better. "Better how?" should be your question. My sister, stay at home soccer mum that she is, doesn't need LT rated tires on her truck. If you tow or haul anything, then get the LT tires. If you don't, you're probably fine with the P tires. However, sometimes a vehicle will be really hard on tires if they're the P tires versus the LT tires. And this is why my (same) sister has the LT tires on her truck. Those Tahoes and Suburbans can chew up the "lower spec tires."
    #30
  11. Johnny Kilo

    Johnny Kilo Sumbeotch

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    Not Tundra but I have the Falkens on my 2018 4Runner and like them but I am only on about 7k miles with them. I had Goodyear Wrangler Duratracs on the FJ that I had prior and they were good. So good I put them on my F250. If I were pulling a lot of heavy loads in the F250, I don't think I would get the mileage out of them.

    Tires.....kind of like an oil discussion!

    John
    #31
  12. ozmoses

    ozmoses . Supporter

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    This:

    The only other vehicle I've purchased which came wearing P rated was a 3/4 ton GMC Savana; I thought that odd at the time.

    As I mentioned, the P rated make this Tundra ride like a.......Highlander.

    Unfortunately, it's a truck not an SUV.
    #32
  13. timebak

    timebak n00b

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    On my 2011 Tundra Crew Max 4x4, I'm running Cooper Discoverer S/T MAXX, LT275/65R20, Load Range E, on the stock Tundra 20" aluminum wheels. They are fantastic tires, and are 4 full years old and have over 45,000 miles on them and still have 1/4" to 5/16" of tread on them. I tow a 6500 lb GVW bumper pull travel trailer for 3K to 5K miles per year, sometimes more. And I drive on rough roads every day up here in the boonies of northern Missouri. I do a fair amount of off-roading with them on our farm all year and elsewhere during hunting season. They have excellent traction on dry and wet pavement compared to any other aggressive tread design that I've ever run. I rotate and balance them about once a year, whether they need it or not.

    These tires had a very aggressive tread pattern, but are now worn to the point that I'll be replacing them within the next month or so, due to approaching winter driving. Like I said earlier they have over 45,000 miles on them now, which is fantastic for a 4x4 that weighs a minimum of 6400 lbs as it is driven every day.

    This is my third set of them and they ALL have worn exceptionally well and exceptionally evenly. In addition, during the winter during ice and snow season and when running mud roads and washboard gravel roads, I let the air down to 18 to 20 PSI and don't worry about the beads unseating because they have a very effective bead-lock design. I normally run them at around 40 PSI on the highway and at 45 to 50 PSI when towing my travel trailer. I have air bags on the rear suspension, so when I'm hauling something that's really heavy or puts a large load on the receiver hitch, I'll inflate the air bags to 60 PSI and the tires up to 60 to 80 PSI as needed.

    P.S.: Something that really improved the ride of this truck (and several others that I've owned) is that I installed Bilstein 5100 Series gas shocks front and rear.

    20190828_200815.jpg 20190828_200830.jpg 20190828_200842.jpg 20190828_200914.jpg 20190828_200924.jpg
    #33
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  14. ozmoses

    ozmoses . Supporter

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    Great info. :thumb
    #34
  15. ozmoses

    ozmoses . Supporter

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    I will add that one reason an A/T tire has little appeal to me is that I have a "winter set-up": Yokohama iceGuard iG51v

    Best snow tires I have ever run in almost 4 decades of running them!
    #35
  16. Hollywood D

    Hollywood D Been here awhile

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    I put 10W-30 in my tires but others have had luck with 5W-30
    #36
  17. Johnny Kilo

    Johnny Kilo Sumbeotch

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    Canola Oil unless you need higher temps then maybe Peanut Oil!
    #37
  18. DingDangKid

    DingDangKid El Lechero

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    I have the same tires and Bilstein's as you.

    Just curious if you tires get a little squirelly on wet blacktop. The Tundra has a lot more power than my last vehicles but I always ran Goodyears AT's and never had traction control kick in.
    #38
  19. gratefulJED

    gratefulJED long strange tripper Supporter

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    My 2019 tundra. 8’ bed, came with Michelin ltx/at 275/65/18
    #39
  20. ssgmiddleton

    ssgmiddleton Adventurer

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    I don't have the truck anymor eso I can't load any pics but..I ran Firestone Destination A/T for a while and I really liked that tire. I had it all over the mountains of Colorado and New Mexico elk hunitng and I felt it was a good tire for wighway use and I got good mileage out of them. They have an E rating option depending on the size of tire you have. Might be an option for you
    #40
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