TPMS light giving me fits!

Discussion in 'GS Boxers' started by mtrdrms, Dec 1, 2011.

  1. Kdawg

    Kdawg Adventurer

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    This picture shows the units buttoned up with new CR2032 batteries and hot glue

    Attached Files:

    #21
  2. Kdawg

    Kdawg Adventurer

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    And the end result - just like a bought one! I used the GS911 to clear the codes, and span up the rear wheel on the centre stand and looked at the live values to ensure it was working. The front one being static took a little while longer to come good.:freaky

    Attached Files:

    #22
  3. mtrdrms

    mtrdrms Been here awhile

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    Thanks for posting this. Great ideas and another sturdy fix!
    #23
  4. GeorgeKingGeorge

    GeorgeKingGeorge Been here awhile

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    CR2032 batteries with solder tabs are available here:

    http://www.digikey.com/product-sear...ies-non-rechargeable-primary/394467?k=p668 nd

    I recommend going this route instead of attempting to solder directly to the battery. It is easy to damage the battery if you get too much heat and also easy to get a cold joint that is susceptible to failure if you don't have enough heat. Give the pain of tire mounting just to see if the sensors work, buying the correct batteries is well worth it in my opinion.

    I resealed the battery in the unit with standard 5-minute, 2-part epoxy.
    #24
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  5. The Opa

    The Opa experienced

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    Thanks very much to all who have figured this out and offered information. Mine have been working intermittently for quite some time. I have a 2015 R 1200 GS, with 63,200 miles on it as of today. I got some of the batteries from Digikey that @GeorgeKingGeorge posted above. Here's what it looked like.

    TPMS out of the wheel and on the bench with delicate electronic weapons tools near at hand.

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    I heated the existing epoxy stuff with a heat gun. This shot is after a good bit of the material had already been removed.

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    First incision on warmed up filler.


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    Now we can see the tab attached to the OEM battery.


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    After removing a good bit of the filler, I started prying the tab off the battery. A little bit at a time, both sides, both ends, and before you know it the tab pops free.


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    I left a good bit of the filler around the battery and pried it out. Twisting it a bit and prying the bottom (negative) tab off the same as the top. I was being gentle.


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    Didn't have enough hands to show the prying, twisting, knifing, tab removal on the bottom.

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    Straightened out the bottom tab and kind of 'bowed' it up so as to make good contact with the new battery.


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    Tested the old battery.

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    New battery in package from Digi-Key. Part # P668-ND.

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    New battery with tabs.

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    Tested new battery. It indicates 3.21 VDC.

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    I bent the bottom tab back on itself and lined it up with the tab in the TPMS. The filler I left in the unit made for a good tight fit. I did not solder the bottom tabs. I also bent the top (positive) tab back on itself then put the battery tab and the TPMS tab in contact with each other. I did put a spot of solder on the top tabs.


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    Then I filled the cavity with hot glue.

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    Just waiting for the glue to set up.


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    Then I took the wheels and new tires back to the tire mounting guy, put everything back on the bike and went to test it.

    Took 100 yds for the front tire to display tire pressure; took .6 mile for the rear to appear.

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    Once again, thanks to all who contributed so much that I believed I could do it too.

    Hope the pictures will be of some help to someone else.









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    #25
    lgb, overlander, ztrab and 4 others like this.
  6. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

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    Well done, and very nice pictorial! :thumb
    #26
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  7. ndmiller

    ndmiller Been here awhile

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    Did mine used permatex gasket maker to seal it up. 24hour cure, but I started at 8pm one night. Worked perfectly, just work slow and carefully and it almost seems to easy.
    #27
  8. Zone1Fire

    Zone1Fire Been here awhile

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    Your fuel economy is much better than mine.
    #28
  9. The Opa

    The Opa experienced

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    I don't ride much interstate highway. That fuel mileage suffers a bit when I go to California. You can't drive like a little old man on the freeway.
    #29
  10. Hopster

    Hopster Adventurer

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    I LOVE this post. Thanks so much. Just followed your steps and in a quarter mile my rear tire started to register. Amazon only sold the tabbed batteries in a packet of 10, so if anyone needs a battery I will gladly send you one. This post saved me a bunch of money (versus a new OEM unit).
    #30
  11. DJP

    DJP Davy

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    I was ready to spoon on some new Shinko 705's on my 08 1200GS and remembered that my rear TPS had quite working about a year ago and wanted to take care of it, hopefully without spending big bucks for replacement and without delaying my tire installation. A quick search and I found this thread, and pretty much followed The Opa's great pictorial (THANK YOU, Opa), and now have new batteries in both sensors and no annoying yellow triangle!
    I just used standard 2032 batteries from Rite Aid, and made sure the sensor tabs were bent to make a good wedged contact with the battery, and used hot glue to seal everything up. There was maybe an hour added to the tire change to do this.
    This is really easy, and should be doable by most of us, and saves both time and money!
    #31
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  12. The Opa

    The Opa experienced

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    OK, my battery replacements failed back in the summer.

    My takeaways, so far: 1 solder both sides of the battery; and 2 don't use hot glue. It doesn't seem to seal well.

    One of the batteries is stone dead flat. The other one (that sometimes would still work) is at 3.0.. V. The totally dead one seems to have let water (?) in. Condensation I guess.

    Since one of my replacement (chinese knockoff, although they are identical to OEM, including bmw in the wordage on them) is acting up from brand new; I may have to re-battery one of the failed units. Or maybe just clean the bolt up?




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    #32
  13. slowagain

    slowagain Been here awhile Supporter

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    Hijack. I'm going to look at a 2007 GSA. Has a bad wheel sensor. Can a person simply 'disconnnect' stuff so the dash lights don't light up or is it another black tape over the light thing like some of the idiot lights on an old K bike. I know it is supposed to be a good thing but (I can feel the barbs already).
    #33
  14. The Opa

    The Opa experienced

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    I think if they have TPMS sensors in the wheels, you will always have a warning triangle. Black tape.



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    #34
  15. The Opa

    The Opa experienced

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    Put another (2nd) new battery in one of my OEM sensors and replaced the faulty knockoff sensor. Works just like new again. Used some epoxy to seal it this time. Used the GS 911 and a EL-50448 to 'learn' the sensor. This worked with both the new and the rebuilt original.

    FWIW, one of the new chinese sensors worked properly from the outset. The other one never could get the readout close. With 37psi in the tire, it started out indicating 19psi and eventually got up to 26 psi indicated. These numbers result in a flashing RED warning triangle, most distracting. The GS 911 indicates the battery is good, so I believe this sensor is simply defective out of the box.

    The chinese e-bay site is sending a new replacement, they just don't want any bad reviews.

    The first time I replaced the batteries, all was well until we took off on our western ride this summer. I had used hot glue on those. I believe (no proof) that the extremely hot temperatures we had probably caused the glue to 'shrink' enough to allow the (unsoldered) contacts to separate, maybe arc, allow moisture (they both showed signs of rust). Upon removal of these units, the hot glue was simple to pry out intact. I have no idea if one could remove the epoxy when these batteries die.




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    #35
  16. socalnative

    socalnative Been here awhile

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    Slowagain, a dealer can disable the system so you no longer see the yellow triangle or see the blinking message. You can not just disconnect electrical parts and have the message go away. Such is technology. You could cover them up but you will lose the ability to see when other errors popup on the dash display or if there are other issues that trigger the yellow triangle.
    #36
  17. socalnative

    socalnative Been here awhile

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    The Opa, I have an original set of sensors from my 2007 gsa that I've changed the batteries in twice and still work. Both times I've used hot glue. I think theres a little luck in doing it and how well the battery or battery contacts hold up. It gets hot here and I don't think that high temps would effect the glues ability to hold. But who knows.
    I also have a second set of wheels with chinese made sensors and they have held up for 5 years and still going. It's hit or miss quality wise. The original BMW rear sensor's battery lasted less than 5 years.

    I'm just glad that there's a way to avoid buying $200+ sensors every 5 years just so I can monitor approximate tire air pressures.
    #37
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  18. The Opa

    The Opa experienced

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    Yes! Me too @socalnative . Mine is a '15 going on 80,000 miles.

    Glad to hear the hot glue worked. I considered going back with hot glue, considering that the first time I did not solder the bottom connection. My thought (first time around) was that the glue would hold the connection securely, since the battery had springy tabs. That did not work out. As I said, one of the batteries had 0 volts when I checked on removal. The other one still had 3.0 V, but the GS 911 indicated 'bad battery' (or some such). So if it still had operational voltage, it must not have been making connection.

    Since the way I did the job the first time did not last, I thought I should report here that so that others would have more info.

    I have come to like having the TPMS readout, even though approximate. Shoot, none of my air gauges agree one with another!

    As you rightly point out, Motorrad wants a little much for their sensors, so the ability to replace batteries is a big saving!




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    #38
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  19. RenatoM

    RenatoM Adventurer Supporter

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    Another successful TPMS repair. Thanks to all the guys for posting great info.

    I dug out almost completely the original black seal and soldered new leads on to the PC board. Like suggested I got a few batteries from Digi-Key with welded tabs. There should be a double sided tape between the battery and the PC board. Sealed everything back with black hot glue.

    The biggest job was taking the wheel and tire off to get to the sensor. The actual repair was quick.

    Attached Files:

    #39
  20. 18415

    18415 Been here awhile Supporter

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    DBCFB619-F884-4B2D-8680-33BF70833464.jpeg B186644E-FE4A-4484-B45B-859E8C5192B1.jpeg Awesome, awesome thread! While mounting a set of tires yesterday to my 19’ GSA I noticed the sensor is a different design now… Hopefully it will be as easy to hack as the previous one. It would have been way too convenient for BMW to have one with a replaceable battery…
    #40
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