Training Poll, What training have you received?

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by klaviator, Oct 28, 2021.

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What training have you recieved in your riding history?

  1. I taught myself

    12 vote(s)
    9.9%
  2. Friends taught me.

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. Formal training such as MSF.

    16 vote(s)
    13.2%
  4. Track Days, Track school, Gymkhana, Racing.

    4 vote(s)
    3.3%
  5. Reading about riding skills and practicing.

    4 vote(s)
    3.3%
  6. More than one of the above

    59 vote(s)
    48.8%
  7. All of the above.

    23 vote(s)
    19.0%
  8. Training? I don't need no stinking training!

    1 vote(s)
    0.8%
  9. Everything I need to know I read in Perfect Line.

    2 vote(s)
    1.7%
  1. klaviator

    klaviator Long timer Supporter

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    Since a recent poll had no correct answer for most of us I decided to create another poll. So how did you learn to ride and how have you improved your riding skills?
    #1
  2. klaviator

    klaviator Long timer Supporter

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    A friend showed my the basics but I basically taught myself to ride. I did read as much as I could on the subject. After about 4 years of riding I took the Navy's version of the MSF course. I ended up taking that a few more times as well as the ERC. I have taken the California Superbike school, spent some time on tracks, paved and motocross. I do Gymkhana as often as I can and of course get out on the road and practice as often as I can. I've been riding for over 40 years and plan on continuing to work on my skills up until the day I stop riding.
    #2
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  3. Geschift

    Geschift Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2006
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    Location:
    The Netherlands Langedijk
    We have got this very suitable dutch expression for that:

    IMG_2042.jpg

    Either during driving lessons, adv training, cirquit training, braking (slippery conditions) training, various advanced classes … all included “vallen & opstaan “ (and always try and keep smiling)
    #3
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  4. MATTY

    MATTY BORDER RAIDER

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2014
    Oddometer:
    8,012
    Location:
    England On the Scotish border
    My father showed me the basics as a kid starting three years old in 1961 on a chopped down mobylette moped. Went through Trials First Bike on road at 16 in january 1974 a 1963 Mobylette moped and in the June a 1973 a Yamaha FS1E(sixteener special). Passed My Bike Test 7 days after my 17th birthday on a Honda C50. Just went on from there, never had so much as a formal chat never mind any training. Travelled hundreds of thousands of milees on bikes UK Europe and New Zealand. had a few offs worst i hit a Ford transit van in 1978 on a Suzuki GS1000 1977. Van was driven by a drunk gypsy. Had a big off in Devon in the early 90s on a Honda XL500 forced off the road by a trailer that had come off a car travelling the opposite direction.
    Was once rammed at a junction Near Te rapa road Hamilton North island New Zealand On a Triumph T140 750 bonavile. , hit by a Woman in a Holden VH That would have been 1994. few Minor offs in ice etc hit two deer and missed a good few more. Could i learn from Training? Probably could, And i think if it had been readily available when i started, then i would probably have done it. I genuinely believe the big potentially life threatening events and the myriad of near misses would/ could not have had any different outcomes to what happened. but i guess i will never know for certain.
    #4
  5. JETalmage

    JETalmage Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2014
    Oddometer:
    1,223
    53 years of riding on-road and off-road on bikes ranging from Touring to Trials; most years putting more miles on bikes than on cars.

    JET
    #5
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  6. PeterTrocewicz

    PeterTrocewicz Long timer

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2009
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    Location:
    Kincardine Ontario
    I learned by reading. Riding courses were very few and far between in 1980. I think there was only one in the Province, and it was a long way away.
    #6
    klaviator likes this.
  7. runpet

    runpet Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2011
    Oddometer:
    696
    Location:
    Sconsin
    School of Hard Knocks here. I got the scars to prove it.

    Last 15 years more miles on bikes than cars also.
    #7
    Aj Mick likes this.
  8. r60man

    r60man Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2013
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    2,760
    Location:
    Centralish PA
    My father taught me when I was a wee lad. I was 5 or so on a Bronco mini bike. A lot of other stuff I learned myself over the years of racing, crashing, rinse and repeat. When I started to ride on the road my father said that I should take the MSF course. I thought that was a fine idea, but I said "you should take it with me". So we both took it. Honestly I do not think I learned anything new, but it was good to reinforce the good, and work on eliminating the bad habits.

    Years later I took the "advanced rider" course and that was fun too.
    #8
    klaviator likes this.
  9. Barry

    Barry Just Beastly

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2002
    Oddometer:
    10,643
    Location:
    Fredericksburg, Va.
    Riding, practice every time I ride to get better. Riding with those that are more accomplished than myself. Professional traning from pro riders... INVALUABLE. Take that whenever you can get it. Time with pros is priceless. Track Days... racing, riding off-road, racing hare scrambles... The time I was the single best rider in my life was when I was doing 2-4 track days/race events per month on a Supermoto (KTM 560 SMR). I was in the zone. I was a solid middle of the pack guy at best, wasn't gonna' win anything, but I was the best rider I've ever been at that point.

    Oh... and when I was racing I ran with the AllSports GP crowd. We had organized track events indoors on mini-supermotos (150cc or less) all winter, on a slick kart track. The talent there was DEEEEEP. I never modified my wife's TTR 125 until I made it to A group. That's the fastest group. Riding with those guys improved my riding immeasurably. We had pros and semi-pros show up, guys you saw on TV. Miss those events.
    #9
    klaviator likes this.
  10. Aj Mick

    Aj Mick Long timer

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,133
    Location:
    A South Pacific island
    At the age of 11, I had already been riding a bicycle for four years (self taught, copied friends) . My father showed me how to start and stop the Honda CT 90 he had recently bought to use on the farm. He got me to practice doing figure 8s, and left me to it. He came back a couple of minutes later, and chided me for not having got out of first gear. Having been used to riding single speed bicycles I didn’t realise the was more than one gear, and told him as much. So began my second one-minute motorcycle riding lesson, changing gear. That was my last motorcycle riding lesson. From then on it was the School of Hard Knocks, sometimes sorted by a bog or a bramble bush.

    Have muddled along for over 56 years now, using motorcycles as my main motor vehicle, riding more in more than a dozen countries, covering more than 500,000 km.
    #10
    klaviator likes this.
  11. BetterLateThanNever

    BetterLateThanNever Nice, until you're not.

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2014
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    3,217
    Location:
    Somewhere in Canada
    I remember reading somewhere that the way to keep your brain young isn't doing sudoku and crosswords and taking online courses, it's pursuing mastery at something. Something for which you can measure progress, there are some stakes involved, and there's no end. Riding scratches that itch for me, among so many others, and that's where training fits in for me. It's not a moral imperative. It makes me feel like a kid again.
    #11
  12. Big John Sny

    Big John Sny Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2009
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    2,615
    Location:
    Irving, Tx
    That is why I fell in love with formula 6 and 7 racing. The risk of injury is lower in crashes. I feel totally comfortable pushing my limits. If I was on a more expensive bike at higher speeds I would have a harder time pushing those limits if I had fear of crashing. At some point it would become a bit of going through the motions and not truly challenging myself every time to push a bit more or brake a bit later. There is still a couple of the faster corners I don't challenge myself on, but I also don't bounce as well as I did when I was younger :)
    #12
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  13. foxtrapper

    foxtrapper Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2011
    Oddometer:
    5,648
    Back in the Stone Age, we used to press wet plates against paper, leaving stains. We called it printing. I read a lot of it.

    Motorcycle magazines had articles about riding. How to do it, how to do things better. I’d read those articles. There were even some books you could find.

    I watched others, for good and bad. People who did things well, I’d try to emulate them and what they did. Others, I’d try hard *not* to emulate.

    I’d practice. Early on, I’d tear up my moms back yard, sliding and practicing. I got pretty good at some things, like sliding sideways and such. Learned how to stay in control when the rear slid around, and when it would snap back into line. Still take my bikes into the back field at times, just to slither.

    Years passed, MSF was sorta new, and they’d recently developed the advanced rider course. That was my first formal training. It was great fun!

    I’ve taken other classes over the years. Track, parking lots, etc.

    This all continues to this day. Sure, YouTube and the web have added a lot. Both for excellent training, and ever more examples of how I do not want to ride.

    I still practice. Every ride, I work on something. Might be line selection, or braking, maybe traffic reading or anti-fixation.

    With age has come some tempering. I’m not a fast rider, nor are my bikes. Never was fast, though I’ve had fast bikes. But today, I’m more comfortable with that. So it’s easier for me to ride within my own limits.
    #13
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  14. Gone in 60

    Gone in 60 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2013
    Oddometer:
    819
    Location:
    Orange County CA
    When I first started thinking about riding, I had a coworker who commuted on a bike. He said he'd only coach me if I took the MSF course. He said "You think you want to ride a motorcycle. Take the course, and you'll see if it's something you really want to do." Sure enough, during the course, there were two people who quit part way through, saying they had changed their mind about riding. But, I was hooked after the course. I bought my first bike with advice from my coworker, and he had me practice in the office parking lot, drilling on stopping, starting, tight turns, etc. before he'd let me go out on the street.
    #14
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  15. KingOfFleece

    KingOfFleece SplitWeight(tm) waterproof seat covers Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2010
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    Location:
    Western New York
    Self taught and over 40 years riding. Took the Stayin Safe riding weekend class and there was SO MUCH I didn't realize I didn't know I took it again 2 years later.
    It is focused on street riding and you'd never think there was so much to know-but there is. Now it's almost like I can predict what will happen before it does.
    Old timers used to tell me "ya gotta know what trouble looks like before it's trouble" and that's exactly what I learned.
    #15
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  16. Offcenter

    Offcenter On The Road Again!

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,312
    Location:
    Northern New Jersey
    When I started riding in '68, there was no such thing as rider training.
    I took my first bike, a Honda 90, out on the street and taught myself to ride it.
    Must have done something right. 52 years, 15 bikes and over 300,000 miles later I'm still riding and all in one piece.
    Currently riding a big Goldwing.
    #16
    KingOfFleece likes this.
  17. KingOfFleece

    KingOfFleece SplitWeight(tm) waterproof seat covers Supporter

    Joined:
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    Western New York
    I'm NOT saying your wrong-my experience is in the same ballpark. But i was amazed at what I didn't know. As they say, you don't know what you don't know.
    Example: when riders are just BSing around and someone says "ride like you're invisible" I'll ask (nicely-not condescending) what does that mean? What do you do specifically to "ride invisible"? I'm always up to learn more.
    #17
  18. jay547

    jay547 Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2011
    Oddometer:
    11,413
    Location:
    Broken Arrow, OK
    I went to the Guy Cooper motocross school in 1987.

    [​IMG]
    #18
  19. Motobillb

    Motobillb NorCal Fastfar Riders (meetup.com)

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2015
    Oddometer:
    177
    Location:
    Mountain View
    I didn’t grow up riding. My father didn’t ride and my mom was against it. So I was 58 yo when I got my first bike (Suzuki M80). I took the MSF course because the DMV m/c test here in CA was reputed to be very hard. With an MSF cert you don’t have to take the riding section of the test. After that I took a class with the local sheriff’s dept. After a couple of years I took a “cornering school” class with an ex-moto GP guy. Very helpful. Then I started getting into ADV/dirt stuff so I took a Rawhide off-Road (BMW) class, 2 off-road classes from Jimmy Lewis, and a flat track class from Rich Oliver. After 7 years, 6 bikes, about 200k riding miles, and 4 broken bones, I feel like I’m competent
    #19
    Mike Dirt likes this.
  20. rd400racer

    rd400racer Long timer

    Joined:
    May 14, 2013
    Oddometer:
    5,861
    Location:
    Louisville, Ky
    Only training I've had is the WERA racing school that everyone must take in order to race (although other schools will qualify you i.e., Ed Bargy etc). And it was mainly to teach race procedures, flags and such. I did read Twist of the Wrist and watched the videos. That's it.
    #20