Transamerica Trail 2009 - OCD or not to be.

Discussion in 'Americas' started by Questor, Dec 10, 2008.

  1. YnotJP?

    YnotJP? Long timer

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    It seems as if you know about backpack camping. The only difference is the distance between camp sites. If you don't want to carry it up the mountain on your back, you will not want to carry it on you bike. You do have the advantage of having two bikes to carry things. You will only need one of many items like tools, stove, roll of TP, etc.

    I say if not sure, leave it out, the TAT goes where you can get something sent to you if you have made a big mistake.

    Your right, the planning is a big part of the fun...

    Good Luck
    #41
  2. Leecifer

    Leecifer Just like to ride

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    #42
  3. Brent4ADV

    Brent4ADV Enjoying empty roads...

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    Go to the vendor forum and look for Alaska Leather (i think the title of the thread is "sheepskin buttpad discount"). Barb sells these pads and it saved my ass during my trip. A great improvement over stock for very little money.
    #43
  4. ThumperDRZ

    ThumperDRZ Bouncing off Rocks!

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    60CS(X) is the way to go....I've beat mine to shit and it comes back for more. If you use the Ram mount, it will tear up the bottom rubber sliding it in and out of the cradle....and ALWAYS use the tether.....eventally you'll find it dangling...or get the Touratech mount and call it a day....locks it up too. Make sure you power it off your motorcycle battery.

    As far as routing goes...screw the autoroute for a trip like that....on the road (which I'm sure you have found out on your trips) - sometimes Autoroute has a mind of it's own and can send you in a circle or get screwed up if you would have to detour. One wrong turn and you won't know if the GPS is sending you to the next point or circling you back to the one you just missed.

    Use the Tracks.....they never change and are constant. The 60 series has 20 track limit at 500 points each which will get you a long way....if a track has more then 500 points you can Filter it in the software and reduce to 500. For the whole TAT, you can dump different sections on extra Micro SD cards and swap them out on the trail.

    I actually run Autoroute and Tracks at the same time....that way it will tell me the Distance to Next with the Autorouting feature but then I get the stability of the tracks....it's a little more computer work though.
    #44
  5. Outwardbound

    Outwardbound Been here awhile Supporter

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    Having built multiple seats, I must recommend you avoid the aggregate carpet foam material. Seat comfort is all about shape rather than softness. Most long distance bicycle riders use hard leather Brooks saddles rather than the squishy gel seats. These achieve comfort because despite their hardness they conform to the shape of your behind thus removing pressure points. Horse saddles have no padding, and generally they're pretty comfortable. One of the most comfy seats I've ever ridden was a stamped steel tractor seat. No padding at all.

    If you decide to rebuild your seat, pick the hardest foam you can find. I like garden kneeling pads found at Home Depot. Use an electric kitchen knife to whittle the outside curves, then a hard wire brush wheel chucked into an electric drill to handle inside curvature. Test ride the seat (uncovered) for several hours and fine tune the shape until it's perfect. Patience is the key here. Cover it with 1/4 inch soft foam to disguise all the imperfections, then cover it with whatever you like.

    A comparo showing before and after using KRL250 seats
    [​IMG]

    I found that when the seat appeared too big and too poofy, it was just right. I just can't imagine any of the current butt-floss seats being comfortable even though they look cool.
    [​IMG]
    #45
  6. Questor

    Questor More Undestructable

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    Thanks for the advice YnotJP?.

    I've been looking at the gear list that Rider_grrl and I have been making, and actually, not much of the gear gets shared besides: Tent, Stove, Cookset.

    For nearly everything else, each rider will have their own stuff: Personal gear / clothing, foam pad, sleeping bag, food, plate / utensils, tools / tubes, and unique bike parts.

    So in fact, I'm thinking I'm only going to be "Saving" 1/2 a tent and 1/2 a cookset. :huh
    That's what, a total of 3 pounds and 1/6th a saddle bag worth of space?

    So where's this big "added benift" of splitting up gear?

    So again, it all boils down to - a minimal amount of lightweight gear.

    The heaviest items are going to be food, fuel, water, (and beer), and these items can be bought near the end of the day, so one would not be carrying them, or as much of them, throughout the day's actual riding.

    Q~
    #46
  7. MotoAdventureGal

    MotoAdventureGal Motorcycle Vagabond

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    **I'll** carry the TP!!!
    #47
  8. MotoAdventureGal

    MotoAdventureGal Motorcycle Vagabond

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    Wow. So much information, so little time. I'm not very adventurous when it comes to taking my stuff apart and re-doing it...but they make it look easy!

    What I'm especially excited about is discovering the KLR forum (thanks x 2) --I'm considering a KLR650 (or 800 GS) for the TAT trip.

    I know, I know, so hard to plan mods when I cannot even decide on which motorbike. I'm gathering information and just working on the other stuff that's not bike-dependent.

    Thanks for the links.
    #48
  9. Staxrider

    Staxrider dirt dauber

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    Very few stores on the trail.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    #49
  10. DR. Rock

    DR. Rock Part of the problem

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    Forget beer... weighs a ton, and tough to keep cold. Switch to hard liquor... bourbon or scotch... straight up, or with a splash. Also can be used to make DintyMoore stew a real meal, and turns Swiss Miss into a party.

    Also great as an antiseptic to clean out small wounds, and pretty good as a general anesthetic if you really get hurt. :lol3 Try that with beer.
    :freaky


    PS: Happy New Year, guys.
    #50
  11. DR. Rock

    DR. Rock Part of the problem

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    True, but... We found that we would pass somewhere near enough to a decent grocery store at least every other day, more like once a day. We'd try to figure if we needed to stock up, if it was still early in the day, it'd be ramen noodles, or something in a can, if it was later in the day, it would be perishables (fresh meat / salad fixin's, fruit). Only once did we get caught with neither (cowboy camping between Green River & Salida UT), and had to resort to our back-up freeze-dried backpacker meals. Can't speak for the TAT west of UT, as we haven't made it that far yet.
    #51
  12. Questor

    Questor More Undestructable

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    :photog:poser:D

    Q~
    #52
  13. Questor

    Questor More Undestructable

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    Yea, that's sorta what I was thinking...
    Grab a Sub sandwich in the last town of the day and take it to camp and have it with a bowl of soup or something.

    I've been going to the supermarket and trying different TAT "friendly" types of foods / meals.

    So far I'm a big fan of Lipton chicken noodle soup, and my famous "Egg in the hole" breakfast sandwiches.
    Want to know more? :wink:
    Q~
    #53
  14. MotoAdventureGal

    MotoAdventureGal Motorcycle Vagabond

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    Wow, that looks comfy! Will it fit on my DRZ?:rofl
    (Point taken about the hard vs. soft foam!)

    My original (and cheap-skate option) was just throwing a small sheepskin over the bench and letting that double as a hip-pad for ground sleeping (worked great crossing the country this summer, although I was on the GSA and could pack mega-crap!)
    #54
  15. MotoAdventureGal

    MotoAdventureGal Motorcycle Vagabond

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    I don't think I want to be on TAT trail!
    #55
  16. Seth S

    Seth S Deleted

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    cooking and the trail and me...hahahaha...yeah I had a camp stove with me and some fuel and I don't think I used it once. I carried water with me and snack food and fruit on occasion but I find I am not at all motivated to cook when on moto trips. I tended to hit up small restaurants or the salad bar at the local food store. My food cost for the trip was likely a little higher but I was well nourished. Some people get really extravigant with their cooking and thats great. of course I tend to get up later in the morning and then ride into the night.
    #56
  17. Brent4ADV

    Brent4ADV Enjoying empty roads...

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    I would disagree. Most of your tools will be universal between the bikes. Tire tools are the same, tire tubes, oil, sockets, allan wrenches. Not to mention you should consider using the same chain size on both bikes so if you have to do any kind of chain repair you don't need to double up on those items as well. Also, you can split up all the little odds and ends like tie wraps, jb weld, assorted spare hardware, med kit, etc.
    #57
  18. Questor

    Questor More Undestructable

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    Now that's the kind of good idea I was looking for!
    That had not occurred to me.
    That's why I love the ADV Collective. :clap

    Anyone else with clever insights that may benifit my travels and ease my mind? :rayof

    Q~
    #58
  19. Staxrider

    Staxrider dirt dauber

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    The really desolate parts are Western Utah, Nevada, and Eastern Oregon. From Lakeview, OR to Denio Junction, Nevada was 150 miles of sagebrush and cows. After that it's still sparse. I guess you need to figure out how many calories can you survive on but your main focus needs to be water and gas. Any mechanical issues in this section could lead to a really tragic situation as you would be stranded in an area that sees very little human traffic. After going through Oregon, Nevada, and Utah, Colorado seemed "crowded". :D
    #59
  20. DockingPilot

    DockingPilot Hooked Up and Hard Over

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    I agree with Stax, west of Green River Utah is where the TAT separates the men from the boys so to speak. All very interesting of course, but out there it gets down to business. You'll love it, just be prepared or you could have serious trouble or end up bailing out which would be a shame.
    #60