Trip Planning. What GPS??

Discussion in 'GPS 101 - Which GPS For Me' started by cafe that, Feb 20, 2019.

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  1. Tripped1

    Tripped1 Smoove, Smoove like velvet.

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    Takayama is traffic hell and its VERY hard to get in and out of, there is only one road from the east through Nagano-shi (city) and all of the Iwate/Gifu passes from the west don't open until June. Which leaves the toll roads north on the coast between Noto-honoto and the Chuo expressway or coming up from the south, from literally Shizuoka-shi.

    I was there last week. Routing that part of the country is a continual thorn in my side.
    #21
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  2. Tripped1

    Tripped1 Smoove, Smoove like velvet.

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    What have you got in mind? I live in Japan and have put two wheels on the ground in every prefecture not called Okinawa.

    4-5 Days isn't a lot for that spread unless you are toll roading it everywhere. I eat the tires off of the bike running 50km/h and Hiroshima and Fuji are no-where close to each other.
    #22
  3. cafe that

    cafe that Adventurer

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    Yeah, I've been doing some revising to my loosely planned route. I'll probably only make it as far south as Kobe, then cut up through Kyoto and circle back. I have a toll pass lined up, but hopefully I can avoid some of the toll roads. Where in Japan are you?
    #23
  4. Tripped1

    Tripped1 Smoove, Smoove like velvet.

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    Yokosuka, just south of Tokyo.

    Where are your starting and ending points?

    Because for trip planning let me tell you they are dog kilometers. There is exactly ONE highway in the country with a speed limit higher than 62mph, and that is the Shintomei between Toyota and Gotemba, the rest top out at 100km/h and even then a good deal of them are actually 70km/h one lane affairs that are incredibly annoying.

    Once you drop off of the highway 50km/h average is going pretty good. The roads in Japan are not like the US, a 12' lane is not assure in fact you may only get 12' and its two way traffic with site lines that measure in double digit numbers. What we would call a multi-use trail in the US, here that is a pretty much bog standard mountain road.

    So make sure you are Gmap scouting your ass off, being stuck on a dirty car wide single lane for 50 km means you aren't getting anywhere fast.
    #24
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  5. Tripped1

    Tripped1 Smoove, Smoove like velvet.

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    Japanese phrases, particularly on a bike.

    First and foremost

    Kudasai Kuu-da-SI. ...it means may I have please and if you can point at it and say kudasai, you are likely good.

    hai-octu (high octane)
    man-tan (full tank) this is how you order gas....which if you are out of the city, means its full service whether or not you like it.

    "Hai-octu, man-tan kudsai"

    At which point they will ask you cash or card.

    "Genkin, Cardo des ka?" Des ka is a question mark in Japanese, genkin (pronounced GANE-keen) means basically gold or cash....cardo, self explanatory, that is katakana Japanamated foreign words, in this case card.

    The response is genkin des, or cardo daijobu des ka? (its polite to ask if a card is ok)

    They will answer so or daijobu usually, or try your card to have it get rejected because its not from the two Japanese banks they accept (this is why you always carry cash).

    Bear in mind Japan isn't really an electronic economy, I usually have san-man en (30,000 yen ~300USD) on me at all times, because your card may or may not mean shit. IF you need yen 7-11, fun fact, the 7-11 you go to in the US is a Japanese subsidiary 1) they bought out the mothership in the 90s 2) you can live completely out of Japanese convience stores on the road for weeks (I do) 3) you are never going to look at American convince stores the same ever again.

    Domo.....which is slang for "your welcome" do'itachimatsute (say it like don't touch my moustache) but you can use that shit on everything. Greetings, farewells, here you go. Highly handy expression.

    Don't coffee, its cohee Japanese doesn't have an F sound.

    Beer is nama, which means fresh, and can be applied to a lot of things, but if you walk into an Izakaiya (pub) and you see a tap Ongashitsu (pronounced onee-gah-shimas) nama kudasai will at least get you that far.....whatever the draft beer is. Asahi (most likely) Kirin, or Saporo
    Sake is actually called nihon-chu
    #25
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  6. cafe that

    cafe that Adventurer

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    Wow. Thank you for all of this information. I'm going to print this out to take with me. As far as starting and ending points, Starting and ending in Tokyo. I don't have anything set, or have to be anywhere at a certain day or time. Giving myself complete freedom to do/go where looks interesting. I'm bringing plenty of cash. I'm down to meet up for a beer.
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  7. Tripped1

    Tripped1 Smoove, Smoove like velvet.

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    Feel free to ping me and let me know, my schedule is ...chaotic, but I will give it a shot.

    My wife and I travel much the same way I just got back from a trip where EVERY day ended in "ok babe, what the hell are we doing tomorrow?"......only two nights that had a defined start and end point, the first and the last.

    Oh fair warning, the west to east jet lag is intense, and the sun comes up around 5am just to make it that much harder to go back to sleep...which acually may be a good thing for you maximizing time on the hoof.
    #27