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Triumph Tiger 800

Discussion in 'Triumph Tigers' started by ScrambDaddy, Jul 12, 2010.

  1. ssevy

    ssevy retired and riding the backroads

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,822
    Location:
    Southern Adirondacks
    When I first got my bikes, I tried 3 brands of fully synthetic oil in them, based upon what was locally available. Any of the 3 would offer perfectly fine engine protection. Interestingly, each had a different effect on the ease of shifting. I finally settled on the one which shifted the way I liked, and have been happy for the past 70,000 miles.
    Based upon my experience, I would encourage you to try several until you find the one that works best for you.
    It may sound silly, but I also noticed that when I got a new pair of boots it affected my shifting until I got used to the different sensation of the thicker toe leather.
    akaDigger likes this.
  2. TxRoadDog

    TxRoadDog Shut up and ride

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2012
    Oddometer:
    988
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    El Tigre.

    Attached Files:

    khemist, Bugchewer, Don03st and 3 others like this.
  3. Rich B

    Rich B Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2010
    Oddometer:
    4,611
    Location:
    Stone Creek, OH
    Spent yesterday just exploring assorted back roads of Ohio. Goal was a lot of gravel. The Tiger just works so well on gravel. Found some killer roads. Was a long but enjoyable day

    a few pics.

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  4. TxRoadDog

    TxRoadDog Shut up and ride

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2012
    Oddometer:
    988
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    Where are you guys getting your centerstands for your XR's at? Logic tells me an XC center stand would work, but if they cell a center stand just for the XC, that obviously can't be so. Already need to do my 500mi service. Also, how much did your diagnostic tool from the dealer run you?
  5. KildareMan

    KildareMan Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,224
    Location:
    County Kildare, Ireland
    XR & XC stands are different. Xc is longer. Buy from triumph.
    You can't buy triumph's own diagnostic tool. You can buy "dealertool" (pc based), tune ECU (Android) or you can get free - tigertool (PC based. need to buy a cheap cable). see tiger800couk and search there
    TxRoadDog likes this.
  6. mylastbike

    mylastbike Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2014
    Oddometer:
    1,047
    Location:
    Savannah, GA
    TuneECU can be used via a PC too. I have it and DealerTool on my laptop. Note that they do different things.
  7. KildareMan

    KildareMan Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,224
    Location:
    County Kildare, Ireland
    Not sure for much longer. Not supported by tuneecu any more. I find the android version (bluetooth dongle or wired) a better experience to use. The dongle lives under the seat.
  8. TxRoadDog

    TxRoadDog Shut up and ride

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2012
    Oddometer:
    988
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    Ordered a C-stand from the dealer, as well as a shop manual, and a dealertool. Going to try to get my 500mi done next Monday and head out to Colorado on Tuesday.
  9. AloneInTheHills

    AloneInTheHills Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2019
    Oddometer:
    677
    Location:
    Nevada, USA
    The 500 mile should just be changing out the break in oil (you can do that on the side stand) and giving the bike a good look around to make sure everything looks to be tight for fasteners, ect. and nothing looks to be chafing or leaking. Also, check the free play on the clutch lever and lube the chain. So for parts it should be oil, filter, a crush washer (can be reused if needed). Your owner's manual will have the oil specs (I run 10W50 in hot weather). For torques my '17 sump drain plug is 25nm and the oil filter is 10nm. So that may help until you're fully setup with the service manual and tools to look at DTC codes. Also, on some years, codes can be displayed by holding the i button and up arrow then turning on the key.

    Enjoy the bike!
    TxRoadDog likes this.
  10. TxRoadDog

    TxRoadDog Shut up and ride

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2012
    Oddometer:
    988
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    Good info, thanks. I was wondering if I could check those codes without the tool at first.
  11. dinkydonuts

    dinkydonuts Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2015
    Oddometer:
    278
    Location:
    OK
    So it turns out the problem was my clutch cable was not in proper adjustment. About 4000 miles ago I installed a new Barnett clutch kit and a fresh cable so things finally wore down enough that I needed to adjust the cable slack.. All is well now.. which means I wasted an oil change but oh well now the bike is on full synthetic and shifting is nice and slick again.
    Flap Jack and Siorc like this.
  12. dinkydonuts

    dinkydonuts Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2015
    Oddometer:
    278
    Location:
    OK
    Question for you high mileage guys: Do your wheels still have the same metal valve stem from when the bike was new? Curious if these ever need the gaskets rebuilt or if changing out the entire body is warranted.
  13. MapMaster

    MapMaster Human Compass

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2008
    Oddometer:
    3,479
    Location:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    No idea as far as your question goes.
    But a bit of advice for such queries:
    Even though your sig line identifies a '13 Tiger 800 ABS' it would help if you identified your bike in the body of such queries. As I understand it, folks viewing posts from a smart phone will not see your sig line. And some viewing on a pc may have disabled viewing sig lines.
    And even having sig lines visible, I had a WTF moment deciphering your question because the XC runs tubed tires.

    Edit: And for those of you who have done so, I know you can convert the rear XC to run tubeless. :eatme
    :lol3
  14. dinkydonuts

    dinkydonuts Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2015
    Oddometer:
    278
    Location:
    OK
    It never occurred to me that the XC used a different valve stem. So yeah my question is for the roadie riders.

    BUT for the XC guys who went tubeless, what did you do for the valve stem? Use one of the cheap rubber ones or get the Triumph 90 degree one?
  15. AloneInTheHills

    AloneInTheHills Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2019
    Oddometer:
    677
    Location:
    Nevada, USA
    For the XC going tubeless I went with a Napa stem that allows you to use the stock hole size on a tubed rim (3/8?).

    The XR may use a larger hole in the rim. You can measure at the next tire change, but given it's just a rubber washer that seals it, I'd expect a long service life. Some XR models probably have the TPS sensor built in. With those the battery should fail before they leak. Some on this forum have opened them up and put a new battery in, but it's a bit of work if I recall.
  16. AwDang

    AwDang Enabler

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2014
    Oddometer:
    3,420
    Location:
    MABDR mile post 0
    2011, just shy of 70k on the original stems
  17. markbvt

    markbvt Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2007
    Oddometer:
    4,169
    Location:
    Georgia, Vermont (that's one town, not two states)
    The Outex kit I used to seal the rear wheel came with a valve stem. So I used that.

    --mark
  18. dinkydonuts

    dinkydonuts Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2015
    Oddometer:
    278
    Location:
    OK
    Installing new chain and sprockets this weekend. Can someone remind me of the trick for removing and installing the nut that goes on the front sprocket? It might have just been to press on the rear brake while torquing the nut either on or off.
  19. mylastbike

    mylastbike Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2014
    Oddometer:
    1,047
    Location:
    Savannah, GA
    Since I have cast wheels, I usually stick something through the wheel and across the top of the rear swingarm to keep the chain (and thereby sprocket) from turning. When removing the old chain I've also just wedged something between the chain and rear sprocket to stop chain movement. I have also done the rear brake method although that requires you to have access to both sides of the bike at once so if you are short arm'd it may be more difficult. I usually stand on the right side with my foot on the brake and reach across the bike to torque the nut.

    No matter what you do, make sure to loosen the front sprocket nut before touching your old chain. Don't make the mistake of cutting your old chain off then proceeding to try to remove the sprocket nut.
    dinkydonuts likes this.
  20. KildareMan

    KildareMan Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,224
    Location:
    County Kildare, Ireland
    To remove put the bike in top gear. I also use a wooden broom handle through the rear wheel. You need to knock back the bent sides of the tab washer then socket with a extension to break the torque and remove the nut.
    dinkydonuts likes this.