Triumph Trident - 2020s Sport-Classic Revival

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by Hamamelis, Aug 25, 2020.

  1. pjensen641

    pjensen641 Long timer Supporter

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    Certainly doesn't look retro to me. "Classically" style might be a better term for it. It seems Kawasaki, and to a lesser extent Yamaha, have really changes what people expect to see out of a naked bike. I really don't mind Yamaha's new styling (save for the faux air scoops), but good grief....Kawasaki lost me with the 2nd generation Z1000:puke2
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  2. JaySwear

    JaySwear Been here awhile

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    Looks about as "retro" as the BMW F900R or SV650 to me. Which is to say not at all. Still, I think it's a great looking bike!
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  3. LuciferMutt

    LuciferMutt Rides slow bike slow

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    Yep, "retro" anymore just means a round headlight. I guess the tank silhouette is more "classic" than you'd find on a modern roadster, but that's about it.
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  4. pitbull

    pitbull Long timer

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    I don't think it looks retro at all, I think it looks like the appropriate evolution of a classic motorcycle. It clearly looks modern in it's components and performance numbers, but without looking like a transformer and without the need to engage in the displacement war.
  5. Johann

    Johann Commuterus Tankslapperus

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    I think 80hp from a middleweight weighing in at 189kg is seriously in the fun zone performance wise to me. I´m not a fan of the styling at the back end but I think for the money it is very competitive and an interesting option. For the market it is aimed at I think Triumph have probably got the balance right. Most owners will probably upgrade the suspension at some point, the aftermarket will help to some extent with luggage/seat options if needed. Probably not a great choice if you do a lot of two up riding but there are other bikes available for that. Well done Triumph, at the very least they have made a bike that looks genuinely fun to ride at a good price.
  6. KildareMan

    KildareMan Long timer

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    And now a new MT07 which has to be the immediate sparing partner.
  7. Hamamelis

    Hamamelis Inmate

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    I feel like the average ADVRider forumite thinks a lot more about rear subframe utilities and rear fender design than the average buyer of this bike ever will, hahaha

    that said, I'd certainly love to see some kind of rear rack for this bike to open up light touring options (or perhaps a touring variant off the factory floor???) because I'm that rare millennial who a) seriously wants this bike if it's any good and b) would actually use it for touring if Triumph or the aftermarket notices the market niche for it

    though, with the Tiger 850 Sport on the horizon I may be scoping out that bike intently before pulling the trigger on anything eh
  8. TimmyTheHog

    TimmyTheHog Been here awhile

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    I had some hope......well, that got crushed majorly and back to the drawing board...literally...
  9. Gustavo

    Gustavo Motociclista Errante

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    Givi and others make racks for the Street Triple, I have no doubt that in a couple of months you will be at least able to buy a rack for a top case. I'd actually take just the rack and strap a waterproof bag across the passenger seat/rack, so it take up less space and the weight is better distributed over the rear axle.

    Gustavo
  10. mrbreeze

    mrbreeze I keep blowing down the road Supporter

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    and that would be sufficient for a weekend away if you aren't camping. I am old school and I have a hard time breaking away from the idea that I need to add luggage to everything. I have a GL1800 in the garage, but I still find myself looking at Givi, Shad, and others with an eye toward my DL650.

    Actually, at my age, I keep thinking I need to trailer the bike to where I want to ride it, so in that case all I would need is some place to carry a tire repair kit and rain gear. Lighter is righter.

    I like the new Trident. I think (hope) it's going to be big hit, but I don't think it will be replacing my DL650 anytime soon.
  11. c_m_shooter

    c_m_shooter Ninja Warrior Supporter

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    I think my current luggage and camping setup would fit the Trident just fine.

    1754543-1cd8b0029230761a0d7668638c2adfcd.jpg
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  12. LuciferMutt

    LuciferMutt Rides slow bike slow

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    The new MT-07 is very near as ugly as the new MT09. This trident is way better looking than the Yamahas, and that would sell it to me alone.
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  13. Gustavo

    Gustavo Motociclista Errante

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  14. RightChoice

    RightChoice Been here awhile

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    Looks aside (which I think are subjective anyway, and I personally think the MT-07 looks way better than the Trident FWIW), from what I see in the comparisons:

    Trident has traction control and better suspension

    MT-07 will have the Yammie reliability. (I have heard mixed reviews on Triumph reliability so I am not sure what to make of it)

    Aside from this, I do not see many differences. Tough for me to choose between the 2, as I want traction control and reliability, which is steering me toward MT-09 (which I think looks horrible; hoping it looks better in person).

    I a not sure if the Aprilia Tuono 660 will be considered a competitor in this class when it launches, or if that increased price point puts it in a different category.
  15. ilmothefinn

    ilmothefinn Last snail in the coffin

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    Well, let's see how it manages the Motorrad 50 000km langstreckentest - hope it will be in. If it doesn't blow the engine like the two consecutive 765's did, I would be sort of interested. Or maybe not interested but more believing it has needed reliability... Up to that any new Triumph is a question not answered for us. Anyhow, it is light. That is great. Torque figures should be seen, too.

    Oh, and looks about ok.
  16. Subito

    Subito Been here awhile

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    From what I’ve read, the valve check interval for the MT-07 is twice as long as the Trident (24K miles vs 12K miles).
  17. pjensen641

    pjensen641 Long timer Supporter

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    You sure....sounds like they are extending the service interval for these. I think they are talking 10K for the oil change, which, if so, I bet the valve interval is 20K.
  18. Subito

    Subito Been here awhile

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    Triumph specifies annual service requirements, regardless of mileage. Here’s how Triumph explained it in the Revzilla Trident preview:
    “Over a three-year service timeframe, the Trident requires the lowest level of workshop time in the category, with 8.3 total hours compared to a range of 11 hours to 15.8 hours total required by its closest competitors,” says Triumph. “This information is based on official service activity timings and includes: 600 miles first service, three annual services, fitting a full set of brake pads, a new chain and new sprocket, and one full brake fluid change.”

    You’ll notice they conspicuously omit any info on valve service intervals. The Street Triple is every 12K miles, so I’m not seeing why a Street Triple-based engine would go 20K miles between valve checks, but maybe your hunch is right...I don’t know. One thing I do know—there’s no way in hell I’d go 10,000 miles between oil changes on any motorcycle, especially a high-revving one with a wet clutch.
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  19. Gustavo

    Gustavo Motociclista Errante

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    The MT-07, like most Yamahas, has a 26K valve inspection inspection.

    The Trident has the basic service as listed above at 10K miles and valve clearance inspection/adjustment at 20K. They recommend using semi or fully synthetic oil, which is how the oil change interval can be pushed to 10K.

    Gustavo
  20. pjensen641

    pjensen641 Long timer Supporter

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    Yeah...That is sort of the cryptic verbiage I was thinking of. Don't know why they just don't say what the actual service intervals are. I also wonder if they are going to start defining what a dealer can charge for service? I agree....10K is hard to swallow on a relatively low stressed car engine. Triumph currently do 6K OCIs with the small block triple. In my experience, the valve checks are some of the more laborious. Better than my Ducati...no where near as good as my BMW or DR650.