ttrTY ??????

Discussion in 'Australia' started by LC8TY, Jun 11, 2009.

  1. LC8TY

    LC8TY must......find........fuel

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    I've got a new project on the go.

    The idea is to modify a little traily to do some very remote, long distance touring. At first I though the WR250R would be a perfect bike for the job but I reckon its best to keep thing simple ( ie - not fuel injected ). I had a look at at some second hand 400cc bikes but didn't find anything I liked.

    I decided it was best to go for a brand new bike, but which one?
    I had a chat to the local MC dealer in town ( Honda & Yamaha ) about the bikes the cattle stations use. They have the CRF 230 or the TTR250R and the dealer reckons the Yami puts up with the abuse from the ringers better than the Honda.

    So, today I picked up my new TTR project bike.

    [​IMG]

    First mod was the bash plate
    [​IMG]

    then a seat cover, its a loose fit and sould be perfect for stuffing a bit of extra foam in there.
    [​IMG]
    #1
  2. philth

    philth www.motorbikin.com.au

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    mate, i'm picking up a ttr next week
    funny how you lean toward something small after some time on a 950/990
    #2
  3. ozbikedude

    ozbikedude Long timer

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    ya but why????:huh :huh .:1drink
    #3
  4. LC8TY

    LC8TY must......find........fuel

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    Here's a couple of things about the TTR that make the bike perfect for the job.

    A reliable air cooled motor with 10,000 k service intervals and a electric leg.
    [​IMG]

    one of those old fashioned manual starters and a stainless header.
    [​IMG]

    steel frame and sub frame
    [​IMG]
    #4
  5. LC8TY

    LC8TY must......find........fuel

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    Thats alright mate. I've got plenty of good stuff to go on this little rocket.
    #5
  6. LC8TY

    LC8TY must......find........fuel

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    Yep, but the 990 S isn't for sale.

    More about using the right tool for the job.
    #6
  7. LC8TY

    LC8TY must......find........fuel

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    There is a good reason, I'll get to that later.
    #7
  8. LC8TY

    LC8TY must......find........fuel

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    I think the chunky indicators have to go
    [​IMG]
    #8
  9. ozbikedude

    ozbikedude Long timer

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    they look like a group buy between yammy and suzuki:1drink
    #9
  10. LC8TY

    LC8TY must......find........fuel

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    There is a few things about the bike that I'll try and improve.

    First is a complete front end swap out with YZ450 gear.
    [​IMG]

    get rid of the heavy glass headlight and fit some wind/GPS protection.
    [​IMG]

    longer foot pegs for comfort
    [​IMG]
    #10
  11. Bigem

    Bigem Long timer

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    Great choice. I sold mine last year to help fund other (bike) projects.

    Put a decent pipe on it too. Staintunes do not work on these things in my opinion. I put a Megacycle on mine and you could feel the power increase right off idle through the midrange and into the top end.

    Standard gearing is up the shit as well. They are geared for the moon. 15-48 makes a huge difference to acceleration and will still allow a top speed around 120ks.

    The TTR250 must be one of the best trail bikes ever manufactured. Its a shame Yamaha never did a 400cc version.

    A mate of mine went the 320cc route several years ago, huge horsepower lift made for an even better bike.

    Keeps us in the loop LC8TY, I'm keen to see how things go with the front end.
    #11
  12. LC8TY

    LC8TY must......find........fuel

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    Thanks Bigem

    I'll be looking for a "race pipe" for it once the bike is uncorked and run in.

    One of the reasons I went for the TTR is that the big bore kit is available from the states and doesn't seam to affect the realiability of the motor.
    If the stock motor wont pull when the bikes loaded with 50 ltrs of fuel then I'll go for the big bore.

    Don't worry, there will be plenty of updates on the progress.
    #12
  13. rhino_343

    rhino_343 Southern Explorer

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    Hey Tony this looks like it will be interesting... I loved my little TTR250, it was a great bike. Mate you have more irons in the fire than I do or is this something to do with your hire business? Gonna do a fleet of them??
    Cant wait to see the YZ front end on it and here how it fits up!
    :lurk
    #13
  14. LC8TY

    LC8TY must......find........fuel

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    G'day Rhino

    The hire bike thing is on hold for a while.

    The TTR project is about building a bike that can go the distance in remote areas without the worry of breakdowns and lack of fuel. I'm looking to ride some old stock routes and tracks and I don't know if they are passable. I might get half way through and have to turn around or take a major detour.

    The YZ front end should fit with some minor mods from what I've read on the net. A mate of mine rode a stock TTR in the Aus Safari in 07 and finished, he just fitted a RM front end and raced the Finke. Anythings possible :D
    #14
  15. nevgriff64

    nevgriff64 .

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    Subscribed and watching with interest.. :clap :thumb
    #15
  16. MacMan

    MacMan Been here awhile

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    I can vouch for:

    1. Removing bung from can end of header.
    2. Buzzing out the seam weld at head end of header.
    3. Match porting the intake manifold. The standard setup was very poor in mine.
    4. I have a TK pipe that is now about 9 years old. I dunno if they still make them as well as they did, but it's TOUGH. A little on the loud side for long rides.
    5. I ended up opening the lid of the airbox right up, and in spite of what Kirby et al found with the Sidetrack model fitted with a Staintune, I found it was better. I verified this by swapping in and out with a stock box and stock snorkels cut to different length. Power might have been down, but mid to top end response felt better.
    6. Somewhere I have the jetting changed to suit written down.
    7. 21L Acerbis XR tank works very well.
    8. Cable tie the kick starter up to the shock reservoir. I didn't and found it a nuisance because it would move around when standing. That, and I managed to bend it crashing once when the bike slid with the lever in the outward position.
    9. DEFINITELY REGREASE THE LINKAGE BEFORE IT GETS DIRTY. Mine was near dry in delivery.
    10. Rethal Jimmy Button bars are good for giants.
    11. I ran standard forks with 15wt oil, level raised about 10mm, but still would like heavier springs. With a full big tank the front end is massively inadequate - although you seem to be sorting that!
    Wish mine still looked like that!
    #16
  17. LC8TY

    LC8TY must......find........fuel

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    Thanks for the info MacMan

    If anyone else has some experiance with the TTR let us know about it.

    I have a 22ltr Acerbis tank on order, getting hard to find these days.
    #17
  18. Nitram

    Nitram Been here awhile

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    I sold my TTR 12 months ago for a DR650 and have regretted it quite a few times since. They are really bulletproof motor, and 'though stories are around about the starter motor gears giving trouble, mine was fine after 22,000km.

    The 21 litre Acerbis tank is exactly the same as the one they sell for XRs. A bit Fugly, but practical. Just need to make up some sturdy mount brackets (picture below) for the front. With that on, even with hard riding, you'll get around 400km which is plenty for anything I did (which was mostly multi-day trips with tents etc etc.)
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    The stock seat is pretty aweful from new and just gets worse as the foam settles. I'd be sending it off to John Morehouse for a comprehensive re-working.

    The stock back shock is crap. Too lightly sprung and under damped. The clicker at the bottom does nothing to help. I never had mine re-valved, but I did the 650's as soon as I got it (by Teknik out at Penrith), and the re-valving, plus a heavier spring transformed the back of the Suzuki, and I expect the TTR would do likewise.

    The forks too are very ordinary, and front would still be pogo-ing 30m after landing from a water jump. Again, I had plans to do a front end transplant but never got to it. I got some White Power USD forks from an '89 KTM300 which look to be the right length- they are still hanging up in the shed !

    I always dreamed of putting a big bore kit in, but never did. There were times when the lack of ticker was limiting (like on big rutted hills where it's nice to be able to go steadily, and grunt out of the ditches) but I was reluctant to do anything to mess with the reliability.
    [​IMG]

    Having said all that, the TTR is a pretty usefull bike right out of the box, and I hope you enjoy yours as much as I did mine.

    Cheers
    #18
  19. MacMan

    MacMan Been here awhile

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    [​IMG]

    I have to disagree about the rear shock. I think out of the box they are actually very good. We've had 3 TTRs and all have been fine. I had mine serviced for the first time just before this trip to Mallacoota in December 2008 where this pic was taken. Other than the oil being putrid, there were no issues with the shock after 30,000 km of commuting, trail riding and desert trips. I used to weigh 110kg ready to ride and never found the spring or damping wanting once it was set up properly.

    I also forgot to mention that I lifted the top end off at about 21,500km a few years back having cooked the valve stem seals in the desert. While the piston was still JUST in spec, I put in first oversize with fresh rings. However, while the head was off I cleaned up all the ports and the curves around the valve guides. This made a significant difference to rideability.

    I'd had a few medium speed whoopsies when the front pushed and let go and I was lusting after more power to make it easier to slide the back. I contemplated going big bore, but settled on the port job for longevity sakes. Turned out that with the improved mid to top end response it was easier to do exactly that.

    Also worth keeping an eye on the left hand footpeg mount on the frame. I tore mine out of the frame doing one of the Yamaha riding academy weekends. Admittedly the bike had a hard life before the failure, but the whole lot came out of the frame when doing drop offs from about 1m and doing the log hopping exercises. That pressed part of the frame wouldn't even be 2mm thick and once broken I could see signs of an old and rusty work hardened crack about 10mm long. Paid too much for a "reputable" welder recommended by a colleague to do a messy job of fixing it, but it's never been a problem again.

    Being 198cm high with dodgy knees, I first tried packing more foam under the seat cover, but it was still too soft. I built the seat in the pic myself using closed cell foam, a dremmel tool to do the fine inletting for the base and an angle grinder for the main shaping. Once the shape was established I softened it a little using 1" of open cell foam over the top and finished with gripper material bought in bulk. It looks rediculous, but then again so do I... It's now pretty much flat across the top and I don't sink in. I found it a huge help for sand riding, with far more between my knees than before and less of an angle on my knees when sitting. This means I am less tired after a day in the saddle, and it's easier to set up the levers for both sitting and standing.

    Looking forward to seeing what you come up with!
    #19
  20. jtb

    jtb Long timer

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    I've subscribed to this one! Looking forward to seeing the end product...:ricky
    #20