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Tube Tire Patching on the road...

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by BMW-K, Jul 13, 2007.

  1. BMW-K

    BMW-K F800GS FTW!

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    Nov 11, 2004
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    Hey All,

    I change my own R1200GS tires on a HF setup in the garage. No big deal. And plugging an RGS tire is no big deal as the tire doesn't even have to come off the bike.

    BUT!

    My wife has an F650GS - tube tires. Bleh. I tried doing a tire change and the super stiff bead just plain kicked my ass. And it dawned on me: The bead was so stinking tough to break how the hell am I supposed to patch a TUBE tire on the road?

    Anyone got any advice here on how to break the bead on the road and patch the tire? Or is there a simpler way I just don't know about?
    #1
  2. spanker

    spanker Lake City, FL

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    I have an '06 F650 GS as well and have heard that the rear, radial tire on these bikes are tough. I have always used a c-clamp and two small blocks of wood if I couldn't break the bead by carefully stomping on it. I am not thrilled with carrying a c-clamp either but you do what you have to. I am not going to buy a 40-dollar specialty tool to break a damn tire bead. I am gearing up for the TAT in Sept. and am pondering just what kind of tire irons I'm going to purchase. Motion Pro always has good stuff and they integrate a 24mm box-end wrench with a tire iron; that size will fit your wife's axle nut. http://www.motionpro.com/motorcycle/tools/t-6_combo_lever/
    #2
  3. Bigger Al

    Bigger Al Still a stupid tire guy Supporter

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    www.tyrepliers.com That'll take care of the bead breaker, and Motion Pro has some nice tire irons that won't break the bank. Add some glue, patches, and a small bottle of sopy water, and you're pretty much set. It's always a good idea to practice at home some, too. It sucks to have your first experience changing a tube-type tire be at night. In the rain.
    #3
  4. Nabucco

    Nabucco Enfant Terrible

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    Some good tirepliers will work - look for the one with hooks so you can hold them in place by hooking them to the spokes. about 3 will do. I've done a lot of tube changing on the road. The bead becomes progreessively easier to break - if you are reluctant to lug additional tools such as clamps etc; the weight of your foot (and everything connected to it) should be enough to break it.

    After you are back from your trip, make sure to put in a new tube. As I learned the hard way, glue dries out, eventually allows a pinhole leak that can result in a blow out.

    Good luck!!!
    #4
  5. ibafran

    ibafran villagidiot

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    some DS riders like 'slime' or other tire sealant in the tubes. it doesnt obviate puncture repair on the trail. but it is supposed to save one the inconvenience of small punctures.

    i leave the topic for the more experienced among us. i do not use a tire sealant.

    some adv riders bring a tube for the tubeless tire. if the tubeless sustains an un plugable/unpatchable slice, the tube is used.
    #5
  6. bananaman

    bananaman transcontimental

    Joined:
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    I just helped do this on Sunday, a week ago, about 100 miles north of Fairbanks, on The Haul Road. Another rider flatted and before he could stop he's also bent a few flat spots into his rim.

    You need 3 tire irons, a hammer, a patch kit, a pump, tons of grease, a long piece of webbing, some starter-fluid, and a match.

    Once the tire has flatted, it's easy to break the bead by jumping on it. Insert the tire irons and remove the tire. Patch it by smearing the hole with glue, lighting it on fire, blowing it out before the tire starts to smoke, and then apply the patch. It might take a while for the patch to adhere but it will. Pound the flat parts back to round and don't crack the rim. Use the tire irons to put the tire back on the rim. Grease up one side and get the bead as close to set as possible. Grease up the other side and pull the tire up as close as possible. Spray starter-fluid into the tire and then spray a line away from it so you can light it without blowing yourself up. If you're lucky, this will set the bead on both sides. Be careful because, seriously- there could be a nasty explosion. Also make sure your fingers aren't between the tire and the rim when you light it. Then inflate the tire and hope and hope and hope that the patch will hold and that the bead will set and hope and swear and probably inhale a few mosquitos. I don't know what to do with the webbing but you always need webbing so you might as well have it handy.

    But in the end- our patch didn't hold so if anyone wants a motorcyle, there was one in the woods about a hundred miles north of Fairbanks.
    #6
  7. Mattbastard

    Mattbastard Lazy ass

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    I'll take it!

    Nice first post BTW
    #7
  8. R_W

    R_W wannabe

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    well, you can send the wheels to Woody and he can seal them into tubeless jobs. then life is good.

    You can run a tube-type tire (the bead is a lot easier to break)

    or you can do the C clamp and tire irons. But carry spare tubes. It is a long enough process already, not including waiting for the glue to dry. Swap tubes and re-assemble the bike, then patch the old tube and let the glue dry until the next time you flat....
    #8
  9. boyscout

    boyscout sittin' down

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    Try this:
    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=50717

    With practice I can now change both tires (Avon Gripsters tubeless, run with tubes) in about an hour. I use three 8.5 inch Motion Pro steel levers. If you don't ride off-road the tubeless conversion may work but pay attention to the minimum tire pressure. I think it is around 36psi.
    #9
  10. BMW-K

    BMW-K F800GS FTW!

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    BoyScout - thanks for the link! I couldn't find it before - that's exactly what I was looking for.
    #10