Tubliss Long Term Review

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by n16ht5, Oct 5, 2012.

  1. n16ht5

    n16ht5 ride the night

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    #41
  2. dsauer

    dsauer Been here awhile

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    Bikes like my 800 GS have a 21" front tire, I think that's what hamiamham was referring to. I like to 90+ on the street, but don't think Tubliss would be the answer. I would love to eliminate the tube, but don't think it's an option.
    #42
  3. ShimrMoon

    ShimrMoon Been here awhile

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    From the sound of things, some folks are putting these in/on their street (mostly) bikes. I'm interested in a 2008-10 KLR and would use it for it's intended purpose of dual sport touring, more weighted to the street than the serious dirt stuff. This product sounds like a solution for those of us not wanting to screw around with tubes.

    Has anyone tried these on a KLR?
    #43
  4. Foot dragger

    Foot dragger singletracker

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    I recently picked up a 2014 300XCW,I was so amped to ride it I left the nice sharp new 13psi knobby on the rear wheel,how bad could it be?

    Cripes,as soon as I got into major log hopping,rock crawling,vertical granite steps I realized my error. My brain was telling me just go,it will climb anything!
    I was used to the Tubliss Trials tire climbing virtually anything and clocked a few nice crashes off various things with the knobby.

    That little bit of tirespin at just the wrong time can = failure.

    Tubliss settup goes on the new bike today.
    #44
  5. Foot dragger

    Foot dragger singletracker

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    The 17" rear wheel is a sticking point,as far as I know Tubliss isnt making 17" settups yet. Id like to run em on my DR as well.
    #45
  6. DYNOBOB

    DYNOBOB lucky dog Supporter

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    They'll work fine on the front of a KLR. I'm sure you know but keep in mind a failure of the high pressure Tubliss inner tube will result in a very sudden flat/loose tire. This is why they don't market them for street use (liability). That being said, the bead lock part of the Tubliss will not let that part of the tire move so you shouldn't loose the tire. I have them on both my dual sports and would do it again. The convenience factor of plug hole/inflate/go outweights the risk for me. IMO you have to accept some slow air loss with Tubliss.

    Here's some feedback I gave another forum...

    In Sept we did two weeks in CO&UT, almost all off-road. I've installed Tubliss on three of the bikes that made the trip. A few thoughts...
    -I've had no tire failures/problems on the trail. My Tubliss are all the new style and use one wrap on the spoke tape. I've had no problems at all with the high pressure tubes.
    -All required about 4oz of spoke weights opposite the rim lock and run down the road with no vibration problems.
    -The first front tire (oem) on my KLX held air perfectly, the new IRC TR8 (great tire,made in Japan) goes flat overnight. The high pressure tube is holding air fine. It's rear T63 never looses air
    -The first front on my Husky (also oem) would go flat after several days, the new Mich Desert Race holds air fine. The rear 908 never looses air.
    -The third bike lost air the first few days but after some riding started to hold air.
    -I cant prove it but I think it's important to take the bike for a ride after installing to get everything to seat properly. I did on the Husky, didn't on the KLX.

    .
    #46
    Lee1200 likes this.
  7. bmwglenn

    bmwglenn Adventurer

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    My 16 year old son rides a KLR 250 back and forth to school. He's ridden well over 10,000 miles on the road on the same set of street tires this school year. Top speed is 83 miles an hour. No issues whatsoever.
    #47
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  8. Drstimpy

    Drstimpy Been here awhile

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    There is a bicycle product called Stan's notubes that includes a very good liquid sealant. I use it in my MTB tires with good results. Looks like it would work well with tubliss system too for annoying small air leaks. Self repairs punctures too!
    #48
    Foot dragger likes this.
  9. team ftb

    team ftb Befuddled Adventurer

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    The annoying air leaks are not in the high pressure tube, but instead the air you pump up the tire ends up leaking out of the bead. So bad sometimes I can't get the bead to seal at all. It will work great for a few weeks then stops holding at all. Pump them up in the morning and by the time I unload the bikes from the truck it's flat. Very frustrating and I've been running them for three years.

    I went away on a 3 day singletrack ride and lost a hi pressure tube. First time that has happened to me.

    [​IMG]

    Good news is you can run the hi pressure tube flat and the tire flat without fear of the bead coming off. Very impressed when I had to ride for two hours like that. It would have been a nightmare with a normal tube. However I cannot recommend the practice as the Tubliss Rimlock wore out the valve hole in the rim to about 2 inches wide. This necessitated welding the hole back up and drilling a new hole. Also the Tubliss red liner was trashed.

    I love the performance of the system as it's the only thing to hook up well in the slick, wet, hard as concrete clay we have in Northern Thailand. However it has over the years been so unreliable I am starting to use tubes again.
    #49
  10. Drstimpy

    Drstimpy Been here awhile

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    Stan's will seal between the high pressure casing and bead IMHO.
    #50
  11. team ftb

    team ftb Befuddled Adventurer

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    I was going to mix up my own batch of sealant and try that next since Stan's and such is unavailable over here.

    I did try a can of Fix A Flat stuff and all that did was make the tire harder to change and did nothing for the leaking between the bead and rim.
    #51
  12. Drstimpy

    Drstimpy Been here awhile

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    Yep. Fix a flat gets ugly in there...
    #52
  13. YAHBO

    YAHBO Grip and rip since 1983

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    I have been running tUbliss on my KTM 500EXC throughout my odyssey through Baja as I type this. Before that, I ran them on my other set of wheels with Pirelli trials tires. (Trail riding in LI and New England)

    Had three punctures a couple days ago after I ran over some barbed wire that was buried in the sand as I pulled off the trail to take pics of my riding buddies.
    Plugged all three with the Stop and Go plug kit (wasn't able to order the Dynaplug kit in time, see: Vendors forum) and two held. The third was a larger tear and after plugging it was still leaking.

    Put a rope plug in and it flung out after an hour on the slab (100 degree heat plus 70 MPH) and tried another rope plug and that also got flung out. Examined the puncture site and decided to try another mushroom plug. That has been holding well. Although I am losing about 8 psi over the course of a day. Not bad considering there are four repairs to this tire. I am currently in San Jose del Cabo and have over 1000 miles to go. I do not plan on replacing the tire. (MEFO Explorer)

    The key to the tUbliss system in my opinion (I have installed three and extensively ridden on them) is the following:

    Watch the install video and read the directions twice before you pick up a tool
    Clean your wheels very well before anything
    Heat your wheels and the spoke tape up with a heat gun during the install
    Use a shitload of soapy water when you install the inner liner/bladder
    Take your time, don't force anything and be patient, don't be a ham fisted monkey
    Carefully spoon on your tires with a shitload of soapy water
    Don't panic if the system doesn't seat the first time, break the bead again and re-soap
    Be diligent about the inner bladder pressure, check before every ride
    Carry a quality plug kit
    Go rip

    Another tip is to run the green SLIME (or any sealant besides fix a flat) and the key to this is so the puncture is easily identified by the slime leaking out. You can clearly see your breach and where you need to repair without looking around for it or airing it up if you are way flat and listening for the leak. BIG time saver. As far as the Slime product actually "sealing" the puncture, that has not been my experience.
    #53
  14. FamilyRider

    FamilyRider Been here awhile

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    The install instructions have been updated since I did my first install. It now says not to use soapy water IF you plan on using a sealant. I guess the soap causes the sealant to not seal properly.

    I first tried Stan's mtn bike sealant, but it was too thin, in my opinion.

    Be sure you use a "tire" sealant and not a "tube" sealant. They are different.

    I now use Quadboss ATV/dirt bike sealant. It is much thicker and designed specifically for dirt bike tires. And it easily washes out when you change a tire.
    #54
  15. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad Former World's Foremost Authority Supporter

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    Search the Mountain bike forums for do it your self Stan's/Tubless brew http://forums.mtbr.com/29er-components/best-tubeless-brew-406115.html . Stan's is basically Latex, not rocket science. 10 years ago when I was endurance racing MTBs, I used a mix of Stan's and Slime at a mix of 1/3 Slime to 2/3 Stan's. The Slime has fibers that help heal (fill) holes. On soft MTB tires a cut tire could be fixed with Super Glue.
    #55
  16. ChasM

    ChasM Been here awhile

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    Rather than using soapy water, I have had better results using copious slatherings of slime as the only lubricant for Tubliss and tire installation. I am certain that it provides for better sealing between the Tubliss system and the tire beads.
    #56
  17. DYNOBOB

    DYNOBOB lucky dog Supporter

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    A couple things I'll add if you're considering Tubliss.

    It's probably been said already, but carry a 21" tube in case you have a un-fixable failure of the Tubliss.

    Best way I've found to manage the high pressure tubes: Gauge them before a trip when you're at your 110psi air source (to confirm they haven't lost significant air). Top them up and don't mess with them on the trail, you'll loose 10-20psi just checking their pressure. Make sure cores are tight and use metal caps with a seal.


    .
    #57
  18. YAHBO

    YAHBO Grip and rip since 1983

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    I will try that next time.
    #58
  19. PhiSig1071

    PhiSig1071 What's ******width?

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    OK, I have the tubliss system in my DRZ and I love it. I run a MX71 front and a D739 rear. I am really happy with the tires and the tubliss system. I can air down my rear and get crazy amounts of traction (even in the shale crap we deal with sometimes) and the D739 is hard enough it doesn't wear out quickly.

    I am planning on a CDR trip this summer, and I had a question, for those of you who do multi-day trips on a tubliss equipped bike, what do you do about keeping the tubliss system aired up? A day or two, or even a four day weekend I probably wouldn't mess with it, but I'm looking at a three week five thousand mile trip away from my trusty craftsman compressor.

    I can't seem to find a compact 12v compressor that will go that high, so right now I am thinking about finding a high quality bicycle hand pump and trying it out.
    #59
  20. kdennan

    kdennan Been here awhile

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    Get the Topeak mini morph pump
    It has a little fold out foot stand and goes up to 160psi
    And it's the fastest little pump I've ever had.
    #60