Tubliss Long Term Review

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by n16ht5, Oct 5, 2012.

  1. Takataka

    Takataka Been here awhile

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    I would tend to be more concerned about keeping the pressure up on the road than offroad. If you go hard into a corner or hit a bit of a bump in a corner, deforming of the tyre might burp out air which could result in an instant flat tyre.

    It's just a theory (and might not ever happen that way) but I want the air to be securely contained in my tyres when running at speed on the road. In the dirt it's not so dangerous if you get an instant failure.
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  2. braindead0

    braindead0 Head Fisherman

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    they really need to do a better job of keeping documentation/marketing materials up to date. The images on their site still say 100PSI.. and I suspect their installation materials still say 110 or maybe even 100 in cases.
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  3. miksu

    miksu Been here awhile

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    Continuation to this, I mounted the t-lock concept with a continental tube size markings 32/47-406/451. The real size somewhere between 406 and 451 and not ideal, too small to really get it to stay inside the high pressure tube. I managed to mount it just fine anyway but it does not have the tubliss rim lock which might complicate things.

    I could not find a right size tube with a schrader valve, so the only option really is tubliss or t-lock spare. However, out of curiosity I took a schrader valve out of a broken tube and fixed it over the standard bicycle dunlop. Works fine, 0,5mm wall, epoxy to seal and a hydraulic connector crimping machine to finish the job :D

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  4. AdvNener

    AdvNener Long timer

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    Hi there,

    I'm installing tubliss on the mighty WRX. So far things went quite smoothly for a first install. I had to use 140g of spoke weights to balance the front wheel, which seemed a lot (never used rim locks before), but a quick search shows it's quite common. Not done the rear yet, but considering the size of the rim lock, i guess it can be even more than the front. I will be using sealant in the tires, so will it help and is it ok to not completely balance the rear wheel (if like 200+ g are needed this starts to be silly...)? I know you don't really feel an unbalanced rear wheel when riding(not like the front), but i guess it's still bad for wheel bearings.

    The bike will see some 110kph road rides.
  5. Yinzer Moto

    Yinzer Moto Sloppy 300 rider Supporter

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    Some people don't bother with balancing. I like to get them balanced as much as possible. I think an out of balance wheel/tire can contribute to fatigue over long distances. It also can wear out suspension components.
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  6. trc.rhubarb

    trc.rhubarb ZoomSplat!

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    I'm in the balance crowd as well. It drives me nuts to feel the bounce and it wears tires and components out quickly.
    If your riding is mostly done at 80kph and less, it may not matter. 100+ and you will wish it was.

    Instead of crazy expensive spoke weights, consider going 'old school' an wrapping heavy gauge (lead free if your environmentally conscious) solder around the spokes. It's very inexpensive.
    AdvNener and PoleRbear like this.
  7. braindead0

    braindead0 Head Fisherman

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    I put on spoke weights, AND used some strip weights to finish off. I doubt I'd balance at each tire change so the expense for me was one time (unless I lose some). I'm geared down a bit (13/48), rarely ride over 50mph or so..
  8. WRW9751

    WRW9751 7th Day Adventurist

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  9. braindead0

    braindead0 Head Fisherman

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    ?? Sounds like snake oil, to be a wheel weight.. the weight has to balance out... they don't mention any weight just this vacuous claim

    "it is the correct weight to balance the wheel if you are using a tube and the stock rim lock."

    They further 'elaborate' on that with this "These are designed specifically for the 2012-17 KTM and Husqvarna rim design"

    Sounds like the wrong idea to me, and not likely to be correct for a tubliss setup on any bike.
  10. WRW9751

    WRW9751 7th Day Adventurist

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    Actually they are measured to the weight of the average valve stem and rim lock. You still have to fine tune the balance. Who wants to start with a bag of NoMar's? They simply take the first 2.? ounces off the top. He has several YouTube videos on his products. I'm not trying to promote anything he makes. I do use several of his products and found them to be helpful and well thought out!
  11. Sitheach86

    Sitheach86 Long timer

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    There's a guy in vendor section with spoke weights that are reusable. It took so much weight to balance I feel doing without is not a good idea.
  12. AdvNener

    AdvNener Long timer

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    Thanks for all the responses.
    In the end the rear wheel needed "only" 130g. The tire had a paint mark that i placed opposed to the rim lock, it seemed to help a bit. Btw i'm using reusable spoke weights *relatively* cheap from china (300g set for 30$: was just enough). Used thread locker on the small screws, but i'm grateful for the heavy solder wire trick, i'm sure i'll do that once i've lost a few weights in the wild.

    Can't say much about the tubliss right now. I went for a very short ride as my tank is near empty and the gas station just closed as i came by. Running mt43 front/rear at 12/13 psi for a start, the front seems a bit squirmy at speed but again the ride was really short (new tire, relatively low pressure, sealant maybe not perfectly spread yet, rear end raised because of the fat rear tire...), i'll see how this goes.

    I'm *lucky* enough to have a very bad not maintained street right in front of my garage, with 10cm tall bump and holes, and i can tell the mt43+tubliss setup makes it really more plush. Can't wait to ride rocky stuff (hopefully on sunday).
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  13. trc.rhubarb

    trc.rhubarb ZoomSplat!

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    That sounds about right for balancing. For standard rimlocks - the regular, not ultra lights, rear is about 85g and front is about 56g on a 21/18 setup + whatever it takes to balance the rim and tire.
    The MT43's balance really nicely although I've not run one on the front before. I find 16 or so is a good pressure for me on the street but have run as low as 10 for very long distances with no issues... just less precise handling.
  14. CSpringsRider

    CSpringsRider Been here awhile

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    I did my first Tubliss install today and have a question. The rear install was straightforward and went pretty easily. The front install was really, really hard. For the life of me, could not get the final 6-8" of the second bead over the rim. Finally enlisted the help of my buddy and with two of us muscling the tire levers, we managed to get the bead over the edge. Tires are the stock ones on my 2018 Beta 300RR. Michelin Endure Competition MS on the front; Michelin Endure Competition VI on the back.

    What am I missing/ what was wrong in the approach that made it so difficult? Would 4 or 5 C clamps help to hold the tire bead together and increase the odds of it being in the center well?

    Thanks!
  15. Lutz

    Lutz Fuzzy Rabbit

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    No c-clamps (at least the way I'm envisioning). You don't want to sandwich both beads and the tubliss together, nothing is going to go into the drop center that way.

    A Bead Buddy or two might help you, though.

    There's not much room in the drop center with the Tubliss, but you still just need to push the bead of the tire on the side you're working on down into the drop center, for as far around the tire as you can. And take small bites when working the bead over the rim. If you're doing it right (standard tube or Tubliss install), two 8" tire irons is more than enough, and you should never need much muscle, even with short irons.
  16. braindead0

    braindead0 Head Fisherman

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    I've used bar clamps at a slight angle to hold the bead I'm working on into the drop center... sometimes that helps. And as @Lutz said, small bites.
  17. Yard Sale

    Yard Sale let's be bad guys

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    At that point it's just a normal tire install. I had the same trouble with the last front tire I did and I scratched my rim up plenty. Get the opposite side down into the rim.
  18. Yinzer Moto

    Yinzer Moto Sloppy 300 rider Supporter

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    I had some bad tire luck recently. 4 flats in 4 rides. Tubliss made it easier to deal with.

    1) Last weekend on the dirtbike ride. We jumped out on the road for a minute to connect some trails. I noticed my rear was flat. That was not a good place for that to happen because none of our bikes are truly street legal. I was able to continue for a while until we got to a good spot to do the repair. It was a pretty big sidewall cut. A couple tire plugs fixed it up. I was going again in a few min. The bike is sitting in the garage, 10 days later and it is still holding air. I'll probably change that tomorrow to get ready for this Sunday's ride.

    2) Dual sport ride on Friday. I got a front flat. One tire plug got that going. I changed that tire as soon as I got back because we were riding 2 more days. That front tire was pretty worn and I had brought a spare to put on, so the timing was good.

    3) Saturday dual sport ride. Rear flat, sidewall cut. This one was big. It took 2 plugs to fix. It held great for 50+ miles of extremely rocky trail.

    4) Sunday dual sport ride. The plugged rear was slightly low but looked to be holding. I aired it up pretty high, this ride was going to be asphalt and nice gravel road ride. After 40 miles we stopped for lunch and when we came back out it was flat. I just shot a CO2 in it and kept going. It was flat again in 20 miles. Another shot and it lasted 10 miles. I was 10 miles from the truck and out of CO2. I just said "F this tire" and motored on. 55mph on asphalt and it held fine. The rear was a little loose but totally rideable.

    In the end, I need to stock back up on CO2 cartridges and tire plugs. I don't know if there is any way to tell if I would have gotten the flats if I had tubes in there or if the punctures were superficial. What I do know is the tubliss made the repairs quick and easy.
    ChasM, CSpringsRider, kwb377 and 3 others like this.
  19. rastawheel

    rastawheel Pittsburgh, PA

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    Thats what happens when you run those old blown out used tires.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
  20. Yinzer Moto

    Yinzer Moto Sloppy 300 rider Supporter

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    I don’t know what “Green Fleece” was talking about. The rear on the dirt bike was only a few rides old. The rear on the dual sport was only slightly older. I can’t wait for him to get a flat on a 2 ride old tire so I can give him shit for running an “old” tire.
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