Tubliss Long Term Review

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by n16ht5, Oct 5, 2012.

  1. AdvNener

    AdvNener Long timer

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    I have some that look like those motion pro but with a lip on the curved size, that helps not going to far in the rim

    [​IMG]
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  2. team ftb

    team ftb Befuddled Adventurer

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    I've been running Tubliss for more than about 5 years. Started with first generation. I ride with them on two bikes; a couple days per week on my endure bike, and also use them on my KTM 500 for DS riding once or twice per month.

    I've never had problems with my hi pressure bladders until this year. I've kept the bladders in the tires for about three years with no issues. Then within a week both bladders tore at the valve stem. Weird. I run them with zero PSI most days in rainy season when we have a preponderance of slick hard clay. Then when it dries out,back to 5 PSI rear and depending on tire 7 -10 PSI front. I prefer stiff sidewall tires over the Pirellis and Mitas E07 gummy tires I've tried.

    I tested my tires to find out at what PSI the seal breaks and can't hold air. On a variety of tires it's about 80 PSI. They last a few weeks without topping up for me.

    The whole benefit of Tubliss is running the knobs at low psi for traction. I encourage new users not doing this to air down under 10 PSI depending on tires and laugh at loud as you get traction in the slipperiest of conditions. No reason for a trials tire at all, unless trail erosion is your concern.
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  3. NoelJ

    NoelJ Been here awhile

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    That is a weird failure mode - any chance your air compressor is not achieving full pressure, and the bead lock function failed and allowed slipping? I suppose the rim lock itself should prevent that, but two in one week.....
  4. dstutz

    dstutz Long timer

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    Ok guys...seems like that motion pro style with the little lips is definitely the way to go. Thanks a lot!

    So....my 701 isn't a lightweight (340-350 wet?) and neither am I (295 this morning) would you still say it's ok to run that low in my case? I know Tubliss provides rim protection even with 0 psi in the tire, but I've seen pictures of dented rims nonetheless.
  5. AdvNener

    AdvNener Long timer

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    I suppose adjust to conditions, speed and tires used. I've run well under 10 psi front&rear on my wr250r loaded for a trip (so not that light), on rocky terrain, with mt43 tires. But I'm slow :).
    I know low pressure is usually used for mudfest and all (avoid spinning etc), but (again, for me) on rocks/roots etc it also helps keeping the wheels not jumping and deflecting around, a lot.

    Try by decreasing small amounts first, what kind of pressure are you comfortable with right now?
  6. Rob578

    Rob578 Long timer Supporter

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    After changing both front and rear this past weekend and having a good assortment of tire irons, my favorite for the tubliss are the amazon type ones with the rounded edges, I have the 18" heavy duty ones. I also have both styles of the motion pro's. The long black ones will bend and the shorter ones don't have enough leverage and are very hard to get under the bead. The narrow ones are tough on the bead and the rims. I'm changing these on the garage floor by myself and with the tubliss it's extremely hard to press the opposite side bead into the center of the tire so it takes some pretty good leverage for the last 6".
  7. shrederscott

    shrederscott Long timer

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    HI

    If you buy 2 or 3 of the motion pro bead buddy tool you will find they press the opposite side into center of rim to make install easier ...

    Hope that helps

    Scott
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  8. Rob578

    Rob578 Long timer Supporter

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    They would, but I've got a couple of big C clamps that do the trick.
  9. dstutz

    dstutz Long timer

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    I guess I've been lucky or my wider rims give me more room than most of you. I really had no trouble getting the stock TKC-80s off or the GT723s on. I did the Front on-off-on and the rear on once at install and a couple days ago I replaced the rear so again taking off and putting on another GT723 was really low effort.
  10. braindead0

    braindead0 Head Fisherman

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    I've tried bead buddies, find a clamp on the tire and opposite rim works much better...
  11. team ftb

    team ftb Befuddled Adventurer

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    Great question. Last month I was testing my fuel pump on another KTM. The gauge read that it was delivering low fuel pressure. A friend that works in the ROV industry said if he had a nickel for every gauge that read wrong he would be a millionaire. I took his advice purchased another gauge and it gave a completely different reading. Lesson learned. I then went out and tested my air pressure gauge on the air compressor. I utilized a gauge that read similar to my oil field motion Pro gauge. It confirmed my air compressor gauge was pretty accurate within 2%.

    Though I did indeed check my air compressor gauge , great logical thinking in pointing out it could be a a compressor gauge failure. Thank you.

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  12. team ftb

    team ftb Befuddled Adventurer

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    Your chances of denting rims with the tubeless system, is a lot less than with traditional tubes. Of course your weight will increase those odds. The whole reason for the tubeless system is to increase traction. If that is something you want to try and improve by all means dropped the pressures and determine if the benefit is worth it for you. Over here we have slick clay in rainy season and nothing bites on it at all. Unless you're running 5 PSI or even less. It really depends on the conditions and your riding Terrain how big a difference the traction will make. Drop it down, ride it through some sections that you would like to see some improvement in traction and make a determination whether it's worth it or not.



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  13. dstutz

    dstutz Long timer

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    Fair enough. I have a 15-20 acre section of woods, partly mine and partly neighbor's property, I can ride in and the soil is clay so that is pretty much always slippery. I can tool around in there slowly with 0 in the rear and get a feel.
  14. team ftb

    team ftb Befuddled Adventurer

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    Dstutz what pressure do you normally run your tires at?

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  15. dstutz

    dstutz Long timer

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    Normally...street pressure. Dirt/gravel/sand, I've not gone below 15/15.
  16. braindead0

    braindead0 Head Fisherman

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    My XRL, tubeliss front/rear with kenda parker DT tires feels like it's riding on ball bearings on groomed gravel roads at any pressure above 10psi or so. I run 6-7 for most two track/rocky stuff... lots of sand/loose gravel I'll drop down to 5 or so. I've been down to 2psi and haven't noticed any improvement from 5 however around here it's usually shorter stretches of sand (unless you go looking for it).
  17. team ftb

    team ftb Befuddled Adventurer

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    Definitely get over to your slick hard pack clay. Take a decent tire gauge with you that gives you repeatable consistent pressure readings. In the garage I prefer my Motion Pro oil-filled gauge that Max out at 30 PSI. Recently I found this gauge.

    When matching the readings of this gauge up to my motion Pro they are identical readings. It has the capacity also to read up to 250 psi so I use it for my high pressure bladder as well. For a tiny unit it has proven very reliable and more importantly consistent when measured against the high-end gauge like the Motion Pro.

    A small road bike hand pump allows you to fine-tune the pressures in the field.

    I would recommend starting off at 10, then dropping it to 7, then four and see how you feel about the changes in traction. What I run in my tires depends on the tire sidewall Construction . On softer tires like my mitas e07 green stripe hardcore Enduro Tire I will run between 3 and 5 because it has a very soft side wall meant to grip over rocks and roots. On my stiff tires used on my dual sport bike like Motoz or my Dunlop 752 copy they sell over here in Thailand I will run zero PSI. Keep in mind the front tire I always maintain a little higher pressure then the rear so the front tire doesn't roll as much in corners and lose grip. Typically between 7 and 10 psi depending on sidewall Construction.

    Best of luck with your experimentation.[​IMG]

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  18. dstutz

    dstutz Long timer

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    Thanks for the advice!
  19. Tizzle

    Tizzle Workin' on it...

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    Where did you get these?

    Thanks
  20. AdvNener

    AdvNener Long timer

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