TUKTOYAKTUK 2019

Discussion in 'Americas' started by Lizzard323, Jun 27, 2018.

  1. TravellingTartar

    TravellingTartar Been here awhile

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    First of all, thank you Eddie for starting this thread. I was privileged to ride into Tuk with Eddie and Anne in June 2018. To be fair, Eddie was kind enough to let me ride in first ;-) I am hoping to ride back up to Tuk in the next couple of years but first I'm hoping to drive up in my Jeep, hopefully in the winter. More on that another time.

    Today I am writing for those who are still interested in helping out Tuk. This time it's not stickers, it's to help fund four young Tuktoyaktuk filmmakers who have produced a film on climate change. Their goal is to present their film at a major climate change conference. If you can help a little, I invite you to do so. If you cannot help, then consider copying the link and spreading the news in other adventure, north, climate change, etc. venues.

    To all those considering a ride to Tuk, if I can humbly chime in considering I first went up in the 60s, revisited in the 80s, and rode back up last year, do it. As Eddie likes to say, I'm paraphrasing, doing it is far better than planning for it. A Dempster ride is the ride of a lifetime, period. Rain, snow, shine, bears, no bears, bugs, no bugs... its magical.

    That's all for now. Here is the link: gf.me/u/vkpnyg



    [​IMG]
  2. guideboat1

    guideboat1 Been here awhile Supporter

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    I was just up there last month and must make an obvious, to me, comment. Instead of supporting a straw man, biased film focusing on "climate change", evidenced by the photo above, maybe to honestly and positively benefit TUK and its residents focusing efforts on cleaning up the dump that you encounter as you enter town; and cleaning up the piles of junk vehicles and snowmobiles and what not littering the tundra. That huge pile of unmaintained, loosely dumped trash, getting bigger every day, has a much greater impact on the local and regional people and environment, the permafrost, and flora and fauna habitat now in real time than promoting the transcendental aspects of a climate change view that on completion will do no more for Tuk and its residents than a few people benefiting, or hoping to benefit, from its distribution.
    RockyDS, travlr_45, Cajunhawg and 2 others like this.
  3. AllSeasonRider

    AllSeasonRider Wandering, maybe a little lost...

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    Wild idea... Maybe both are important?
  4. AwDang

    AwDang Enabler

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    This isnt the place for politics or religion
  5. AllSeasonRider

    AllSeasonRider Wandering, maybe a little lost...

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    And yet I see your like on a very politicized post...
  6. guideboat1

    guideboat1 Been here awhile Supporter

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    My response was not intended to be in any way a political statement but scientific observation founded in my many decades of professional training and experience in the environmental field. My focus was on pointing out that TUK, both locally and in a regional perspective, has, IMHO, a much more tangible, real and bigger environmental concern(s) and bellwether of impending environmental problems bigger and more profound than climate change - trash and that impact on the planet, animals and people of that region. Setting aside the marketing potential and rhetoric surrounding the climate change crowds, and regardless of where you stand on the issue, accumulated solid waste disposal and what constitutes the broad spectrum of contaminates included in solid waste being indiscriminately and openly dumped in the TUK area should be of more concern both to the locals and anyone concerned about the Arctic. Promoting a developmental film through this forum allegedly being prepared by obviously young people with no substantive scientific training in the environmental sciences but who are making the film with a predetermined premise that climate change is a substantial and document-able problem in TUK should not the focus of this forum. These uninformed kids are not noticing the real doom barreling down on them, in favor of a more PC topic. Again a topic that may be more marketable, but would be a film ignoring the real human impact that I observed in TUK and for the majority of human occupied areas of the Dempster and NW and Yukon territories. Riding into TUK past their open dump on my way to the Arctic Ocean sign was a real eye opener, and certainly not what I had expected, but being in the field was a huge NEON SIGN to me saying that place is not a primitive and pristine as many would say that area is, in fact it has more in common with huge metropolitan areas of the world than not! Something we on this site many seemingly ignore or do not want to acknowledge in our journeys. We ride to these places for many reasons, we should not be forgetting everything we observe along the way on our adventures, that includes the beautiful and not so desirable encounters - that is the true story(s) to be told.
    kitsapjoe, RockyDS, MGV8 and 3 others like this.
  7. AwDang

    AwDang Enabler

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    The dump and the unoccupied structures are quite a shock as you ride in to town.
    The snow machines out on the tundra don’t bother me. When it warms up they have to stop running them. So they get parked were they are. Folks will retrieve them after the snow sets in.
    guideboat1 likes this.
  8. Rollin'

    Rollin' does it come in black? Supporter

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    I asked John at Grandma's Kitchen why the snowmobiles were abandoned. He said they were not abandoned, people use them year round because they do less damage to the tundra than ATV's. They use them to ride to lakes and again they use them year round.
  9. poppawheelie

    poppawheelie Long timer

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    I'll be watching for your Jeep adventure. Please mention it on this thread if you post the story elsewhere. Next Summer my wife will be retired and we will go to Tuk in our Jeep. I've ridden solo from PA to Prudhoe Bay and back and attempted the Dempster - turned back by weather. Getting old now. Jeep looks like good alternative.
    As for not getting political here, climate change should NOT be a political subject. As adventure riders we'd better be concerned about conditions in the Arctic instead of just riding there and saying, "Duh, look at the pretty scenery."
    guideboat1 and AllSeasonRider like this.
  10. MGV8

    MGV8 Long timer Supporter

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    The dump makes quite a statement as you ride into town but I figure that was the very edge of town before the road. Plus how did they deal with garbage before road? Like the rest of us, dump it in some hole on the edge of town. Now that there is a road maybe there might be enough money coming in that they can deal with this properly. I hope so.
    guideboat1 likes this.
  11. 'Bob'

    'Bob' Been here awhile Supporter

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    Yep, John Steen of Steen Enterprises (Grandma's Kitchen, guiding, whale watching etc.) told me the same thing. He said they used snowmobiles for picking berries as well because their wide tracks didn't damage the country like ATV wheels did.
    We had a good chat in his garage while we searched for a pesky slow leak in my rear tire... turned out to be one of those air nailer pin nails buried just below the surface of the Heidenau K60.
    He had a nice fire burning in his shed, lots of interesting pictures and things to talk about. Plus it was 5 degrees C with occasional sleet outside so I was in no real rush to leave.
    I found Mr. Steen to be an extremely interesting and knowledgable guy to talk to. From or conversations about the pictures, tools and equipment in his shed, he's obviously a multi-tradesman, guide, hunter, fisherman, environmentalist, a true family man and an engaged community member. Definitely a "go to guy" in Tuktoyaktuk.
  12. Andocalrisian

    Andocalrisian Adventurer

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    Been awhile since this threads been active but wondering what sorta range is required? I’ve got a thirsty 990 and guessing I’d need to sort out extra fuel capacity.
  13. RockyDS

    RockyDS Lost in the wilderness

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    You need roughly 375 kms to get to Eagle Plains from the start of the Dempster where there is a cardlock gas station or 415 kms from Dawson City.
  14. Andocalrisian

    Andocalrisian Adventurer

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    Ok great info. Thanks Rocky. I’m not too far off that range but will sort out a fuel bag / camel tank. Haven’t done too much research but dreaming of trips when the world goes back to “normal”.
  15. Phoenix101

    Phoenix101 Long timer

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    the cardlock at the start of the Dempster sometimes is out of order... so figure Dawson City, and if there is fuel at the start of the road, top off again. Other fuel stops Eagle Plains, Ft. McPherson, Inuvik ... hope the area is open again in 2021
  16. Andocalrisian

    Andocalrisian Adventurer

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  17. caribooster

    caribooster Not enough time...

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    When we went up in 2014 one of our group was on a 990 and he packed a 3 gal rotopax with him. As stated above there is a cardlock at the start of the Dempster which is about 45 km south of Dawson city however it was not working the day we were there.
  18. Cowtowner

    Cowtowner Been here awhile Supporter

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    Yukon border can hang up travel too due to self isolation requirements other than residents of B.C., NWT and Nunavut.

    Will be interesting to see how borders fully open up including the role of vaccination.
  19. ApexJeff

    ApexJeff Been here awhile

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    FYI There is a phone number on the card lock to call if you can't get gas, they will respond and help.
    Andocalrisian likes this.
  20. AllSeasonRider

    AllSeasonRider Wandering, maybe a little lost...

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    That card lock station wasn't working for me, either. I think it was open, but hell if I could figure out how to get it to work.

    Dawson City isn't that far away - if you need to top up again at the card lock, you're probably cutting it too close anyway :lol3