Two engineers ride the MABDR (Mid Atlantic Backcountry Discovery Route)

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by Am.E, May 31, 2018.

  1. Am.E

    Am.E Been here awhile

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
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    Location:
    NCNC
    We just finished the MABDR a few days ago (5/26/2018), and I managed to throw together a little report.

    Mostly, I’m posting on ADV because this particular BDR is new as of earlier this year, so not too many people have ridden it yet. I don’t often post to ADV, but I really like keeping trip reports on my personal blog (mostly for my own purposes), so its not much more work to just cross post it here. Feel free to skip all the blah blah words below and just scroll through the pictures:)

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    About us:

    As stated, we’re a couple of engineers living in NC that have a love of moto travel. We are not new to extended moto travel, but are mostly road riders that are starting to dip our toes into more off-pavement adventures. The MABDR is a fantastic introduction to adventure travel, as its not much of an extension beyond what we were already doing, and love. The difference is we didn’t have to do any work to plan the route, which we both think is aces.

    I’m not thrilled about this thread title, but there it is. The only other ride report I’ve posted to ADV is our Alaska trip in 2014. In that report, I tried, and failed in typical engineer fashion, to make a joke in the thread title. I intended the engineer label to poke fun at us as a couple of dorks, and people took it….differently. And yet, here it is again, because now I look at it as some sort of branding. “Two engineers” is a bit of a unique phrase in the thread titles, which means anyone skimming through will know its us, and can decide whether to read or not.

    About the motos:

    I write about this at the end of the report, but we chose our small bikes over our bigger motos for this trip, and would make that choice again. We had a grand old time goofing around on our little bikes. His is a 2016 WR250R, and mine is 2009 Honda CRF230L.

    The content is just copied from the trip report I made for the blog, which is read by family and friends that aren’t motorcyclists.

    About the MABDR:

    For those that want a quick overview of the route – Sections 1-3 (VA and WV) have quite a bit of dirt. The northern part of section 3, nearly all of section 4, and the southern half of section 5 are almost all pavement (some VA, WV, MD, and PA), and the northern half of section 5 through the end of section 9 (all of PA, basically) are mostly off pavement.
    #1
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  2. Am.E

    Am.E Been here awhile

    Joined:
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    MABDR - Moto Adventure Time - Cross posted from here: https://amytracker.wordpress.com/2018/05/30/mabdr-moto-adventure-time/

    Guess what? Its moto trip time!

    Those who know us know that we’ve had some obstacles in recent years that have prevented us from taking our beloved extended motorcycle trips. As of spring 2018, however, we were able to dip our toe back in to our favorite mode of travel with a most excellent week long adventure on the MABDR.

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    First, some definition: MABDR stands for Mid Atlantic Back Country Discovery Route. The BDR group is a non profit organization “whose mission is to establish and preserve off-highway routes for dual-sport and adventure motorcycles. Through education, advocacy, and promotion of responsible motorcycle travel, BDR seeks to preserve backcountry motorcycling opportunities for generations to come.” (BDR website here: https://ridebdr.com/About-Backcountry-Discovery-Routes)

    The Mid-Atlantic BDR (MABDR) is the eighth BDR route developed for dual-sport and adventure motorcycle travel.

    MABDR is a scenic ride for dual-sport and adventure motorcycles that uses dirt, gravel and paved roads to wind through remote parts of Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. Starting in Damascus Virginia, and ending in Lawrenceville, Tioga County, PA, this 1,080-mile route, primarily uses forest roads and rural country lanes, to lead riders through the Appalachian mountains, majestic forests, bucolic farming landscapes, Amish country, and locations that played pivotal roles in early American history.”

    The mid atlantic route is their most recently developed route, and their first in the eastern part of the US (where it is admittedly much more difficult to develop off-pavement routes due to an older, denser road network that is largely paved, and much less public land). We’ve had our eye on some of their western routes for a while, but being residents of NC, making the trip to the western states to go ride has been more of a commitment than we’ve been able to make yet. The effort to develop “adventure” routes in the eastern US was undertaken specifically for people like us, which we think is just fantastic. The route was officially made public in March of this year, so we clearly jumped at the chance to take a trip so close to home, and we’re probably among the first wave of people to ride this particular route.

    The overall BDR looks like this:

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    To follow the route, its essential to use the GPS tracks downloaded from the BDR website. We also had the physical Bulter map, and think the trip would have suffered without it. The Butler map is incredibly well done and very useful, but there is simply no way to make a paper map with enough detail required to follow the route by that alone. It would take a stack of very detailed maps, and even then, you’d have to stop to navigate at every turn, which are sometimes in very close sequence in close proximity with many other (wrong) options to choose from. There are hundreds of turns, many on undistinguished and unlabeled forest roads. Sometimes there are only one or two roads to choose from, and the way is clear, other times, more than two roads diverged in the wood, some paralleling each other for awhile, and its not a matter of picking the one less traveled. Even with the GPS tracks, we made many a u-turn trying to stay on course (which sometimes is part of the fun).

    Ok, introductory context out of the way, time to get started. Sort of. First, we needed to drop the dog off with my parents. Geographically, since we had to go there to drop the dog off anyway, it made sense to start the trip from their house. This meant we had to get both motorcycles (and all the gear), plus the (85lb) dog to their house. So, our obligatory start of the trip photo looked like this:

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    Kevin rode in the rain for a couple of hours, while I trucked my bike, the dog, and a bunch of stuff. Wearing my helmet while driving meant we could use the SENA radios to talk during the trip, just to make the whole affair that much more eccentric.

    After all the prep and trying to make work go away long enough to take a vacation, it felt great to start riding in mostly dry weather the next morning.
    #2
  3. Am.E

    Am.E Been here awhile

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
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    Location:
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    MABDR- Headed north through VA , WV, and MD - Cross posted from: https://amytracker.wordpress.com/2018/05/30/mabdr-headed-north-through-va-wv-and-md/

    Starting the BDR:

    Its spring here in NC, which often means its wet. While we were fortunate to have multi-day stretches of great weather that weren’t too hot, riding this route in the fall definitely improves the chances for having dry weather. We delayed our trip start by half a week, avoiding a weather system that would have had us riding in the rain all day for several days. This meant we had a smaller window of opportunity to make the trip before we had to be back home, and meant we ended our trip by riding during the dreaded Memorial Day holiday weekend (dreaded if you are trying to enjoy the outdoors with the rest of the country at the same time and would like to a place to stay (including camping) without needing reservations).

    We spent the morning of Day 1 on a lovely ride to the start of the BDR:

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    Some of the pics below aren’t directly on the BDR, but certain family members will recognize and appreciate that the route passes so close to familiar territory:

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    We didn’t quite make it to the official start in Damascus, VA. Scattered storms meant that while we mostly stayed dry, the timing of storms passing through the Damascus area meant we gave up and started riding the BDR north from Marion, VA after lunch instead.

    Here is where I want to note that since we moved houses last year, I still have not located my helmet camera. At first I didn’t care about not having it on this trip, as it meant there was one less thing to manage, but as the trip went on, I really regretted not having it. We’ve gotten some fantastic pictures with the helmet mounted camera in the past, and I think not having it on this trip really takes away from showing what the bulk of our adventure was really about. The only pictures I have are from when I bothered to get out my cell phone. We didn’t even bring our real camera this time (space was at a premium).

    The back country and unpaved roads at the start of the BDR in VA are mostly familiar territory for us. (We’ve ridden Tub run road numerous times on different motos, for example). Its still fun every time.

    Our preference on moto trips is to camp, but I’m not so enthusiastic about camping in the rain if it can be avoided. Night 1 of our trip was going to be wet, so we took the opportunity to follow the promotional materials for the route and stayed in the Mountain Lake Resort hotel. They make sure you know that Dirty Dancing was filmed on location at this resort. (Dirty Dancing is not the cultural touchstone for me that it clearly is to the plethora of middle aged women wandering the resort in Dirty Dancing tshirts).

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    Mostly, I was just glad to be warm and dry. The access to excellent food didn’t hurt either. Already, the BDR is taking me places in my own back yard I hadn’t been to yet. Shrines to Dirty Dancing or not, the resort is a neat place I would like to go back to.

    Scenes from the route in VA:

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    While none of the MABDR is particularly technical off road riding, my pictures are definitely of some of the easy cruising sections. VA and WV in general seemed to have more variation in road types and conditions than what we found in the northern sections, and were comparatively slower traveling.

    Taking a moto trip when one person has extreme dietary restrictions means really odd logistics (even more so than “normal” moto travel logistics, which can already be challenging). It also leads to scenes like this in the Walmart parking lot:

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    After a somewhat later start from the resort in the morning, some somewhat slower sections, and a diversion into town to re-supply, we made it as far as Douthat State Park in VA for the night. I typically love to get pictures of our bikes at our campsites, but somehow failed to do that at almost every camp spot this trip. Oh well.

    We stopped at the first campsite we got to, which was nice enough, but the one next door within walking distance down the road had this lovely view (and was more crowded):

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    More little paved back roads, gravel roads, and forest trails the next day – a great way to travel by moto:

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    The middle of section 3 in VA (there is a tiny bit in WV here too) is where we came upon our first and the most significant of the water crossings on this route, just south of Brandywine, VA. The pictures and video crack me up, it looks so tame and shallow compared to the actual experience. Fortunately, the rain had stopped long enough for the crossings to be passable; I suspect they are not if there has been a lot of rainfall recently.


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    Kevin went ahead first, and was quick to park his bike and get out his phone and point it at me. He swears he was not rooting for me to dump it. I don’t believe him:)

    He did catch some fun video. Here I am almost looking like I know what I’m doing:




    Here is the second of the “bigger” crossings:

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    This second one is where I nearly dumped it, and then practically fell over laughing about it:




    There were three crossings about like that, with round, softball size rocks that weren’t actually visible on the bottom. You can’t actually see the best line or where to place your front wheel. Is there really a technique for this other than carry a little speed and just go for it? (This is not my first water crossing, but I definitely don’t get to do it very much).

    There were many smaller crossings after this that did not get photographed, but were heartily enjoyed as we picked our way through the woods.

    This is near the end of section 3, where we join back up with paved roads for a bit.

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    Taking a break with rare cell reception (we’re self employed, so, never really off work).

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    What we did not do while we had the chance was check the weather (how dumb is that?). We ended the day riding into “the smoke hole canyon,” which is an excellent inclusion on this route. The big bend campground is in a neat location in the river bend, and would have been great if we hadn’t gotten rained on all night and all morning as we packed up. Oops. The cabins at the smoke hole resort looked like paradise to me from my soggy seat as we rode by it the next morning.
    #3
  4. Am.E

    Am.E Been here awhile

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
    369
    Location:
    NCNC
    MABDR – MD, WV, and north through PA - Cross posted from here: https://amytracker.wordpress.com/2018/05/30/mabdr-md-wv-and-north-through-pa/

    Just south of the much touted Oldtown Low Water Toll Bridge, we found this little community park with a much welcome covered pavilion. This little town unexpectedly had all the amenities we could want to wait out the passing rain.

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    Dry, covered bike parking, picnic tables for lunch, bathrooms, and cell reception that allowed us to plan our next moves and kill some time. The radar showed that if we waited it out, we could ride in the dry, but if we kept riding, we’d follow the rain cloud east.

    Moto-hobo time:

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    Attempting to dry wet socks on a hot motor:

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    Kevin’s Alpinestars Toucan boots have been worth every penny (seriously, great kit), but Kevin is determined to get all the life he can out of them and more. After many years of use and one wreck, he discovered this trip that they are no longer water proof, and spent the entire trip trying to keep his feet dry. As of this writing, a new pair is on order.

    After setting out, we were reminded why low water bridges are so rare. Instead of the charming experience of riding across the old bridge and paying the $0.25 toll into a little tin cup at a cute toll house, we found this:

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    *sigh* It was not to be. The toll house was gone, and the bridge would not be passable that day. (If you can’t see, its covered in a mighty pile of debris).

    We had a friendly chat for a bit with three guys standing around watching the excavator clear the bridge (maybe they were working?). They knew about the MABDR, and gave an earnest but laughably convoluted description of how to route around the bridge and get to the next river crossing. Without google maps, there is no way I could have followed the way that man was trying to tell us to go.

    They also told fun stories on each other, including the fact that one of the guys who lives there won’t use that bridge. He lives just on the other side, but drives an hour out of his way not to use the low water bridge. He claims “its a real pretty drive,” (which it turns out it is), but I think that’s just southern speak for “that bridge is sketchy and I’m not going to cross it.”

    Despite being fairly clear on how to connect back up with the route, the GPS sometimes does goofy things with auto-routing, which led us astray for awhile. Between waiting out the rain for 2.5 hours, and routing around the bridge, we made very little forward progress this afternoon. The timing probably worked out for the best. We landed near Antietam that night, which meant we could start our day with a tour of the historic site.

    I can’t say I recommend the camping experience at the Antietam Creek Campground, its right on a somewhat well traveled through road.

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    We had a beautiful day for touring the Antietam National Battle field, marking the deadliest battle of the Civil War:

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    We spent a little while inside the museum itself, and then took the motos around to the various sites on the auto tour that takes you chronologically and geographically through the battle:

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    We probably spent 2.5 hours or more at Antietam, but an enthusiast could easily spend much more. There is quite a bit there, and its all very well done.

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    One benefit of visiting so close to Memorial Day is that the local 5th graders were putting out flags at the cemetery:

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    We made our way to Harpers Ferry in WV for lunch. We didn’t spend much time in Harpers Ferry, which is a place I’d like to come back to. One morning poking around historic sites was enough, and it was time to ride.

    The northern half of section 5 leaves the population centers and pavement behind and goes back into the woods.
    #4
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  5. Am.E

    Am.E Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2012
    Oddometer:
    369
    Location:
    NCNC
    MABDR – PA north to the end at the NY border - https://amytracker.wordpress.com/2018/05/30/mabdr-pa-north-to-the-end-at-the-ny-border/

    Sections 5-9 go north on mostly unpaved forest roads through PA to the end of the route at the NY border.

    Early on in PA, we found this closed road on the route:

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    This was easy enough to route around to the west, and we joined right back up with the BDR at a closed gate on the other end.


    Off road riding in PA was entirely new to us, and turned out to be delightful. My experience in PA has admittedly been mostly limited to passing through on the interstate, and what I saw from there did not attract me much. Thus the benefit of traveling on back roads. I had no idea PA had so much outdoor recreational opportunity. The state forests and state parks are beautiful and very nice, and full of nearly endless miles of unpaved forest roads. While I’m sure there is technical riding to be found, I was delighted at all the fast, well maintained roads through the woods. Roller compacted forest roads were an entirely new experience, and it was great fun to ride so easily and quickly through the forest. Did I mention it was endless? I have no idea how they maintain all those roads. They were everywhere, hundreds of miles.

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    At some point after this shot, we camped the night at Pine Grove Furnace State Park in PA, which was another excellent state park campground. We even manged to camp near two other moto travelers, one from NY, and one from Alabama who was also on the BDR. (*Waves hi if you ever see this*).

    We found another closed road on the BDR here, which was also easy to route around:

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    Our re-route was probably just as good, as we found this along the way:

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    Paraphrased, the sign basically says “humans really trashed this place up, and now we’re trying to fix it.”

    The GPS tracks tried to route us up a marked private road, which I suspect is an error. We routed around easily enough. We could have just blasted on through, but that would be rude, and being considerate of private property is how you keep off road riding opportunities from being closed.

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    Short bits of pavement through Amish (I suspect mostly Mennonite, actually) country.

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    I wish I had my helmet camera. We were traveling through some Amish/Mennonite farmland on an unpainted paved road, and ended up stopping so a boy could let some cattle across the road. We stopped well short and turned the motors off, as it would have been really rude to spook the cattle. The boy could not have been more than ten, which led to some “kids these days” discussion regarding how most modern mainstream children that age are not capable of that sort of responsibility. When he got all the cows to the other side and closed the gate, we started up and rode by. (I’m not sure if those cows cared about a couple of motorcycles or not, they were dairy cows who clearly wanted to head back to the barn, and didn’t seem concerned with anything else.)

    Obviously we stopped to get a picture of this sign:

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    A few times, I asked Kevin to stop in middle of the road just to get a picture, we rode through so much truly gorgeous scenery (that the camera never really captures):

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    At this point in the trip, we really needed to find a way to do some laundry. Thus we ended up at a slightly dumpy appearing commercial campground right on a major road. Despite a somewhat sketchy appearance, we had a reasonable tent spot to ourselves, a clean if outdated bathroom, and the owner was a pretty nice, chatty guy. This also happens to be the only time I got pictures of our camp spot the whole trip.

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    Randomly, the camp owner is also the owner of a couple of Bison, who share a field with his solar panels (this makes sense):



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    Day 7 (we started the BDR after lunch on Day 1) had us passing through Poe Paddy State Park in PA, yet another fantastic outdoor recreation area.

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    The owner of last nights campground had told Kevin about an old railroad tunnel that had been re-done in 2015 into part of a walking/bicycling trail. We spent some time this morning on a side-quest to go check it out, only learning after we finally found it that its practically right off the BDR in the state park.

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    We met a man named Jeff Zimmerman walking on the way in, who proved to be a delightful, if long winded, gem on our trip. Jeff has keys and access to the “professor’s shanty,” a shack just off the end of the tunnel, and he demonstrated his considerable skills in telling rambling old man stories telling us all about it.


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    We also learned that due to the bend in the river relative to the mountain tunnel, you can essentially float in a tube off one end of the tunnel, and if the river is slower, spend nearly an hour floating around the mountain, and then get out at the other end of the tunnel and walk a relatively short distance back. Now that’s neat.

    I really was torn between living in the moment and taking advantage of our small bit of fortune in meeting this local person willing to give so much insight into this spot, and feeling the need to escape from a very one sided and long winded conversation so we could put some miles on. I wonder if we’d sat down and had a beer with him if we’d still be there right now.

    We really did have a lot of fun in PA:

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    We spent our last night on the BDR at the Pettecote Junction commercial campground, owned by a really nice couple. At this point, it was Saturday of Memorial Day weekend, and they were booked solid. They could have turned us away, and instead let us set up by their pavilion in a common area since there were no camping spots left. This is one of the nicest, most family friendly campgrounds I’ve ever been too. (Seriously, most well kept and nicely maintained campground I think I’ve ever seen, and this is apparently where the high dollar travel trailers go). As dirty moto hobos, we were a bit out of place, but the kids and the noise calmed down, and we got a good nights sleep after a much needed shower.

    Our final day on the MABDR took us through Colton Point State Park, and the “Grand Canyon of PA,” which of course is a very picturesque gorge with a river at the bottom.

    We didn’t know what this was on our way into the park, so we took a picture: (I still don’t know what it is).

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    I never did tire of the scenery:

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    And that’s it for the MABDR. We made it to the official end of the route just before lunch. 7 days to ride the entire route, spread over 8 days (started after lunch on Day 1, finished before lunch on Day 8). If I had to guess, I would think most people will run this route in 6-7 days, unless you get really enthusiastic about side-quests, run a fairly slow pace, or run into even more delays than we did. If your goal is to go through quickly don’t mind long days, and aren’t interested in sight seeing, a good rider could ride it in 5 days.

    MABDR time estimate:
    4 days - possible with long days, consistent quick pace, few stops, not much sightseeing, and no delays (if you don't camp, and especially if you skip the pavement section going to the historic sites and Antietem, 4 days is doable. I personally would not enjoy this trip)
    5 days - long days, quick pace, few delays, moderate sightseeing. easier if not camping.
    6 days - moderate pace, sightseeing, and delays (weather, tires, re-routes, etc) - I think most will want do the MABDR in about 6 days. This an enjoyable but not leisurely time frame.
    7+ days - slow/leisurely pace. moderate to significant weather or other delays, and/or moderate to significant sightseeing.


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    This is about 25 miles from the end of the BDR, and will only mean anything to particular family members:

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    Since our bikes and gear were so dirty from all the mud a dust, it was very helpful that it rained so much on the first day of our trip back home:

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    This balloon we found slowly blowing across the parking lot of our hotel on our final day of trip represents our feelings:

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    So that’s it!

    We would like to extend a huge thanks and hearty congratulations to the BDR folks for putting together such a great route. Its hard to express to folks not in the know how much work is involved in putting something like this together. We had a great time playing around on our little bikes on this trip, and think the BDR group did an outstanding job making an interesting and varied route.

    Lastly, a note on bike choice. This route was specifically designed to be ridden by the oh-so-popular big adventure bikes. I’m sure you can have a great time on your R1200GS if that’s your thing (really, that’s not sarcasm). We are fortunate in that, as multiple bike owners, we had a choice of bikes to take on this trip. We also have the ability to buy any nearly any mass produced bike we want. We intentionally chose our small bikes over the bigger ones, and regret nothing. Kevin rode his 2016 Yamaha WR250R, and I rode my tiny 2009 Honda CRF230L. We had a blast. Everything is easier and less work on a small bike, and we goofed around and generally remembered the joy of riding a lot more than if we’d been on our bigger bikes. We’ve decided that riding a route designed for bigger bikes on smaller ones is a recipe for delight. When off road, smaller is better. As an introduction to BDR routes, the MABDR was fantastic, and left us wanting more.
    #5
  6. Crazy Creek

    Crazy Creek Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2013
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    51
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    Central Florida
    Great report!

    I like that it is only a 7 day commitment.
    #6
  7. mbanzi

    mbanzi Adventurer

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2014
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    33
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    Nice report!
    #7
  8. jspringator

    jspringator Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 11, 2008
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    974
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    Versailles, KY
    Enjoyed it!

    2 questions.

    Is there an easy way around the 2 big water crossings?

    Are knobbies absolutely necessary if you bypass the 2 big water crossings?

    I have an Versys 300 that has what looks to be 90 street 10 dirt tires.
    #8
  9. Idahocharley

    Idahocharley Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 16, 2017
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    142
    Thanks for posting
    #9
  10. Am.E

    Am.E Been here awhile

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    NCNC
    Yes, I would say you can bypass the water crossings, but probably not once you are on that trail. You'd need to locate the section of dirt south of brandywine, and skip the entire road its on. I'm not sure if there are turn offs you can use once on that road without studying the map closely.

    Your second question is a matter of preference. The 90/10 tires are probably ok but not great for 75%+ of the off pavement sections, if its dry. I would not choose them at all, on any bike. A 90/10 tire is basically a street tire, and is essentially useless in the dirt. Even if the the dirt is easy, a 50/50 tire or better makes a huge difference. Any given trail sometimes has some small bad spots, and your 90/10 tires will make those way more of an issue than necessary. Plus, there is a lot of fresh loose/thick gravel. Like trying to ride a river of marbles, sometimes uphill. Can you do it? Probably yes. Should you? Depends on how difficult you want to make the trip for yourself.

    I am a street rider who is learning about off pavement riding, and my favorite lesson so far is how great knobbies are off road. (I was always trying to run the most street oriented tire I could because I still like road riding...no more). We ran dunlop D606s, which combined with our small bikes, is more capability than this route requires. But it was great, and those d606s have way better road manners than seems possible for such a knobby tire. They did not let me down, even on pavement in the rain (where I admittedly did not ask much of them)....I'm now a D606 believer.
    #10
    nowimfound, Jager and i4bikes like this.
  11. VPS1

    VPS1 Adventurer Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2014
    Oddometer:
    21
    Location:
    Tampa Bay Area, Florida
    Thanks for posting this report and the pictures! How did you ride back home south? I am considering this going north also on my WR250R like yours and really don't want to do interstate all the way south on a small bike. Just wondering what you guys did?
    #11
  12. manfromthestix

    manfromthestix Lost in Space Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2004
    Oddometer:
    4,545
    Location:
    Lexington, Virginia
    Hey you engineers rode right through my "back yard"! I'm glad you enjoyed it; Douthat State Park is just over the mountain from our farm and we love it there. I'm a geologist and would have enjoyed visiting with you and trading some engineer-vs-geologist comments! :D Thanks for the nice RR.
    #12
    Am.E likes this.
  13. Am.E

    Am.E Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2012
    Oddometer:
    369
    Location:
    NCNC
    We rode pavement in the interest of time, but stayed off the interstate. We did a lot of 219 (look on the map west of the route, it runs south all the way to blacksburg va, which is generally how we needed to go), which is sometimes really excellent curvy 2-lane, and is sometimes divided 4 lane. We also used the butler street map for the area so we could take some of their highlighted roads back home, which worked out great.
    #13
    i4bikes likes this.
  14. smoltz

    smoltz Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2011
    Oddometer:
    312
    Location:
    NH
    Thanks for the writeup! Looking at doing this trip in the next couple months.
    #14
  15. RockBreaker

    RockBreaker Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2007
    Oddometer:
    966
    Location:
    Athens, TN...The best riding area ever!!!
    Very well written, I just finished it and was following two sets of tire tracks for several days, thought they were small bikes as their wasn't a lot of drama, probably you guys... We started at Damascus. took us 5 days running a conservative pace but did 12 or 14 hour days...
    #15
    Am.E likes this.
  16. Am.E

    Am.E Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2012
    Oddometer:
    369
    Location:
    NCNC
    We were following a set of 4 bike tracks a lot of the time, looked like slightly larger motos. I kept hoping we'd run into other people riding the bdr:)

    I don't do 12-14 hr days if I can help it, especially multiple days in a row. For people who like that that kind of trip, I can see completing it in 5 days. For us, on average I'd say we're kickstands up at 8-9 am (sometimes earlier or later), and we usually like to eat dinner in camp, ideally with enough daylight left to walk around a bit. On this particular trip, having to re-supply every other day to meet strict dietary needs also took a bunch of time. So, yeah, I think most will take a bit less time to complete the BDR than we did.
    #16
  17. Am.E

    Am.E Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2012
    Oddometer:
    369
    Location:
    NCNC
    #17
  18. GreenMachine08

    GreenMachine08 n00b

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2016
    Oddometer:
    3
    Location:
    Michigan
    Thanks for sharing and great pictures! Our group is leaving Michigan in a couple days for this trip. Can't wait!
    #18
  19. AZQKR

    AZQKR Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 8, 2018
    Oddometer:
    992
    Location:
    arizona
    Excellent description and pics sir. Thanks for sharing, I enjoyed taking the trip with you.
    #19
  20. jwhuls

    jwhuls Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2012
    Oddometer:
    356
    Location:
    Loogootee, Indiana
    What happened to the dog?
    #20