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Uhaul Reference Post

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by Ebeo1, Nov 4, 2018.

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How Would You Transport a Motorcycle?

  1. Use my own equipment

    11 vote(s)
    84.6%
  2. Hire someone to do it

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. Drive it

    2 vote(s)
    15.4%
  4. Rent equipment

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  5. Borrow equipment

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. Ebeo1

    Ebeo1 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 16, 2013
    Oddometer:
    248
    Location:
    Maryland
    I rented a uhaul 5x8 enclosed trailer to move two bikes. Everything worked out ok for me but it wasn't ideal.

    I used a 4 cylinder suv, normally I get about 28 highway but got 18 with it fully loaded and 21.5 with an empty trailer. Three day rental was $76, and 240 miles was about $38 in gas.

    The trailer looks bigger when empty. Once I got one bike in it started to look really small. There are four D rings in each corner to tie down. Two parallel boards run the length oft the trailer to tie to. I didn't use them and wouldn't put to much tension on them if I had. I loaded a Suzuki DL-650. The wind screen nearly touched the roll up door.

    Pros:. You don't need to buy or store your own trailer. It being a box trailer I loaded the bikes the night before the trip and felt they were secure. There is a a little shelf or edge on the back so that a ramp can be used and it would flush with the floor. The tires are inflated and lights checked when get it. Everything stays dry. Room for accessories.

    Cons: No tire chock. Need your own ramp. You want to tighten the straps to the kick stand side of the bike. This works for one bike. Once you have two bikes in it's a tight fit, difficult to tie down. The blinkers hit the wall. Luckily they didn't break on me.

    I could have backed the suzuki in. That would have allowed it two lean towards the wall but I prefer the front tire to be against the front wall and not the roll up door. The other option is to use an open trailer they come with a ramp, you have more tie down options, and there is no risk of handle bars or blinkers banging into the wall.

    IMG_20181025_094151479.jpg
    #1
  2. troidus

    troidus Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2010
    Oddometer:
    48,613
    Location:
    Georgia
    U-HAUL trailers are not guaranteed to stay dry inside. I learned that the hard way.
    #2
  3. PunkinHead

    PunkinHead Moobless Adventurer Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2005
    Oddometer:
    10,488
    Location:
    Land of Walmart Shoppers
    It's a wood floor. Add you're own chock and tie down rings. Sweep out the wood shavings from drilling the holes before returning the trailer.
    #3
  4. troidus

    troidus Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2010
    Oddometer:
    48,613
    Location:
    Georgia
    Aluminum.
    #4
    digger2 likes this.
  5. PunkinHead

    PunkinHead Moobless Adventurer Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2005
    Oddometer:
    10,488
    Location:
    Land of Walmart Shoppers
    So you'd be sweeping out aluminum shavings instead of wood.
    #5
  6. troidus

    troidus Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2010
    Oddometer:
    48,613
    Location:
    Georgia
    And paying for a new floor.
    #6
  7. south

    south Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,067
    Location:
    Florida
    For a one-time transport of 240 miles, first option is to enlist a friend, family member, or s.o. to drop off a (4 wheel) vehicle at the destination, then invite a riding buddy (possibly the same person who helped stage the return vehicle, if they're that good of a buddy) to take a ride with you using your bikes. Total cost, a lunch/dinner or two during or afterwards.

    Second option for a one-time transport is to just do what you did: suffer the minor hassles of a Uhaul move. As far as wheel chocks and tie-downs, you could always mount chocks on a sheet of (3/4") plywood and just lay it on/over the trailer floor; brace it against the inside walls of the trailer and the weight of the bike(s) will certainly hold it down. Then you could fab tie-down points off it as well.

    The viability of either of the other options of buying a trailer or borrowing someone else's, is entirely predicated on your own individual circumstances. While the advantages are obvious, if, with regard to the forner, you don't have room or ongoing use for a trailer, or, for the latter, you don't have anyone from whom to borrow a trailer, then those options really aren't in play.
    #7