Unfinished Business - Dempster Highway / Tuktoyaktuk 2018 in pictures.

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by DYNOBOB, Nov 2, 2018.

  1. DYNOBOB

    DYNOBOB lucky dog

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    I enjoyed your RR as well. Don't know how you guys do them real-time though...much respect!

    Figure to include Wynette on the next trip north so two-uo perspective is helpful.

    If you're near Kings Island look me up...


    .
  2. max384

    max384 Bandaided Supporter

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    I just finished the end of your story. GREAT ride report! Thank you for taking the time to share it.

    I've done 3 ride reports here so far, and I've gone back and reread each of them a few times, and it brings me right back to the ride every time I do. It's nice to be able to recount your adventure, share it with others, hear others' perspectives and responses to your ride, and to have the memories saved on here to go back and reread. I'm a big fan of writing ride reports.
    Bigbob1, DYNOBOB and ScotsFire like this.
  3. Gordon

    Gordon MC Rider

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    I like to write and read the RR's hope mine helps others. I know reading fellow adventures RR's has helped me a great deal. I will look you up if ever I am in your neck of the woods. Take care maybe see you on the road someday. Real time is challenging, I like doing the RR's that way when the experiences and my thoughts are fresh in my mind. Time seems to soften or exaggerate ones perspective on the memories and definitely the urgency that can be experienced while on the road. As you well know a person or persons go through many different emotions while on the road in out of the way, unfamiliar and remote locations. Pretty sure that is why we do what we do to experience and see the world as it is while riding our motorcycles. It is always a challenge and always rewarding for those who partake.
    Bigbob1, Ride Now and DYNOBOB like this.
  4. Noone

    Noone Long timer

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    Sitting at a Cross Roads lookin' for a sign
    Most of my pictures didn't survive (computer crash) but I did write about my trip in 2010 and it was published in Accelerate magazine (Kawasaki). It was a print magazine then on-line and I think it is now defunct. I have what I submitted in a word doc. but don't know how to post it. I have a picture of the gas station where I slept in Jade City (but can't upload it). There is an old yellow cart in the picture. This past fall I watched YouTube of CarolynsRVlife on her way to Alaska. She passed the same station and you can see the yellow cart in the same spot (in the video) all these years later :)
  5. RockyDS

    RockyDS Lost in the wilderness

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    It should work if you open the Word doc, select and copy your text. Then paste it into a message here.

    What's stopping you upload the picture?
  6. Noone

    Noone Long timer

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Sitting at a Cross Roads lookin' for a sign
    I don't know how to upload the picture. I don't have any types of "accounts" for pictures (smugmug, etc).

    As for the story, OK; you asked for it.

    Driftin’ to Deadhorse



    OR



    The 12,000 mile shake down ride.



    In 2010 I rode my Kawasaki Drifter to Alaska from Maryland. Why a Drifter and not a KLR? I don’t own a KLR: I own three Drifters. I’d spoken with some friends, Danny and Deb, in 2009 about riding to Alaska. It was on my bucket list. “We’re going in 2010 after Drift In. Wanna go”, they asked. I’m in!!



    I had about 16 months to prepare. I read everything I could find about riding to Alaska. Who, what, how, when, etc. Get a copy of The Milepost. Take it with you. Adventure Rider (www.advrider.com) is a great source of information from people who ride everywhere. I mean everywhere like Mongolia, Siberia, South America (all of it). I’m a firm believer in being properly prepared. I was a Boy Scout and I watched every episode of MacGyver. As you can tell from my picture I like to travel light. I was going to ride my 2000 800 Drifter but on the day of departure it wouldn’t run right so I swapped the luggage over to my as of then untested 2000 1500 Drifter and at the crack of 2:00 pm I hit the road.



    I have been riding Vulcans since 1997. They are tried and true platforms with virtually bullet proof engines. I bought my 2000 1500 Drifter in 2008 and had only ridden it a few miles to make sure it functioned properly. I did have the foresight to have done a complete “prep” in June of 2010 so the bike was ready “just in case”. In this case “prep” was new oil/filter, new hydraulic fluids, new anti-freeze, new brake pads, all systems functioned checked. I had even put my spare fenders on the bike so as to not risk damage to my color matched fenders.



    So I left Maryland for points west (well, southwest really as I rode down to Arkansas to meet with Danny and Deb, Jeannie and Mitchell) to head for Drift In in Durango Colorado. The first afternoon was uneventful and I made my way into Virginia where I stopped for the night. Bike was running fine and I was well rested the next morning as I headed out. I went for gas before I hit the interstate and about 50 years short of the station, on a busy uphill road, my bike shut off. The shoulder was gravel and sloped such that I couldn’t put the kickstand down to determine the issue. Thinking that I wasn’t completely out of fuel I rocked the bike back and forth hit the start button and away I went; about 20 feet. It worked last time so let’s try it again because this time I smell gas! It took a few times of start, lurch, stop to get to the station where I diagnosed the problem. Me.

    I’d had the tank off to inspect inside for rust and garbage and when I reinstalled it I hadn’t pushed the fuel line all the way on the nipple. It had lasted 300 miles before it worked itself lose. Easy fix, fuel up and away I rode.



    I wasn’t due to meet the gang in Texarkana until the next evening so I enjoyed a leisurely ride. The weather was good, the ride was good and all was well in the world. That evening I got a hotel room and went for supper. When I returned I noticed a fellow hotel dweller looking intently at my bike; so I looked intently at my bike too. Something was amiss.



    The muffler wrap had fallen off and was trailing. That could end badly so I went to re-wrap it and determined that when the front pipe had pulled lose from the back pipe (broken weld) the muffler wrap got lose. Nothing that can’t be fixed. I phoned Danny to let him know I’d need the help of his friend Mickey Jeans to fix my pipes. Mickey makes a lot of custom stuff for bikes and he does great work.



    The next day I made a temporary patch and away I rode. Some muffler tape and a soda can work well. It works even better if your muffler tape is really muffler tape and not plastic tape. The hazard of not reading the label when you are in the parts store. My patch lasted for at least five minutes before the tape melted. Oh well, the weather is fine and the bike is running fine even if it is a bit loud. West to Texarkana.



    Got to Texarkana about noonish and called Danny to show me to my hotel. Before he even said hello he took a picture of my bike and put it on face book. Laughingly he mentioned the Beverly Hillbillies. I still don’t get the joke. While we were at supper that night Mickey Jeans welded up my exhaust and I was ready to ride out the next morning; right into a thunderstorm.

    The reason Arkansas grows so much rice is because of Danny. Danny the Rain man can cure drought. If he were sent to the Sahara it would be green again.

    Other than the rain the day was mostly uneventful and we rode from Texarkana to Amarillo. I was noticing my back was hurting and my ankles were swelling. If I were a woman I’d think I had gotten pregnant but I’m not and I wasn’t. It was really bothersome and I could only think it was the seated position on the bike that was causing the problem. I didn’t think I could take another day of that much less another month. Danny also rides a 1500 Drifter but he has a spring solo seat made by Mickey. I tried it out and promptly tried to buy it. Danny wasn’t budging even when I offered as much as $5. Knowing I had to do something, I made a trip to Wally World where I bought a dense foam sleeping pad. A few minutes with a pen knife and half a roll of duct tape later I had fashioned a six inch “cushion” to raise me up in the seat. It might have looked goofy but I used that pad for the rest of the trip and no more back problems. I now have a custom made spring solo seat just like Danny.



    We rode from Amarillo to Durango arriving on a Sunday. Other than finding out I’m allergic to freshly cut alfalfa the day was uneventful. On Monday I asked Danny to ride my bike and see if he noticed anything unusual. He did; said it felt like the back was tail wagging. A look at the cupped rear tire and a disassembly of the rear half of the bike proved the drive shaft universal was toast. On Monday bikes shops are not open. Kawasaki sells the complete drive shaft only. I didn’t want to spend $300 on a drive shaft. I had remembered reading Gadget’s page about Kawasaki issues and fixes so I went on a Google hunt. Tucker Rocky has a universal joint for a Kawasaki snowmobile that is an exact fit for my Drifters universal. Part number in hand I waited until the next day for a shop to open where I had them order it and overnight it. The overnight cost was more than the part number but I had to have it. On Wednesday the part showed up and I had the shop install it on my drive shaft. There is a back story to the drive shaft.



    Denny Berg, the Godfather of the Drifter, attended our Drift In. How cool is that? The man responsible for the design and build of the prototype bike that would become the Drifter attended our little gathering. He brought the original Super Chief as well as his personal Drifter (frame number 48). He told me that if I wasn’t able to get the fix before we headed to Alaska he would take the drive shaft off his bike and loan it to me. Really? Can you imagine Arlen Ness or the like taking parts off his bike and loaning it to you so you can continue your trip? At the same time one of our members, Randy M., had commented on face book about my repair issue and another member, Randy G., sent me a spare drive shaft he had via FedEx. His request, that I send my broken part to him and we would be square. Refused money and even refused to let me pay for the FedEx cost.



    In the end I got mine repaired and reinstalled and was ready to go. The highpoint of this: Denny Berg helped me put the bike together. The Godfather of the Drifter, the man most responsible for the Drifter being created, worked on my bike. To me, that is like taking flying lessons from the Wright brothers or learning to drive from Richard Petty. Denny was gracious all week never getting tired of posing for pictures and autographing things. The original solo seat from my bike is autographed by him and sits on a shelf at home now, never to be sat upon again (well, plus it really sucks as a seat). As a thank you to Randy G. for sending me his drive shaft I had Denny autograph it and I took it with me for the rest of the trip having it pose for pictures at every state line and border crossing. Hey, someone has a gnome but Randy G. has a drive shaft!



    Mitchell and Jeannie had to return home after the Rally so Danny, Deb and I headed north. The ride was mostly uneventful for a few days if you don’t consider winds so high they pushed us around the road, a dust storm that turned day into night, and a hotel where even the crack heads don’t want to stay and when my tire irons jumped off the bike and hid in a ditch. They were very good at hiding and after an extensive search I determined I wouldn’t find them. Hope I don’t have a flat.

    We made it to the town of Golden British Columbia before the next “event”. Deb, who is vertically challenged, fell over on her bike in a parking lot and broke a rib. The bike broke a mirror.



    The next morning while Deb walked across the street to a Minute Clinic Danny and I went looking for a mirror. From what I understand the conversation between Danny and Deb went something like this:



    Danny: Well, I’ll go find a truck.

    Deb: Why do you need a truck?

    Danny: To get you and your bike home.

    Deb: Home? I’m going to Alaska.

    Danny: But you have a broken rib.

    Deb: And I’ll still have a broken rib no matter where we go. I’m going to Alaska.

    In my opinion, Deb has a huge brass pair. She rode to Alaska with a broken rib. I don’t know too many men who would do that.



    So having found a mirror to serve temporarily onward we rode. That day we rode through Yoho National Park and found out that Canadian frost heaves are not like US frost heaves. Canadian frost heaves can be as small as a one inch rise to a one foot rise. Deb hit one and the bike cleared the road. She leaned so far over her tank I thought she had passed out from the pain and was going to crash. Danny’s bike fared better but his trailer cleared the road. I thought I had lost fillings and bike parts. As we cleared the National Park Danny and Deb kept stopping and pulling over. This happened several times as Danny said he couldn’t see me in his mirror. About the third time Danny informed me that he couldn’t see my headlight in his mirror because my headlight was pointing straight down at my fender. One of the big heaves had caused my headlight bucket to shatter.



    I’d mentioned earlier about being a Boy Scout and watching MacGyver well Danny must have watched the show as well. He pulled a role of tape out of his trailer the likes of which I’d never seen. It was strong. It was tough. It was sticky. He proceeded to make infinity wraps and secured my headlight to my spotlights. He said he wasn’t sure how long that would last but it would do for now. It lasted until I got home.



    Two days later I separated from Danny and Deb. It had been our plan to ride together part of the way. They wanted to explore southern Alaska and I wanted to go north. I knew Deb should take a rest day or two as we hadn’t taken any in two weeks so we parted ways with hugs and “good lucks”.



    The Cassiar –

    This is a long road with few shoulders and some gravel. I gassed at Kitwanga where the Cassiar begins. Advice. Fill up there. You cross a wooden plank bridge and just to the right is a very small sign telling you there are no services before Bell II which is 152 miles away. Once you hit western Canada if you can’t ride 250 miles with the fuel in your tank, take extra fuel.



    It was a pretty day and the ride up the Cassiar is pretty. I gassed at Bell II and then headed on. I made it 27.5 miles down the road before I picked up a nail in the rear tire. I had not been stopped three minutes when an older gentleman stopped to ask if I needed assistance. As he didn’t have any tire tools I told him thanks but no reason for him to hang out while I make the repair as it would likely take two hours. He wanted to know how I was going to repair a flat with no tire irons so I told him I have wrenches, screwdrivers and I can cut a few sticks off the trees. It might take me a while but I would make the repairs. I had food, water and could make shelter so I was fine. I thanked him and he drove away and I started to once again remove the back end of the bike. My bike uses inner-tubes. I have to take the rear wheel off in order to change the tube. Tubeless tires would have been a benefit but I didn’t have that so I had to make do. About 30 minutes later three Canadian riders stopped and asked if I needed help. They had tire irons so I asked to borrow them. We chatted while I worked and I got the wheel off, tire lose, tube out, new tube in, tire back on and it held air. I told them they were welcome to stay and watch me put the bike back together but I could do that and I didn’t want to hold them up. Off they rode and shortly thereafter I did as well. Perhaps now is a good point to tell you about my tool kit.



    I never leave home without a toolkit. I carry a wide assortment of wrenches, sockets, screw drivers, pliers and a factory service manual. If there is something I can’t repair someone else probably can and with the manual the specs are there. I carry a paper copy as it doesn’t need batteries to operate. I also carry a scissor jack. It might seem strange for a motorcyclist to carry a jack but I can’t lift my bike alone and we have no center stands. Mama Kaw if you are reading this, give us back our center stands. I have inner tubes so I carry spares. I also carry bulbs, fuses, wire, tape, zip ties and safety wire. Anything I can repair at home in the garage I can repair on the side of the road. I also carry food, water and shelter. Boy Scout, remember.



    There are long stretches of nothing on the Cassiar. To steal a line from someone else “The vastness is huge” or as Danny put it “That place is so flat you can watch your dog run away for two days”. I rode as long as there was daylight and up there that is a long time. It was too long. I found myself tired, in the dark with nowhere to stop. Nowhere means no shoulder, no parking lot, nothing. There was no place to get the bike off the highway so I rode on to Jade City. Jade City is 372 miles up the Cassiar and I had ridden from Burns Lake that day. Total distance is 530 miles. Down in the US that isn’t a long day but up in BC where the speed limits are lower and some of the road sections are gravel that makes for a long day. I should have stopped earlier but the sun was up and I lost track of time. Knowing I needed sleep I stopped at the first place it was safe and that was a gas station in Jade City. At first I thought it was closed but upon closer inspection I found it was abandoned. Long out of business. The gas pumps weren’t even there any longer. But, I was tired and needed sleep so I rolled out a sleeping mat, covered myself with the bike cover and caught some z’s. Next morning I rode to Whitehorse which is only 330 miles away. Having not eaten much the day before I was in search of food. I stopped at a gas station/hotel/restaurant in Rancheria. I recommend the Yukon breakfast. Three eggs, three pancakes, fried potatoes, biscuits and coffee. At the time it was a bargain at $13. Food is kinda expensive up there. The waitress said she was surprised I ate it all; I told her I was thinking about ordering another one. I really was hungry and it really was good but I decided I could make it a few hours before eating again so, on to Whitehorse I rode. Found a place there and stopped early. Did some laundry and caught up on sleep. Next day I stopped in a bike store and bought the only two tire irons that had in stock. Just in case I get a flat. I rode to Fairbanks that day. Lots of pretty scenery.



    I found lodging in Fairbanks and got a good supper. Tomorrow, Deadhorse.



    It was raining. It had been raining. I waited until about noon for it to let off then I lightened my load for the trip to Deadhorse. A straight shot up then some sleep then back to Fairbanks. A 900 mile round trip in 36 hours. What the hell was I thinking? Have I lost my mind? Probably.



    I got to the start of the Dalton highway about 2:00pm. It was raining, there was new laid gravel, and my headlight was taped to my bike. I was tired. What the hell, north to Deadhorse so upon the Dalton I did ride for all of 12 miles through new deep soft gravel. It was like riding a washboard. There was no way my bike would hold together. And then I had an epiphany: Michael if you continue up this road it will end badly. Damnit!!



    It is easy to charge full steam ahead; it is difficult to accept that you are about to make a bad decision; it is almost unmanly to acknowledge your limitations. I turned around.



    The party is over and now nothing left but the clean up. But, I had ridden to the Dalton. I didn’t make it all the way up but I made it some of the way. Not many can say that. I knew I had to leave for home the next morning not having accomplished my goal. I knew the trip home would be long and tiresome; it always is. Heading back to real life is sometimes a bummer. I knew I had to leave for home the next morning not having accomplished my goal.



    I rode back to Fairbanks taking time to actually see Alaska. I had been so busy trying to get there that I hadn’t spent much time seeing “there”. By the time I got to Fairbanks I was at peace. I gave it a good shot and I have good reason to return. I had a restful evening and the next morning I headed back home. It rained all day.



    I ride ATGATT (all the gear, all the time). No skin beneath my chin and I usually wear a full face helmet. In the summer it can be very hot in that mesh but, sweat washes off. On the day I left Fairbanks if I had had more layers I would have worn them. I rode from Fairbanks to Whitehorse. I was wearing my mesh suit, my leathers, my rain suit and my insulated hunting boots. I really don’t like to be cold or wet; it was both. It was a wonderful day.



    I stopped for a while at Destruction Bay. I can’t even describe the feeling. You just have to go.



    Unbeknownst to me, Danny and Deb had departed Alaska that same day. They left from Tok and rode to Haines Junction. I passed right by the hotel where they were staying but didn’t see their bikes in the sea of bikes. Figure the odds.



    I stopped at Whithorse for the night. There were a lot of motorcyclist there. The hotel was connected to a bar and grill. I had a few beverages, swapped a few stories and gave myself permission to sleep in the next day. About noonish I left for points east. I had gotten on the Alcan from the Cassiar so I decided to follow the Alcan all the way to Dawson Creek, the start of the Alcan. At my first gas stop of the day who should I see but Danny and Deb. They had left Haines Junction that morning and had passed my hotel and not seen my bike in the sea of bikes. Figure the odds.



    We discussed the route back and they had also decided to ride to Dawson Creek. We were no longer in a race to get somewhere so we set a comfortable pace for the very long ride home. Somewhere on the Alcan my speedometer cable broke. Hope that is the last thing to break.

    We rode for several days, leaving the Alcan and heading for Edmonton. We rode from Edmonton to Minot, ND. It was the longest day. It took us 21 hours. Never again.



    From Minot we went our separate ways. Danny and Deb live in Arkansas and I live in Maryland. They left early and I slept in a bit because I was exhausted. It took me three days to get home. It was the longest three days of my life. I didn’t want to go home. I didn’t want to go back to work. I didn’t want to go back to reality. I wanted to go back to Alaska. I leave for Alaska the first week of July 2014. Destination, Deadhorse.



    28 days, 12,000 miles, one drive shaft, two rear tires, one front tire, one inner tube, an unknown quantity of gas, 16 states, five Canadian provinces, hundreds of people, thousands of square miles of nature, one moose, one cougar, several bears, goats, bison.

    I’ve been asked why I wanted to ride to Alaska. I want to ride everywhere. I want to see everything. I’ve been on five continents and I want to get to the other two. I’ve been asked why I rode a Drifter to Alaska. Easy, that is what I own. I’ve been asked if I would do it again. I can be packed in 30 minutes. I’ve been asked if I would do it all the same way and the answer is “almost exactly”.



    Had I not had the issue with my drive shaft I would have never had the interaction with Denny Berg. Had I not gotten the flat I would have never met the three Canadians who stopped to help. When talking later I found out Danny and Deb rode with them a few miles on the day they entered Alaska. They mentioned the other guy with an old looking bike who had had a flat. Figure the odds. Had my headlight not broken it wouldn’t be taped and I might have made the decision to continue up the Dalton instead of turn back. It might have ended well but probably not. If you want a guarantee of success, stay home. If you want a guarantee of an experience, go riding.
  7. DYNOBOB

    DYNOBOB lucky dog

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,072
    Location:
    Cincinnati, OH
    I'm working on a quick RR tutorial right now.

    .
  8. Super08

    Super08 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2017
    Oddometer:
    184
    Location:
    Alberta
    Deb: Home? I’m going to Alaska.

    Danny: But you have a broken rib.

    Deb: And I’ll still have a broken rib no matter where we go. I’m going to Alaska.


    You just have to admire that kind of determination and spirit.
  9. RockyDS

    RockyDS Lost in the wilderness

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Canadian Rockies.
    You don't need one. In the message/reply window, click 'Upload Pic or GPS Track, then select your picture from your computer. Once it's uploaded, select 'Full image', then add any text etc. followed by hitting 'Post Reply'.
  10. RockyDS

    RockyDS Lost in the wilderness

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
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    Location:
    Canadian Rockies.
    Excellent. :beer
  11. DYNOBOB

    DYNOBOB lucky dog

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,072
    Location:
    Cincinnati, OH

    In case someone finds it helpful, these are my tips for ride reports. Don't claim to be an expert on the subject, but these are some things I've learned by trial and error.


    First you should know I optimize my reports to display on a standard 1920 x 1080 computer monitor. This is important to know because it determines how photos are resized to use the available screen without being too large and taking forever to load a page. More on that later. I also think about the march of technology into the future when we're all viewing 4K (or even 8K) monitors. When viewing these ride reports 10 years from now the pictures are going to get smaller and smaller on the screen, at some point the pictures that fill a screen now will look like thumbnails. But you can only worry about so much...


    Prepare the pictures.

    1. I select my favorites and level the horizon, lighten shadows, darken highlights if needed in Photoshop. It takes a little time but can make a big difference. This is an example of Shannon's shot of me coming off the ferry in Skagway.

    Original:

    [​IMG]

    Repaired:

    [​IMG]



    2. Crop a picture out of a picture (if you have enough mega-pixels) to get a different perspective.

    This view

    [​IMG]

    Came from this shot

    [​IMG]



    3. Crop to the shape you want, either 16:8.8 format if I want a wider panoramic view.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Or crop to 3:2 if the picture works better taller instead of wider.

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    4. Resize the pics. I like for pics to display fully on a 1920x1080 screen without needing to click and unclick. What works for me is to resize a 16:8.8 (or 16:9) ratio shot to 1680 pixels across. Resizing photos is really important to how they display and how fast your ride report loads (especially if you have slow internet). Unnecessarily large pics are a bummer. I use Microsoft Paint to resize.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    And a 3:2 format resizes to a maximum of 1450 pixels across. This keeps the pic from running off the top and bottom of the screen.

    [​IMG]


    For shots that are less important to the story I may resize to 1500 pixels on a 16:9...


    [​IMG]


    or 1000-1350 pixels on a 3:2 ratio.

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]



    5. Save your edited/resized photos into a folder labeled by day of trip and upload to SmugMug. I have a Photobucket and SmugMug account, trust me on this, forget Photobucket and use SmugMug. Right now I pay $30-$50 a year to each service for hosting pics so they can link into ride reports. Beginning in 2019 Photobucket is going to start charging me $100 a year or all my early ride report pics are going to disappear :bluduh. Besides that, SmugMug's servers are way more reliable and load photos quicker - and the SmugMug guys started and provide us with the AdvRider forum.


    .
  12. DYNOBOB

    DYNOBOB lucky dog

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,072
    Location:
    Cincinnati, OH

    Next, write the report in Word and copy/paste into the forum.

    1. Obviously I like a summary and map at the beginning of each day so readers can keep their bearings. To create the map just open route in Google, MapSource, or Basecamp and use Snippy or whatever to grab a screenshot.

    [​IMG]


    I resize them around 1200 pixels across.

    [​IMG]



    Now you can write the report and insert picture links from SmugMug.

    [​IMG]


    2. How to insert links:
    Once you upload your pics to SmugMug you first need to go into the "Gallery Settings" and enable it to allow the "Original" size picture you uploaded to be linkable. If you don't do this you won't get the option of using the custom pixel sizes you resized to.

    [​IMG]


    Now you find the pic you want and click the share button (bottom right)

    [​IMG]


    On the "Share" menu click "Original" size and then copy the link in the "BB CODE" tab.

    [​IMG]


    Very Important! When you copy the link it will look like this.

    [​IMG]


    You need to delete the beginning and end of the link and make it look like this. Yes it's a little tedious.

    [​IMG]


    A trick to get two smaller pics to display side by side is to post them like this.

    [​IMG]


    Resize them so they are the same pixels tall and their combined width are less then 1625 pixels. Set the font of the 3 "periods" to black so they disappear.

    [​IMG] ... [​IMG]



    [​IMG] ... [​IMG]




    General items:

    - Important! Once you have the daily segment written divide it into 3-5 sections so it's not one long post. AdvRider displays 20 posts per page and if you do all your daily segments as one post there will be a zillion pics on one webpage and take forever to load. That is aggravating.

    - Weave some history of the area into the story. @Cannonshot reports are the gold standard for this, go read one. A quick way to inject history is grab a shot of markers, plaques, or signs you see.

    - Make sure your camera is set to 3:2 format so you're using the entire sensor. You can always crop to 16:9 later.

    - Change your font color so readers can pick out your posts.

    - Spell check is my best friend.


    This approach may seem complicated (yeah) but after you do a couple days of a RR it will become second nature. Anyway, it's just what works for me...


    .
  13. DYNOBOB

    DYNOBOB lucky dog

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,072
    Location:
    Cincinnati, OH

    Good decision making on a motorcycle...


    That's a great line!

    .
  14. ScotsFire

    ScotsFire And then a stranger rode into town...

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2016
    Oddometer:
    681
    Location:
    Here and there... but more there than here
    Thanks for posting your RR process. I've done a handful myself but learned some good tips and tricks in your synopsis.
    DYNOBOB likes this.
  15. Bigbob1

    Bigbob1 Rain Rider Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2009
    Oddometer:
    486
    Location:
    Juneau Alaska
    DYNOBOB likes this.
  16. max384

    max384 Bandaided Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2011
    Oddometer:
    5,690
    Location:
    Eagle Rock, PA
    Thanks for some great tips @DYNOBOB !!! I've done a few ride reports too, but I definitely haven't gotten to DYNOBOB-level ride reports yet!

    One thing I would add to this is to make sure that if you do change your font color, make sure that it is a color that is easily readable with all of the available advrider skins. I use the light background with black font as standard. A lot of guys use yellow font, which doesn't work for me at all. Yellow on a white background just looks like a light blur. I won't even attempt to read a ride report done in yellow font, as it will just aggravate me. Just something to keep in mind.

    Your orange font was perfect.
    RockyDS and DYNOBOB like this.
  17. DYNOBOB

    DYNOBOB lucky dog

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,072
    Location:
    Cincinnati, OH
    Good to know, thanks!

    .
  18. gunnerbuck

    gunnerbuck Island Hopper

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Oddometer:
    6,259
    Location:
    N.V.I, B.C.
    Nothing that elaborate, but when the chips are down you gotta come up with something to save the trip...

    Those photo tips you show can really make a good picture into a great picture...
    DYNOBOB likes this.
  19. MGV8

    MGV8 Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2010
    Oddometer:
    522
    Location:
    Canoe BC
    Thank you, I gave up trying to use my Smugmug for pictures. My report got pictures loaded 4 to a post, makes for a lot of pages if you have a lot of pictures. Only after my trip report did I discover how to load videos etc. That was only after a long search through AVD and asking questions. I'll definitely refer back to here for the next report if I make one.
    By the way, Great trip you guys had. I also have unfinished business and am looking forward to the next time. There is just too much to see and soak in. Plans for now are, way more time, truck and camper, wife, dogs, sidecar on a trailer behind.
    Till next time, maybe we'll both be on the same side of the river. :freaky
    DYNOBOB likes this.
  20. DYNOBOB

    DYNOBOB lucky dog

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,072
    Location:
    Cincinnati, OH
    MizzouRider, Bayner and KTM Mike like this.