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Using any GSW Special Tools?

Discussion in 'GS Boxers' started by marchyman, Nov 25, 2013.

  1. bemiiten

    bemiiten League of Adventures

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    A picture of the tools with measurements would nice to see if something can be fabricated with materials one might have lying around.
    #21
  2. Dr. Greg

    Dr. Greg Tryin' to get home.. Supporter

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    And just how did you obtain the FSM? I've been waiting on mine since I bought the bike (June). Of course being JVB I suppose you have resources unavailable to mortals :lol3

    --Doc
    #22
  3. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

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    :lol3

    Jim :brow
    #23
  4. atwoodtja

    atwoodtja Been here awhile

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    The locator pin is pretty complicated, it has channels cut into it that guide/lock it into place (according to the manual). The non-hydraulic chain tensioner is the most expensive piece to buy, also looks hard to fab.

    If anyone with these tools wants to rent them out for 2 weeks at a time, I'll be interested next summer when I'm due for a valve check/adjust. Or see if there is a group of Boston owners who want to share a set.
    #24
  5. Emoto

    Emoto Sure, why not?

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    I haven't looked into this yet, but it sounds like you have. How much is this tensioner tool?

    I wonder if the tool is really necessary? :scratch
    #25
  6. marchyman

    marchyman barely informed Supporter

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    Alignment pin: $78.09
    Alignment jig: 38.68
    Timing Chain Tensioner Assembly: $166.10
    Sleeve (for the Tensioner Assembly): 11.66

    I'll post pictures in a week or four when they arrive.
    #26
  7. gr8ridn

    gr8ridn Been here awhile

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    I saw the tools before buying at my dealer. It appeared to fabricate accurately I would spend as much as simply buying and there was no guarantee the tools would turn out correct. My experience is the BMW special tools, usually fabricated by Cartool, are very accurate and sturdy. I took the safe way out and bought them and am pleased with the quality. I have many tools from past bikes owned and they have proven cost effective. I can post a picture of them if it helps, not much to look at.

    I don't send out tools to keep them in good condition and available when I need them. These tools could be damaged if used without knowledge of the procedure and sequence in which they are used. If you don't want to shoulder the entire cost a group buy through your club or friends might be the best bet. Periodically I am asked to help out a riding buddy before a ride. I want these tools available at the time of need. Considering most farkles cost more than this set of tools, I consider them a maintenance farkle, just like a good set of torque wrenches or GS-911.
    #27
  8. gr8ridn

    gr8ridn Been here awhile

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    More tools to do the job are always a good thing. Enjoy:D
    #28
  9. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

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    For checking valves, definitely not. For swapping shims, in my opinion no.

    Jim :brow
    #29
  10. Poolside

    Poolside Syndicated

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    And/or, just turn the crank until the intake valves close.

    <BR>
    #30
  11. Poolside

    Poolside Syndicated

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    Jim, if the valve lash does need adjustment, do you know if it makes sense to remove the cam follower shaft. That would make it easy to reach the shims.

    <BR>
    #31
  12. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

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    If the shims need to be replaced the cams have to come out.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Jim :brow
    #32
  13. Poolside

    Poolside Syndicated

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    Oh yea, I see now. The follower shaft can maybe be removed, but to no avail because you can't get to the rear follower. Thanks for the extra picture.

    <BR>
    #33
  14. Emoto

    Emoto Sure, why not?

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    Once the cams are out, those followers can simply be flipped up out of the way for shim removal, right?

    The only thing I can think of that the re-tensioning tool might do is ensure a specific cam chain tension, which would have a theoretical impact on cam timing. I am not sure that it makes a difference in reality.

    Has anyone had the cams out and back in again without using the tool and noticed any difference in how the bike runs?
    #34
  15. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

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    Yes, just flipped up.

    So long as you do not move the motor at all, the cams can be reinstalled in exactly the same position. You need to remove the cam chain tensioner before removing the cams, to ensure no tension on the cam chain. Other than that, there is no danger of messing up the timing when removing the cams. I have done it twice now with no issues.

    Once you try it you will see what I mean.

    Jim :brow

    PS I demonstrate this in the video.
    #35
  16. Emoto

    Emoto Sure, why not?

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    Ok, cool. It looks like the tensioner is 3 pieces - the outer housing part that screws in, and 2 other items. Is the middle one a spring and the upper one a plunger that the spring fits into? The detail is not granular enough to tell, but am I correct in thinking there is no ratcheting type of stop? In other words, the plunger moves freely on the spring?

    [​IMG]
    #36
  17. gr8ridn

    gr8ridn Been here awhile

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    Correct, The chain tensioner is in three pieces with the spring in the middle. There is no ratcheting device with this system. Chain tension is controlled by both the spring and hydraulic pressure acting on the piston/plunger from oil pressure.
    #37
  18. bemiiten

    bemiiten League of Adventures

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    With this design, Not sure why the tensioner would need to be removed? How could the drive gear move when it's chained to the crank? Sounds like removing the tensioner would be the best way to accidently have the gear move.
    #38
  19. poochar

    poochar Adventurer

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    That is what I was thinking.... seems like chain tensioner is "out of the picture" for pulling out the cams (or measuring).

    Did you make marks on the teeth of the cams (do get them back in the same place again)???

    ....... looking forward to getting your video I have on order (JimVonBaden)
    #39
  20. Emoto

    Emoto Sure, why not?

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    Are you saying that when this tensioner is in place and the engine is running, that the force of the spring is augmented with hydraulic pressure from oil being pumped into this same tensioner? :scratch
    #40