Valve adjustment question

Discussion in 'Dakar champion (950/990)' started by seh750, Jun 5, 2004.

  1. seh750

    seh750 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2001
    Oddometer:
    956
    Location:
    Beaverton, OR
    Reading the manual appears the typical modus operandi is to adjust the valves on the rear cylinder, bolt that up, and then move to the front. Problem is I need to get the shims out on both ends to measure them and figure out what new shims I need. Is there a trick where I can do both the front and rear cylinders at the same time? It seems the risk is the difficulty of re-attaining TDC after removing the camshafts with the marked gears. Any suggestions or do I need to stick to one cylinder at a time?

    Thanks!
    #1
  2. Katoum

    Katoum Adventurer

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2004
    Oddometer:
    760
    Location:
    British Columbia, Canada
    If you could do both cylinders together that would make it way to easy. :evil Sorry, its one at a time. If you follow your manual carefully, you can safely remove both cams at the same time however. Fully familiarize yourself with the marks on the cams, which side there on and which marks are front and back, there are more than one kind of marks on the cams just to keep you confused. Find top dead center and check position of cams and it you want use a white paint pen and make some marks of your own. The cams lift out with out removing the chains, so its a pretty simple system. Do not let the crank turn when you have the cams out or you'll be really pissed, and probab ly just want to get :slurp .

    #2
  3. seh750

    seh750 Been here awhile

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    That's what I was afraid of, but it never hurts to ask, right? I guess I'll measure the rear, take out the cams, measure the shims, put it back together and then go do the front separately. Oh well, it's pouring rain here today anyway!
    #3
  4. turkish

    turkish Long timer

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    Yeah, that's just what I did. :baldy

    Had to borrow a dial indicator that would reach down through the spark plug hole to find TDC again. It wasn't really hard though.

    A couple of things I noticed: measure all your shims then rotate the engine and measure them again. Clearances will change a little. Also, even the slightest film of oil on the shim or the underside of the bucket will make things read really tight when you're putting everything back together. They're designed to run dry, don't think you're doing yourself a favor (like I did) and oil 'em up before reassembly.
    #4
  5. seh750

    seh750 Been here awhile

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    Thanks for the suggestion. Oh, by the way, has anyone found a good online source for valve shims? I'll try my dealer but they have a hard time finding anything...no parts fiche for the 950.
    #5
  6. Mully

    Mully Kineticist

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    Yer right: TDC is really easy to find for either cylinder using something to go in the spark plug hole (soda straw, thin screwdriver, piece of stiff wire.....) and the TDC locating hole on the crank. Say you took all four cams out and needed to re-time the engine:

    - remove the timing hole inspection bolt on the lower right side case
    - remove the spark plug for the rear cylinder
    - insert a soda straw/etc. in the rear cylinder
    - carefully rotate the engine until the soda straw is at its highest position
    - use a flashlight to look for the reference notch on the crankshaft flywheel: get the reference hole centered in the window and insert a 5mm hex key or drill bit far enough to bottom in the locating hole (it won't be a precise fit, but it'll locate the crank securely enough for you to reference the cams)
    - install rear cams using reference mark aligned with gasket surface
    - remove locating device and carefully rotate crankshaft 75 degrees forward and verify that forward cylinder locating notch is centered in the inspection window; again insert locking device (drill bit, whatever)
    - install front cylinder cams
    - remove locking pin and re-install inspection bolt (do it now, before you're distracted by buttoning everything up and forget to install the bolt and get an instant oil leak when you start it up.......don't ask me how I know that)

    Not rocket science, and I reckon you could do it a bivouac in Mauritania if you had to (and if the wind wasn't blowing :wink: ) `Course if you never take all four cams out and turn the crank, you'd never have to do any of this.

    Say: did you have any trouble with the length of your 5mm hex key/driver causing interference of your torque wrence with the frame rail at the rear, or is it just my tools?

    mully
    #6
  7. turkish

    turkish Long timer

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    I looked in the manual for some kind of reference mark, but couldn't find it. Where can you see the flywheel--is there a cover that comes off somewhere? That would have saved me a bunch of time.

    My first thought was to just drop a long screwdriver down the spark plug hole. In retrospect, I think that would have worked just fine, but I was paranoid about messing it up and having to tow a relatively new bike with a bunch of bent valves to the dealership.

    That diagonal support over the rear cylinder is a bitch. I never was able to get my torque wrench back there. My solution was to develop a "hand feel" for the required torque with the other bolts and then apply the same to the hard-to-reach one. I think another solution would be to cut off part of the 5mm allen tool that you use with your torque wrench. An extra 1/2 inch of clearance would let you get back there (with my tools anyway).
    #7
  8. Mully

    Mully Kineticist

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    It's an 8mm threaded hole in the right side cover, forward of the clutch cover, aft of the water pump:

    [​IMG]

    It's kinda hidden behind the edge of the skid plate. The reference spot in the crank flywheel is just a round hole.......

    [​IMG]

    ......so anything long enough, solid, and of about the right diameter will hold the crank in place; I used a 5.5mm hex key (for which I've never, ever, found another use for). There was a little bit of play in the crank, but not enough to effect the setting.

    I just happened to be chomping a Baja Fresh burrito and slurping an ice tea, so the straw was ideal. :nod

    Thanx - that's what I found, too. I figure I'll cut down a 5mm, 3/8 drive key for the next episode of valve adjusting.

    mully
    #8
  9. seh750

    seh750 Been here awhile

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    Location:
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    A long-enough 8mm bolt or screw works perfectly but it needs to be threaded most of the way. With that, there's no noticeable play in the crank, I couldn't get it to move at all.
    #9
  10. Renegade6

    Renegade6 Been here awhile

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    Feb 23, 2004
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    Try ktmtalk.com or ktm-parts.com. On another thread someone mentioned Aprilia shims should work as well and because the Aprilia shims work, BMW F650 should as well.
    #10
  11. turkish

    turkish Long timer

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    Ahhh. I found the screw hole--you're supposed to put a long bolt in there to keep the crank from turning. What I didn't realize is that it was recessed at TDC. Do you just poke your 5mm thingie in there and rotate the crank until the thingie drops in an extra step?

    Oh, and another question... Have any of you other shade-tree wrenchers noticed more gunk on your rear plug than on the front? My front plug was pretty clean, but the rear was slightly icky. The same was true for the rear intake valves which had a lot of soot.
    #11