Versys 300x adventure build

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by michaelkozera, Dec 27, 2017.

  1. michaelkozera

    michaelkozera Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2015
    Oddometer:
    1,109
    Location:
    calgary
    As promised, here is the build thread for my wifes 2017 versys x 300!


    she has affectionately named it "Lady", inspired by her old loyal dogs name that passed away years ago.

    We decided to designate this bike as a Versys 300x adventure due to the nature of the modifications that will be done to it.

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    we welcome all input, both negative and positive. as with my other builds, please feel free to ask me anything, the more input the better!



    before i start the build, a-little bit of background/planning:

    my wifey is ~5ft tall and weighs 105lb's with a 27" inseam.
    we will be building this bike with 4 primary objectives in-mind:

    1-first, bike has to be as light as physically possible <-----this is by far the single most important objective and as you will see we will be aiming for a wet weight of 350-360lb's and going to great lengths to achieve this.

    2- the bike has to be as comfortable on the highway as possible.

    3-she requested that she must be able to flat foot at least one foot, or almost flat foot both feet.

    4-lastly the bike must be able to preform off-road.


    - secondary objectives: good gas mileage, long service intervals, enough luggage capacity for multiday camping or multi week rides, and enough lights to be seen from space haha.





    after selling her ninja 300, she had 3 main bikes to choose from: the versys x 300, the crf250l rally, Yamaha xt250.

    she almost went with the Yamaha xt250 strictly due to weight and seat height. however i convinced her to get the 300x due to nearly triple the HP, and the fact she will be doing alot of highway. she probably will end up getting the xt250 later and have both bikes, one for the bush, and this one for long hauls.

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    initial impressions:
    after putting ~800km on the versys x 300 before it started to snow, i was pleasantly surprised.

    Kawasaki did a very good job with this bike.
    the suspension is very good for such a cheap bike, yeah it may only have R-5.8/F-5.1 of travel but it is very well dampened both on and off road. the engine is truly a gem, revs like a sport bike up high but putters around like a thumper at low revs. the clutch is stupidly light, tons of pull down low ( the re-tuned versys 300 engine is very noticeable when riding the ninja side by side with the versys), the aerodynamics of the versys are spot on for small riders as i found the fairings keep almost all of the wind off and they even "lipped" certain panels to reduce turbulence, well done Kawasaki! the windscreen is plenty wide but not tall enough, once raised it will be nearly perfect, the wind screen being lipped at the top makes a huge difference. the seat/foot pegs are rubber mounted and the handle bar has very heavy vibration dampeners, again, great work Kawasaki! fantastic fuel economy so far (averaging 3L/100km), however with her old ninja she was able to get 2.5L/100km (average) which we suspect will be the same with the versys 300, perhaps even better due to the re-tuned engine. assuming 2.5L/100km that's an impressive 700km range!



    only 4 major downsides i can think of for this bike, all of which will be remedied in this build:

    -385lbs may be light for most but for a 5ft, 105lb, 27" inseam person, 385lb's is like most riding a 600lb's+ bike.

    -lack of engine skid plate, an absolute must for any bike that wishes to go off-road/ or off-pavement. sad Kawasaki did not include one from factory.

    -headlight is just abysmal, as with most single bulb motorbikes.

    -handlebar being steel and not rubber mounted will bend like cheese first time you crash it off-road.





    now lets start the build!


    -"- warning, graphic images ahead -"-

    no mercy was given to unnecessary weight. angle grinder got one hell of a workout :p


    here is the bike stock, 800km and this will be the last time its 100% stock.
    [​IMG]




    1-seat

    stock seat was WAY too stiff. we measured 1/8" of foam compression with her weight on the seat (1/4" with my 175lbs.......). i dont understand why they made a seat thats 3" thick but only compresses 1/8"....... i suspect that the foam formula was tampered with resulting in some people having very stiff seats. like no joke, my R1 had a more comfortable seat and it was only 1" thick lol.


    so we bought that gel seat insert, came with a very light thin foam on top of the gel (seen in white) and a medium under layer (seen in grey), and gell of course is the green.
    [​IMG]



    we cut 1.5" off the back of the seat foam ( weight reduction and she wanted a very flat and low back seat for her giant loop bag)


    i then cut two medium foam side pieces for her butt cheeks and one piece for the front (the light yellow/tan). i also cut two very soft foam pieces (the dark grey) for the sides of her legs, reason its super soft is because i want her leg going straight down without interference from the seat foam to gain a few mm of leg inseam.
    [​IMG]


    lastly i covered everything with 1/8" neoprene
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    the stock seat was 3" thick, the new seat is 1.5" thick but it compresses ~0.5" thus the seat height is effectively 2" lower then stock

    then put the stock leather back on.
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    stock seat was 2289g
    saved 120g over the stock seat, foam weighs a fair bit surprisingly.
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    2-suspension / ride height.

    stock the suspension sags only 10% in the rear and 15% in the front for her (30% rear and 40% in the front for me 175lb).


    since the front suspension is non-adjustable i had to remove the pre-load spacer and cut it down. this had the effect of reducing the pre-load.
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    bottom pipe is stock, top pipe is the cut down one
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    now the bike sags 35% in the front for her. and still has the full 5.1" of travel.


    dampening was abit stiff in the front too so i removed a little bit of the fluid and replaced with 5w. after a few tests dialed it in perfectly for her weight.

    as for the rear, the pre-load is adjustable but even on its lowest setting it still was too stiff (20% sag), so i cut into the pre-load adjuster, i slightly cut into the paint of the shock, i assure u the shock was not damaged, only scuffed the paint. this lowered the pre-load even more and now sag is at 30% in the rear with her on it.
    [​IMG]


    please note that kawasaki used a rubber insert in the "eye" of the shock to reduce vibration from road, nice touch kawasaki!



    now that the suspension sag/ dampening was dialed in we can move onto ride height.



    front of the bike was lowered by exactly 2".
    easy enough, just lower the triple clamp. but there was an issue. if you lower it any more then 1" the radiator guard and the horn will slightly hit the wheel fender. so i cut the horn mount down and bent it too the side to clear the fender, and as for the radiator i simply pushed back the radiator mount and re-welded a new mounting bracket ( radiator sits 0.5" back now). this gave plenty of room for the front wheel fender and rubbing was completely eliminated. bent the brake line mount to the side too to help better clear the fork tubes.



    the back was lowered by 2.5".
    i originally was just gonna machine a new link but after closer inspection i found that there was an inherent problem with the stock geometry /design. the pro-link sits way too low, it sits a good 3-4" lower then the exhaust (when fully unloaded or 2-3" loaded). this would be a point of impact during off-road adventures. now considering that i will be shaving the oil pan down and moving the exhaust later ,this would further exasperate the problem. so i had to move the entire pro-link up into the chassis.


    i ended up welding two washers about 1.5" higher then stock. i also drilled a new hole in the shock (about 1" higher) , this had the desired effect as the pro-link now sits about 1.5" higher. geometry was not changed as the rear wheel travel i confirmed was still 5.8" of travel but since the geometry has roughly a 2-1 leverage ratio, moving the link up 1.5" lowered the rear of the bike by ~2.5".


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    stock
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    modded.
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    notice how it completely clears the exhaust now. and this in unloaded, once loaded the pro-link sits up even higher.

    cut the kick stand down by ~2" and re-welded the flat bottom and the kicker
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    there we go, she can flat foot one foot. seat height is now ~27.5"
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    mission accomplished.




    3-weight reduction

    pretty self explanatory. surprising how much steel weighs........ or plastic for that matter

    rear foot pegs and misc (2.6lb)
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    fake engine guards (1.5lb)
    20171211_230954.jpg

    rear rack (6.6lb)!!!
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    rear fender (2.6lb)
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    dont have a pic but the stock rear sprocket weighed in at 900g , aluminum one was ~300g (1.4lb in savings)

    i also didnt weigh the stock vibration dampener/handle bar but probably saved a few lbs there too. will know for sure in the final weigh in.


    will be swapping out every single stock steel panel/fairing screw with aluminum screws. and here is why......

    stock/steel:
    [​IMG]

    aluminum:
    [​IMG]


    swapped out the stock 3912g battery (8.6lb) with a 471g (1lb) lithium battery 7.6lb's in weight savings right there, thats huge!!!!
    [​IMG]

    removed the center stand mount (1.9lbs) . but kept alittle of it as it will be the mounting point for the future aluminum skid plate.
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    thats more then 25lbs so far. still got another 10lb's or so to shave off!! 350lbs wet here we come!




    4-handle bar , crash protection, hand guards

    oem crash guard weight (~2lb)
    [​IMG]


    since i lowered the front of the bike by 2", i had to cut down the front crash bar mount by 1" as seen below. the wheel fender was hitting it. the right side of pic shows where its suppose to be stock, the left is where i ended up putting it.

    please note i also had to crush the crash bar slightly (make it oval rather then round) and trim it to make it fit.
    [​IMG]



    hand guard (0.9lb)
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    installed a small wind deflector to add more comfort to her hands. the wind gets whisked under and away from ur fingers.

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    checking to make sure it clears the fender.

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    next , installed some adjustable levers.

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    had to cut the balls off the end off to get them to fit ( handle bar width/size issue), couldn't get the space necessary to make em fit. lucky only had to trim the ball.

    also put on some shrink wrap to help with holding cold lever in cold weather.

    [​IMG]


    did not weigh the new aluminum handle bar vs old steel one but i would guess about a pound in weight saving

    had to shave off some of the stock handle bar mounts, this is because the rox 2" anti-vibration riser has to be as far apart as possible for correct functionality, if the risers are to close together the handle bar will deflect from side to side too much during normal operation.
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    also milled out ( made 1/8" larger) the 1-1/8 fat bar mount to fit some rubber between the handle bar and the clamps, further reducing vibration.
    [​IMG]


    heated grips:
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    5-wind screen

    stock windscreen is fairly good but we noticed it was abit too vertical and not tall enough. so we made it taller by about 3" and we reduced the angle of the screen by about 5 degrees (further back).
    [​IMG]


    this had the desired effect as the wind now goes straight over and around her head, pretty much no turbulence at all at 110km/hr. but she can still see the road over her screen.
    [​IMG]





    6-vibration

    footpeg vibration dampening.
    125g (0.3lb) each. she wanted to get rid of them but after a ride with and without them, i told her to keep em as they get rid of alot of vibration, totally wort it. good job kawi!!
    [​IMG]


    the seat is rubber mounted already but some vibration still comes through so i added a 1/8" soft rubber to help with any vibration, now the bike seat rides butter smooth.


    the stock bar end / vibration damper is very heavy. didn't weigh it or the stock bar but probably saved a few lbs, but they could not fit in the new aluminum handle bar......
    [​IMG]

    handle bar was already rubber mounted from #4, but i added some vibration isolation to the bars-ends / hand guards.
    [​IMG]

    please note how the hand guard is rubber mounted along with and separate to the bar-end. this means the bar end does not directly touch the hand guard or the handle bar, its completely rubber isolated!
    [​IMG]


    with the handle bars rubber mounted to the riser, and the riser rubber mounted to the triple clamps, and the rubber mounted bar-ends the vibration is practically all gone. of course some still gets through, you can never get rid of all of it. but compared to ridged mounting i would say 95% of the vibration is gone.





    7- gearing

    stock bike has a 46T steel sprocket (900g), bike reved at 8k @120km/hr, way too high, especially for a 105lb person. so we ordered a 43T aluminum sprocket (~300g), bike now revs at about 7,300rpm @120km/hr. had to shorten the chain by 2 links , weight savings!!!!! lol

    bike still pulls up hills with a head wind just fine with me on it. and if needed 5th is always available.


    also installed some rear aluminum spools
    [​IMG]


    now,
    not only will the bike get better fuel economy but because it reves less the wear on the engine will be reduced too. which is good because after the oil pan is shaved we will loose about 20% oil capacity so end of the day oil life will remain about the same. also less vibration and engine/ exhaust noise is always a huge plus.


    8-rear of bike / tail light

    didnt feel like spending 150$ for a fender eliminator so i just made one from the stock fender metal pieces.


    in the pic below ive got the rear tire as high as it will go to make sure it clears everything.

    [​IMG]


    painted it with bedliner.

    [​IMG]

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    next i cut a hole in the rear tail light. this allows light to illuminate the license plate at night. so rather then have a separate bulb/ wiring for the plate light, one bulb does it all.

    [​IMG]


    covered the hole with a lexan piece that i frosted to give better light dispersion. i then plastic welded it on and put some silicone to seal it up.

    also not shown in the pictures i cut out a small hole in the fender to allow light to light up the plate.

    [​IMG]


    looking good!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    i actually didn't mind the look of the stock rear fender, but weight savings and fender eliminator always looks better IMO.

    9-headlights/projectors, foglights and lighting.



    not hard removing lens, just heat in oven at 230F for ~15 mins and pry apart.
    [​IMG]



    remove bulb. and replace with projector.

    [​IMG]



    i did have to trim the reflector a-bunch as the projector was too large and was hitting the headlight lens. if anyone plans on doing this i recommend using the mini H1-7.0 projector as the D2S-4.0 is just gonna be a pain in the ass.

    installed the shroud.

    [​IMG]



    all in and together, looks great. preforms amazing.


    [​IMG]

    did some testing last night, getting the beam level and at the right height.


    here is the stock v300x reflector headlight, with stock 55w bulb:
    [​IMG]


    here is the mini D2S 4.0 with 35w HID. wow! so much wider, so much more light down range, and half the wattage:
    [​IMG]

    highbeam:
    [​IMG]



    rubber mounted the foglights, made my own mounting bracket, painted with bed-liner of course.

    [​IMG]

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    lights look blue-ish in the photo but in Real life they are pure white, no blue at all, only in the cutoff as it should be.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    10-luggage

    luggage.

    good thing we took off the rear rail/rack. makes mounting the Giant loop bag much easier.

    we wanted the GL bag to be removable, but when i say removable, i mean like 5 secs removable, not sit there for 10 mins fiddling with straps and shit.


    so i sewed in some clips and 4 clips hold the entire bag on, 2 under the set, and 2 (one on each side) on the lower part of the bag attached to the rear sub frame. takes about 15 secs to remove or install the entire bag
    [​IMG]

    just testing fitment with stuffed full of cloths.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    11-exhaust

    next up is the exhaust:

    in case anyone is wondering , the stock muffler weighs 3830g (8.4lb). so easily can save 4-5lbs with an after market pipe.

    however, we both enjoy quiet exhaust so we are keeping the stock one.

    [​IMG]


    the catalytic converter weighs in at: 737g (1.6lb)

    and that is not even the whole story, because if you remove the cat you still need the pipe, thus the cat only weighs less then 100g.....

    so looks like we are keeping the cat too.

    [​IMG]



    flipped the water temp sensor and re-enforced the wire to allow it not to touch the engine using shrink wrap.

    [​IMG]


    next, re-positioning and tack welding the exhaust:
    [​IMG]

    making sure the exhaust does not hit her foot, which it doesn't.

    clears the brake lever too.

    [​IMG]




    looking good. not finished but tacked up , ready for final welding.

    [​IMG]

    plenty of ground clearance now and since i used less piping then stock exhaust , it did save some weight too. my guess is about 1-2lb's

    u may also notice that i moved the exhaust header back towards the engine, this is to make room for the skid plate to come. so the skid plate clears the front wheel.


    kept the O2 sensor too.



    still have to make a heat shield for the exhaust to protect the water sensor, and wrap the exhaust where her foot will be as to not burn/melt it.


    12-oil pan / ground clearance, and skid plate.


    [​IMG]


    weighs in a 2632g (5.8lb) including screws, pretty heavy for an aluminum skid plate i know but i wanted maximum protection/ coverage. and at 4.7mm (3/16") thick 6061 she can land the entire bike on a pointy rock and i am confident the plate will survive.


    ground down the welds/edges.

    [​IMG]



    next, sanded the entire plate smooth.

    [​IMG]



    3 bolts hold the entire plate on. two in the back and the front bolt is that long one that attaches the engine to the frame. ( so total of 4 mount points).

    [​IMG]



    reminds me of one of those dakar bikes with the massive skid plate

    [​IMG]


    exhaust shield flows nicely with the plate.

    [​IMG]


    oil changes will be a breeze, just take out both back bolts and the plate pivots forward. EZ

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    14-electrical
    not quite the same "loom of doom" as my 500L, but enough to cause a head ache.


    fuse box fits nicely on the side of the bike hidden away on the fairing.

    4 relays and 4 fused power.

    relay for :
    -foglight
    -headlight/DRL
    -headted grips/12v socket
    -highbeam

    [​IMG]

    and the switches for them
    [​IMG]


    all relays work off of switched power off the ignition so if the bike is off the relays are off.


    15-tires

    16-misc


    [​IMG]

    pretty straight forward install, pull out the stanchion tubes, slide the gators over em and zip tie them in place.

    i ended up cutting the gators in half to fit correctly.


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    that will keep the dust off the stanchions





    phone mount installed today. its replaceable on the fly with a quick release under the phone mount, can be used with various mounts.

    also installed those tank grip pads.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    17-final weigh in


    you guys ready for this?

    bike is fully fueled, but i did not include the luggage (giant loop bag ~5lb's)


    rear tire: 174.2lb

    [​IMG]

    front tire: 187.4lb's

    [​IMG]



    187.4lb+174.2lb= 361.6 lb's!!!!


    [​IMG]




    mission accomplished!


    a few things left to here and there, like headlight alignment, ergonomic adjustments, etc,etc.
    #1
  2. michaelkozera

    michaelkozera Long timer

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    #2
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  3. PaD

    PaD Serial beginner

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    This thread needs a new ”button”
    Like is not enough - where is the ”LOVE-button”?

    Whenever you have time please tell us about what battery you choose and if there are any cons (was almost saying ’anything negative ’ but then remembered there is always 1 negative side of every battery :D)
    #3
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  4. michaelkozera

    michaelkozera Long timer

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    thanks man. much love indeed haha.


    as for the battery, as seen in the photo i provided in the first post its a WPS feather weight lithium battery. weighs 1lb (7.6lb lighter then stock lead-acid)!
    #4
    Redneck-Hippie and PaD like this.
  5. rockt

    rockt Long timer

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    You're a brave man, Michael. Cutting up a brand new bike is not for the faint of heart. But you have the experience, (read your CRF500L build - awesome!), and the passion - what better reason to do this than to make your wife comfortable, safe and happy.

    The only thing I'm a bit concerned about is the reduced oil capacity. I know you're revving lower with the taller gearing, (will be interesting if this triggers a check engine light, but we'll know later on), but engine oil is not just for wear, as you know, but takes heat away. I'm sure you've already thought of this, but I'd use the best synthetic available and I'd try to wire in a oil temperature gauge somewhere.
    #5
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  6. snipesd

    snipesd Adventurer

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    Since you changed gearing, is there a check engine light on? Some say they get an error or code of some sort after 30-40 miles. Wondering if you have seen this ... looking good so far. Happy wife - happy life! I got to thinking maybe you live where you can’t ride this time of year so no mileage on it yet?
    #6
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  7. rideforzen

    rideforzen Been here awhile

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    Looking good so far. Nice job !
    #7
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  8. Moto-Kafe

    Moto-Kafe Gnarly Entre-manure Supporter

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    If you have the $$$ : Titanium :D
    #8
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  9. michaelkozera

    michaelkozera Long timer

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    looky looky what came in today.

    TRS D2S 3" projector v4.0, TRS led foglights, TRS 5000k bulb, 35w ballast and a few extra lighting needs.
    [​IMG]


    the way i look at it is that if you have a lower gear ratio u get better fuel economy. so if a bike say normally gets 4L/100km but with a taller gearing now averages 3.5L/100km there will now be 0.5L/100 km worth of less heat energy to dissipate. since 0.5L of gasoline=17.1 MJ/L of energy. ( 4L=136.8MJ/L) soooo 17.1/136.8 = 13% less heat per every km driven.

    also have to remember engines carry like 4-5 times more oil then nessesary to prolong engine oil life, the oil pan tends to be a reservoir for excess oil.

    i think it will be just fine. ive put over 100,00km on my crf500L and im running 30% less oil then stock.


    i rode about 100km on the new 43T sprocket and no light.

    thanks! she was pretty happy too. a huge smile under her visor

    thats what i told her, but diminishing returns sadly. and her budget all in is 10g
    #9
  10. Gramp-Z

    Gramp-Z Long timer Supporter

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    Interesting work there . I will be watching as you are going to mill down the sump and re work the pipes . At Sturgis many years ago I thought my eyesight was going . Saw what looked exactly like a Silverwing , but was too small . The husband had cut down silverwing saddlebags and fairing and modified the heck out of a Honda 500 Shadow . His wife was 4'11" , she could flat foot just fine . Hats off to your creative problem solving .
    #10
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  11. michaelkozera

    michaelkozera Long timer

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    yes the oil pan will be shaved and the exhaust re-routed.

    bike stock has about 7" of ground clearance, but now sits at around about 4.5". once i do the work and install the skid plate , will be looking at about 6" of ground clearance.
    #11
  12. Redneck-Hippie

    Redneck-Hippie Adventurer

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    Wow great build. I have been curious about harmonics and vibration damping since owning and selling a 690.
    I am impressed with the vibration damping approach you've taken, it makes sense.

    I am thinking polymer vs rubber, having spent some time looking at the Mako 360 damping system. It may be efficient and cheap to get fat bar risers1-1/8 for use with 7/8 bar and fill the difference with a bushing cut to fit or make one to fit.

    Wall thickness would be about 6mm for bushing.
    Bisect the bushing for easy installing.
    Done.
    Making one from polymer would be an extra step.

    Watching with interest.
    #12
  13. Argus16

    Argus16 #BeBest Supporter

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    For whatever reason I've read every post on the Versys 300 thread... (not getting one, KLR & new VStrom in the garage already); I'm just very keen on this bike.
    I think what the OP is doing with the height reduction is quite brilliant; I wouldn't have thought of that mod with the Pro-Link. Very clever.

    Carry on.
    #13
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  14. Ken in Regina

    Ken in Regina Long timer

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    Regina, SK, Canada
    @Michael, don't be disappointed if you see little or no change in fuel mileage. Bullwinkle and I both went up a tooth on the front, which is pretty much the same as going down 3 teeth on the back. Neither of us saw any significant change in fuel consumption. As has been discussed in the main thread, the primary factor in fuel consumption with this bike is speed. Go faster, use fuel faster; go slower, use fuel slower.

    For those who keep wondering about a gearing change causing the warning light to come on, the only report of that I've seen was when a change was made to both front and rear sprockets, totaling a very significant change. Many of us have made the same minor gearing change as Michael (+1T front or -3T rear) with no issues.

    I assume the reason Michael changed the rear instead of the front was because it allowed him to also switch to a nice light aluminum rear sprocket. That would make a useful reduction in weight. Changing the front wouldn't make any relevant weight difference.

    ...ken...
    #14
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  15. michaelkozera

    michaelkozera Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2015
    Oddometer:
    1,109
    Location:
    calgary
    correct.

    figured id hit two birds with one stone. weight reduction and gearing change. about 1.4lb's thats huge for something thats spinning.


    also, on a side note. aluminum wears roughly 3 times faster then steel, but the aluminum 43T rear sprocket is roughly 3 times larger then the steel front sprocket, thus both should wear out at the same time making chain, and front/rear sprocket changes a "do it all at once kind of deal". which is good practice since you "should" be changing all 3 at the same time anyways.
    #15
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  16. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    4,134
    Location:
    Arlington, Texas
    Nice work. After riding a 350lb bike, she's really going to love a new XT250. At her weight it will perform very nicely. My riding buddy (260lbs) and his grandson (145lbs) both rode 2008 XT250's on a 50/50 Colorado jeep trail ride a couple years ago. ONLY down side was on 65 mph+ highway sections. I think the newer FI XT250's might be better.
    #16
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  17. michaelkozera

    michaelkozera Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2015
    Oddometer:
    1,109
    Location:
    calgary
    my dad owns a 2015 xt250, its got FI and its a gem of a bike. probably one of the best bush bikes one can buy, crazy where you can take that thing.
    #17
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  18. gorilla2891

    gorilla2891 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2009
    Oddometer:
    436
    Location:
    NW WA. LaConner
    Great thread! Just rode my Ladies versysx home yesterday. She's 5'9" so lowering isn't needed but less weight and off-road mods lighting, everything on your list is on mine too. :clap
    #18
  19. strongleftleg

    strongleftleg Rider on the storm

    Joined:
    May 13, 2007
    Oddometer:
    156
    Location:
    Vancouver,BC,Canada
    I was wondering when a separate x-300 adventure build thread would show up. Great work so far, thanks for taking the time to post.
    #19
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  20. MotoPolo

    MotoPolo So many places, so little time Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2015
    Oddometer:
    575
    Location:
    Portland OR
    when you were working out the suspension linkage did you notice that the stock linkage "straight-lined" as the shock bottomed, my term meaning the three linkage pivots were all in a straight line? On my WR it looks like they tried to do this so that both the shock and suspension linkage bottom at the same time. If you did notice this, were you able to preserve it with the geometry change? What bottoms first on your new geometry - the linkage or the shock?

    Curious minds want to know
    #20